Police Abuse

Our Police at Work: It's Not Public Property. It's State Property! And We'll Make Up a Reason We Bothered You to "Cover Our Ass"

Police are certainly not lacking for a nearly endless variety of petty reasons to harass and force money from you when you bother them by documenting their behavior.

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A Great American Police Work story, reported at Raw Story, thanks again to the magic of cheap and widespread recording technology, involving:

Michael Picard's encounter with the troopers last September, when he and a friend were detained while standing on a highway to warn motorists about a DUI checkpoint in Hartford, Connecticut….

One trooper, identified as Jeff Jalbert, is seen approaching Picard's friend and saying that they were called to the scene because "somebody just said that one of you guys had a gun on them." Picard states that he is carrying a gun, but that he has a permit allow him to do so.

Trooper First Class John Barone is later seen in the video reaching for Picard's phone and telling him it was illegal for him to be filmed on a city street.

"Did you get any documentation that I am allowing you to take my picture?" Barone asks.

"No, but you're on public property," Picard replies.

"No I'm not," the trooper responds. "I'm on state property. I'm on state property."

Barone then seizes Picard's camera, but does not realize it captures his discussion with Jalbert, Sergeant John Jacobi, and an unidentified trooper after noting that Picard's gun is legal. Barone can be heard asking his colleagues, "Want me to punch a number on this? Gotta cover our ass."

Later, Jacobi recommends to the group, "I think we do simple trespass, we do reckless use of the highway and creating a public disturbance. All three are tickets."

"Then we claim that, um, in backup, we had multiple people, um, they didn't want to stay and give us a statement, so we took our own course of action," an unidentified trooper adds….

Picard says "As of now, the prosecutor has not dropped the case despite having video evidence of police misconduct."

Raw Story picked up the story from the Free Thought Project.

The video:

For extra police recorded dark tragi-comedy this morning, Oakland cops on tape telling Hernan Jamarillo in 2013 "sir, we are not killing you" minutes before the 51-year-old man they were all on top of died. His crime? Being in his room and acting erratically after his sister (foolishly) called the cops about a ruckus in his room she thought was an intruder.

Hat tip: Gabriel Starr

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  1. I’m glad the prosecutors are still diligently investigating these thugs.

    1. I thought they weren’t pursuing the thugs, but were still after the “civilians”, instead.

      1. That’s probably one of the most infuriating and irritating bullshit habits cops have — referring to non-cops as civilians.

        Law enforcement personnel are also civilians. Get it into your thick fucking unionized skulls, cops.

        1. Stop pissing up that rope. I am a civilian and still use that word when referring to others outside my profession or occupation or hobby or any other number of us-vs-them relativities.

          Grow up.

          1. True. I have referred to front of the house as civilians before, this is true.

            On the other hand, I don’t actually believe that I am a military asset.

            +1 teeeeechnically correct weasel argument

          2. 1) You’re equating your benign lexical tendency to make distinctions with that word between yourself and people who, say, don’t share your enthusiasm for amputee porn and deep-fried Kibble, or whatever the fuck it is in your diet provokes you into pissy fits, to a verbal representation of the fundamentally retarded, detrimental, immoral, and painful mindsets within which these sorts of cops tend to operate.

            I don’t give two shits what you call the folks that refuse to play Bingo with you. Every instance I’ve ever seen of cops using that sort of phraseology is indisputably demonstrative of their view of themselves — superior, righteous, law-bringing soldiers.

            1. Take a different look at it, from the perspective of the Third Amendment and the founding fathers. They would consider today’s cops as soldiers. There weren’t any government police back then.

              1. Civilian constabularies and watches, varyingly employing both paid individuals to deputized volunteers, have existed since the 17th century.

                1. And those civilian constabularies and watches counted as “militia” rather than as “standing armies” or “troops.” They weren’t armed with any weapons forbidden to ordinary folk, and they didn’t have any special powers denied to ordinary folk.

      2. “Look John, we can’t have you running around out there killing friendly civilians.”

        “There are no friendly civilians!”

  2. The process is the punishment.

    1. This.

      “Oh, you lost your job because you were in jail for a week on trumped up charges and couldn’t afford bail? Tough luck, civilian.”

