Police in Schools

North Carolina Deputy Fired After Video Shows Him Body-Slamming Middle Schooler

The deputy now faces possible criminal charges.

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A North Carolina school resource officer has been fired after a video was shared with a local news station showing the officer brutally body-slamming a middle schooler.

Local news outlet CBS 17 first aired the shocking video several days ago, which shows a Vance County Sheriff's deputy picking up a middle school boy and slamming him to the ground twice, before dragging him off-camera. Now the station reports that the deputy has been stripped of his badge.

"We went over and when we first saw the video, we were stunned, we were shocked. We all are parents and grandparents that have children at that same age, so it brought some great concern to us," Vance County Sheriff Curtis Brame told CBS 17 last Friday.

The incident is just the latest in a string of school arrests that have made national news. In November, a school resource officer in Orange County, Florida, was fired after video showed him yanking a middle school student by her hair. In September, an Orlando school resource officer was fired for arresting two 6-year-olds. Last year, video showed a school resource officer in Texas pinning and handcuffing an autistic 10-year-old.

The Justice Department's 2017 report on civil liberties abuses by the Chicago Police Department included findings that officers beat and tased teenagers in school for non-criminal conduct and minor violations.

As I wrote in a recent column for Reason on child arrests, "The criminal justice system has become America's default solution for all of its social problems, and that mentality has oozed into the classroom."

ABC News reported in October that, according to FBI crime data, 30,467 children under the age of 10 were arrested in the United States between 2013 and 2018. During the same period, 266,000 children between the ages of 10 and 12 were arrested.

The good news is that the rate of juvenile arrests has dropped significantly since its peak, from around 8,500 arrests per 100,000 individuals between the ages of 10 and 17 in 1996 to 2,400 in 2016. 

However, according to 2016 data from the Justice Department, 34 states have no minimum age for delinquency.

In a statement to CBS 17, Irena Como, acting legal director for the ACLU of North Carolina, said, "This type of heartbreaking incident is all too common as educators increasingly rely on law enforcement to handle routine disciplinary issues, especially with children of color and children with disabilities."

"School Resource Officers are charged with protecting students, but they use physical force and escalate situations to the detriment of students," Como continued. "School Resource Officers should never handle disciplinary issues, which are more appropriately addressed by school counselors or mental health professionals, and the routine presence of police in schools should end."

The now-fired deputy, whose name has not been released, is also facing potential criminal charges.

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  1. Be honest—we’ve all WANTED to body-slam a 13-year-old once in a while…

    1. I don’t think the officer’s mental age is anywhere near that high.

    2. This is what happens after forty years of progressives running government education. Administrators are weak, stupid progressives incapable of leadership. Die to their incompetence, they have sub rotated their disciplinary responsibilities to cops, who shouldn’t even be there in the first place.

      Once again, the solution is to remove progressives from the situation altogether. The bad resource officer is merely a symptom of the progtardery that has ensued.

      1. This is what happens when people don’t discipline their children. If that had been me in that video getting “slammed”, I would have got my ass beat for causing the problem. And for having a resource officer have to deal with it. Back in the day, it would have been a teacher doing that “slamming”.

        1. I watched the video. I don’t see where the kid caused any trouble. The officer is walking down the hall, the kid is coming walking up behind the officer along the wall. Attempts to walk past the officer, between the officer and the wall and the officer turns, grabs and body slams him with no warning and for no apparent reason.

          1. I bet the kid called him nigger or faggot, or both.

            1. I can bet all sorts of stupid shit without a shred of evidence, too, but it’s irrelevant. Remember the old “sticks and stones” thing? If you are in a position of authority, it doesn’t matter what people say to you, you don’t lose your temper like that. The video shows what the idiot deputy did; we don’t need to “bet” about it.

    3. oh yes,
      I have mixed feelings about this only because knowing the kids these days , and with out audio, it is unknown the words transpiring, the kids these days can really be verbose to the point you have had enough of the verbal abuse , Im not saying this was the correct choice of action but after seeing so many teachers, bus drivers and other kids being beaten by students with no recourse, this guy most likely had had enough , I find it hard to believe that they were just casually walking to were ever this kid was being escorted and all of a sudden the officer decided this is a good time to …all hell , what the heck let’s just body slam this kid , there’s more to this then we know , the kid must of really did something to be escorted by an officer, kids these day have set the arena of I can do and say what I want with no recourse because I’m a kid, verbal and physical abuse applies to all people, and it’s to the point were the adults have had enough of the physical and verbal abuse , and this was taught through bad parenting, these kids learned it from someone, somewhere, my bet is this is what happened to this officer, he had had enough, not just by this one particular, but a built up of many , like I said, there more to this then we know, and it may not of been the right thing to do , but apparently it was bad enough to were the officers felt this way ,

  2. “School Resource Officers are charged with protecting students, but they use physical force and escalate situations to the detriment of students,” Como continued.