      “Oh, you lost your car and 5 grand cash because I told my dog to sit down by your passenger door? Don’t worry. If you pay a lawyer 10 grand and wait 2 years we’ll get that property right back to you, maybe.”

  3. “No I’m not,” the trooper responds. “I’m on state property. I’m on state property.”

    Didn’t anyone tell him he was supposed to pretend those were the same thing?

    1. They did, but as a Connecticut police officer, they can’t hire anyone with an IQ over 90, and he promptly forgot.

      I mean…state cop, dude. Do they get any dumber than that?

      1. They used to get to take their cars home, too.

        1. Oh, I know. That’s how we knew where they lived and when they were on duty.

      2. The only smart American cop I’ve ever met was NC State Highway Patrol. Then again, by “smart”, I mean he was fairly articulate, caused no trouble, and didn’t issue a ticket when he could have. That’s about it. The rest are either baboons (not just in the United States), or assholes.

        1. In general, I’ve had “good” experiences with Virginia State Police. Municipal police on the other hand….

          1. State police: Just don’t be the worst driver on the road and you’ll probably be okay.
            Sheriffs: Don’t worry, they’ve got better things to do than pull you over, like evicting squatters.
            Municipal police: Your bank account is their bank account. Pray they don’t need to make a withdrawal.

          2. I’m going to go against the flow of the comments on cop abuse articles, and say that I’ve encountered a couple of genuinely gregarious and helpful cops.

            However, my only personal experience with such was in Datong, China. It’s a long story, but the cops there were very nice. Believe it or not, the cops in Saudi Arabia aren’t so bad either. Once I was pulled over for inadvertently going the wrong way in a narrow one-way alley. Cop just asked to see license and advised that it was one-way, and used his vehicle and lights to assure that I got out of the way safely. Otherwise, I’ve found them to be useless or worse in my own experience. I’m actually serious about this: the cops in totalitarian dictatorships are better than American cops in my experience.

            Closer to home, a Texas Ranger came to my wife’s aid when she had a blowout on I35 between Waco and Austin about ten years ago. She became very much more sympathetic with cops until a couple of years ago when she got a $200 ticket for going right on red at a poorly marked intersection. She’s absolutely sure it was the equivalent of highway robbery.

        2. US officers do seem worse than cops in other countries. I think there’s a bad cop culture here related to the WE’RE A THIN BLUE LINE AGAINST ANARCHY idea that isn’t as prevalent other places.

          1. Other places don’t have the same delusions of freedom.

            1. Precisely this. Foreign departments too have real baboons within their ranks, but nobody resists their rabid behavior. That’s the difference.

              1. You WILL respect my authoritah!

      3. Yes, you can. Bernie supporters prove it every day.

  4. Picard says “As of now, the prosecutor has not dropped the case despite having video evidence of police misconduct.”

    False charges, false reports, and perjury aren’t misconduct. They’re just normal police work. It’s what they do.

    1. People think this sort of thing’s fiction:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AwZ31e-oyz0

  5. Picard says “As of now, the prosecutor has not dropped the case despite having video evidence of police misconduct.

    *** facepalm ***

    1. “As of now, you will service… us.”

  6. ” the trooper then makes the asinine declaration that, “No I’m not (on public property). I’m on state property. I’m on state property.”

    It seems to me the dopes at Raw Story fail to see the joke.

    They seem to think “public ownership” provides some magical protections to the individual…rather than hand authority to an arbitrary and imperious caretaker state.

    its the same retardedness that bars them from perceiving similarities in the way BLM treated the Hammonds.

    1. This. Poor motherfuckers are bought into the myth, though.

    2. I’ll never understand how Black Lives Matter came to manage some prairie land in western Washington…

      1. This joke will never get young.

        1. Neither will this one apparently.

  7. “””No, but you’re on public property,” Picard replies.

    “No I’m not,” the trooper responds. “I’m on state property. I’m on state property.””

    Well, he’s right. As Nikki said, you’re supposed to pretend it isn’t state property though, so the proles can go about their days in a state have happy illusion.