    Officer safety and total compliance laugh at deescalation! That shit is for pussies! Real cops escalate every situation, and win! Don’t matter if it’s a man, woman, or child! Piss off a cop and you get your ass whooped! Blue lives matter!

    1. I hesitate to assume that Officer Punisher here would try the same approach with someone more than half his size.

      1. No, that’s when you go to the weapons. Obedience or death—that’s the feudal way.

    2. The kid was coming right at him….

      1. The kid was just attempting to walk past the officer in the hallway.

        1. Did he ask permission to pass?

  3. In a statement to CBS 17, Irena Como, acting legal director for the ACLU of North Carolina, said, “This type of heartbreaking incident is all too common as educators increasingly rely on law enforcement to handle routine disciplinary issues, especially with children of color and children with disabilities.”

    Guess it’s even worse when escalated to the level of a hate crime by reason of skin color and/or disability. Them racist punk-ass white kids are so used to it, it’s just turn-about-is-fair-play.

  4. Why are police interacting with middle school kids? I pay taxes to hire police to deal with criminals not children. So what he was doing there at all is the first question that needs to be asked.

    I think the answer to that is that thanks to the ACLU and a lot of the people who are claiming to be outraged by this, schools can no longer suspend and discipline students and to the extent they can it is done by zero tolerance policies and criminalizing normal bad behavior.

    So, yeah this is outrageous. Sadly, the problem is not this cop. The problem is the idiots who created the policies that put him in a school to begin with.

    1. You mean good intentions don’t always have good results? Heresy! Burn the blasphemer! The intention of putting cops in schools is to guard against these mass shootings that are happening every single day! It was never to have violence be used on children by someone who uses violence for a living! That was never the intention! It can’t possibly be the result! Why do you hate the children!

      1. Columbine was why they proliferated but I seem to recall they started in the inner city schools during the crack period. Certainly less about the ACLU and more about the parents demanding action. Reminds me of the line from Batman: and in their desperation they turned to a man they didn’t fully understand.

    2. Why are police interacting with middle school kids?

      Public schools operate a lot like prisons, and sometimes the cops get confused.

      1. Public schools are prison. Children are required by State to be there. Just because they go home at night doesnt mean they arent imprisoned during the day.

    3. The problem is both—the policy of putting police in schools to handle disciplinary matters, AND the sick way that cops view themselves and their role.

    4. Have you watched the video? There is no apparent bad behavior by the boy who got body slammed in this particular case. All he did was try to pass the officer in the hall, and the officer attacked him with out warning or provocation.

    5. “Why are police interacting with middle school kids? I pay taxes to hire police to deal with criminals not children. So what he was doing there at all is the first question that needs to be asked.”

      I cannot speak to any particulars of this child, and what that cop did seems to me to have no justification and rises to the level of rank criminality.

      But do not assume that middle schoolers cannot be criminals, and criminals of the worst sort (violence, sexual violence, etc.) Because they can, and they are, and those kids are in your schools. Some are legitimate monsters, most are just the wrecked products of horrible upbringing.

      So the answer is: Sometimes the cops are their because of the kids who really shouldn’t be.

      1. “So what he was doing there at all is the first question that needs to be asked.”

        I don’t know for sure if this is correct, buy my understanding is the most of the school districts that have an on site police presence as “resource officers” originally did so as security against potential outside threats. Why hire normal security guards when the local/county government already has all those armed agents on payroll.

        But it’s government, so mission creep.

      2. Two 13 year old and a 14 year old shitheads just murdered a young girl college student in new York trying to rob her. And the same group of little shitheads repeatedly stole from the deli near where they murdered the girl and threatened property owners.

        …and when the first one went to court he was “accompanied by his aunt n uncle” aka mommy n daddy are crackheads.

  5. Yeah, that could have done serious, permanent damage to that kid. That cop should serve at least several years in prison.

    1. +1

      Yep, that would be felony assault for any adult who did it. That he did it under color of authority warrants maximum punishment.

  6. Potential charges? Why was he not arrested as soon as the video was shown to the cops? A horrible example of blue privilege.

    1. Hey, you want to second-guess someone whose life is on the line every day? The kid probably made a furtive gesture requiring the Officer to make a split-second decision. And then another split-second decision when he picked the boy up again.

      1. Yeah, the kid’s hands were dangerously close to his waistband.

  7. Goddamned surveillance society sure does complicate an old fashioned rights-violatin’

  8. I think this is in part a result of the criminalization of school discipline. When educators get punished for the least little thing the students or their parent have any problem with, they’ll just push it off on law enforcement.

  9. What, no Roundup?

  10. From watching the video I would say that maybe a criminal charge of assault against a minor is in the works.

    1. Any non cop would be arrested already.

  11. Vance County Sheriff’s deputy picking up a middle school boy and slamming him to the ground twice, before dragging him off-camera. Now the station reports that the cameras are being removed from school hallways deputy has been stripped of his badge.

    1. And from the video, the boy doesn’t appear to have done anything to provoke such an attack other than attempting to pass the officer in the hall.

      What The Fuck?!

      1. Nah, that kid was plainly being escorted by the officer. I have little doubt that the kid was also mouthing off.

        But, he’s supposed to be the trained professional. Nothing that kid could possibly say should ever cause you to lose your cool. And there is nothing – nothing – that would warrant that sort of violence.

        If the kid was a danger to himself or others you put him in a hold. You do not raise him off the ground and slam him down with force, much less do so repeatedly. That could have killed him.

        1. My thoughts too. He’s clearly escorting the little shitburger. There’s no justification for what the officer did, but i hate entitled shithead kids too.

          So if the cop goes to jail and the kid was scared straight…win win.

        2. “Nah, that kid was plainly being escorted by the officer. I have little doubt that the kid was also mouthing off.”

          Pure speculation, there is nothing in the video to support any of that.

  12. In my junior high the teachers handled that stuff. Mostly shop teachers. But we always had a big vice principal.

    1. Yeah, if anyone is going to be body-slamming 80-pound boys in schools, I’d rather it be the shop teacher than a cop.

    2. Handled what stuff? Beating students up for doing nothing worse than walking past an adult in the hall?

      I would hope that even back in the day when schools still had the ability to impose real discipline, that any teacher or school administrator would have ended up in jail for doing such a thing.

  13. At least the poor kid will be rich if the lawyers don’t get it all.
    He probably made a doughnut joke.

  14. This guy calls himself a cop?
    He should’ve at least smacked the kid about 50 times with his baton, shot him the head twice and kicked him until the kid passed out, and then blame Trump.
    Cops have gone soft in America.

    1. There’s no sound—did he forget to yell, “stop resisting”?

  15. Meanwhile the Granville county sheriff (the county immediately to the west of Vance county) is under indictment for obstruction of justice stemming from accusations he tried to have one of his deputies killed for outing him as a racist. Keep it classy NC.

  16. Who raised that deputy?
    “The whole good cop/bad cop question can be disposed of much more decisively. We need not enumerate what proportion of cops appears to be good or listen to someone’s anecdote about his Uncle Charlie, an allegedly good cop. We need only consider the following: (1) a cop’s job is to enforce the laws, all of them; (2) many of the laws are manifestly unjust, and some are even cruel and wicked; (3) therefore every cop has agreed to act as an enforcer for laws that are manifestly unjust or even cruel and wicked. There are no good cops.” ~Robert Higgs

    1. Even with that, there’s exceptions. I’ve known cops who do quietly refuse to enforce certain laws.

  17. Is this the same guy who ran out the door when the shooting started?
    I guess he’s finally found someone who doesn’t intimidate him.

  18. North Carolina’s constitution bans collective bargaining for police (and school employees, and other public employees), so luckily he got fired quickly. No union grievance process or desk work to protect him on paid leave.

  19. Where’s David French to defend the actions of law enforcement?

    Man, the brutality of these thugs is shocking.

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  21. I have mixed feelings about this only because knowing the kids these days , and with out audio, it is unknown the words transpiring, the kids these days can really be verbose to the point you have had enough of the verbal abuse , Im not saying this was the correct choice of action but after seeing so many teachers, bus drivers and other kids being beaten by students with no recourse, this guy most likely had had enough , I find it hard to believe that they were just casually walking to were ever this kid was being escorted and all of a sudden the officer decided this is a good time to …all hell , what the heck let’s just body slam this kid , there’s more to this then we know , the kid must of really did something to be escorted by an officer, kids these day have set the arena of I can do and say what I want with no recourse because I’m a kid, verbal and physical abuse applies to all people, and it’s to the point were the adults have had enough of the physical and verbal abuse , and this was taught through bad parenting, these kids learned it from someone, somewhere, my bet is this is what happened to this officer, he had had enough, not just by this one particular, but a built up of many , like I said, there more to this then we know, and it may not of been the right thing to do , but apparently it was bad enough to were the officers felt this way ,

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