    1. Note: Marco Rubio was arrested for being in a park after the government said you’re no longer allowed to be in the park. If it were actual ‘public property,’ then by what right can the state arrest you just for being there?

      1. Duh, someone has to ‘protect’ it from the depredations of queers and ranchers.

        1. + 1 Brokeback Mountain.

      2. If it were actual ‘public property,’ then by what right can the state arrest you just for being there?

        Because the public is everyone but you. All those people you don’t see are the public. The state is protecting the property from you on their behalf.

      3. Same reason you can put up a sign that reads: “Public Property. no Trespassing.”

      4. If it were actual ‘public property,’ then by what right can the state arrest you just for being there?

        It’s like you guys have never done this before.

        The democratically elected representatives of the people have decided that the park is closed after dusk. This process was Democratic, therefore valid. If Marco Rubio doesn’t like the policy, he can vote, or run for office an an open-the-park-after-dusk platform. If the people feel his position has merit, they will vote for him or with him and voila, policy change.

        1. Fuck democracy, and fuck the abettors in the public.

          1. This.

        2. So it’s really Majority Property, not Public.

  8. sir, we are not killing you

    The sir is a nice touch. New professionalism, and all that.

    1. Imagine that being the last thing you hear as you pass out, knowing you’ll probably never wake up again. How horrifying.

    2. While I appreciate the time-honored traditions of Opposite Day, I don’t know if would call them “professional”.

  9. Seems like a good place to post: alleged Fraternal Order of Police data dump

    Not much word on what it contains; so far people who’ve looked have just mentioned collective bargaining agreements. I imagine more info will come out when people get off of work. I haven’t gotten a chance to look, myself.

    1. also, wrt “alleged”: a Google search for its URL does not contain the page itself as a result, suggesting it has been subject to a takedown request, suggesting that it is indeed at least partially genuine

    2. I liked the note:

      Note to irritated members of law enforcement

      Don’t bother with legal threats or trying to get UK law enforcement to seek revenge. This is me playing nice.
      If you want to go nuclear with me, feel free to do so, but trust me when I say you might want to think long and hard before you do.

      I’m not known for bluffing, and I know many more of your secrets. About 18TB all in all actually, all unpublished yet.
      “I dare you – I double dare you motherfucker”

  10. “No I’m not,” the trooper responds. “I’m on state property. I’m on state property.”

    This fine man is just providing the education that civics teachers did not.

    1. You’d think his bosses would be sort of pissed about the mask slippage.

      1. “Too soon, man. Too soon.”

  11. “”Later, Jacobi recommends to the group, “I think we do simple trespass, we do reckless use of the highway and creating a public disturbance. All three are tickets.”””

    Oh man, I love these nebulous charges. “Creating a public disturbance” means literally anything so they can arrest you at their leisure.

    1. Isn’t “creating a public disturbance” what we did in Hiroshima and Nagasaki?

      1. No, we created a public disturbance at Okinawa, We violated the noise ordinances at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    2. Can you hear me now?

    3. “Creating a public disturbance” means literally anything so they can arrest you at their leisure.

      Seriously. There need to be consequences for cops who frequently make an arrest only to have the charges thrown out. Just like there need to be consequences to politicians and bureaucrats who make laws and rules that are unconstitutional.

      1. I don’t really want there to be an institutional incentive for the charges to not be thrown out…

        1. You’ve got it backwards. I’m saying there should be a disincentive to making charges that get thrown out. Subtle difference.

  12. They’ve been recorded conspiring to fabricate a report, file false charges, and conducting themselves like a street gang. I don’t think it’ll warrant so much as a warning from their supervisor. They’re police. There are no consequences to their misdeeds.

    http://www.quickmeme.com/img/4…..05e239.jpg

    1. And the three of them did this together without anyone thinking there was anything wrong with it, which means it’s basically understood within the department that this is okay.

    2. This is what I ask people who say something along the lines of “It’s just a few bad apples.”

      If that’s the case, then why aren’t all the good apples turning the bad apples in and demanding they be punished?

      1. Because it’s systemic, and I’d go so far as to say truly moral, decent cops are a small minority.

        I’ve literally come to the certainty that I’ll never, ever call the police for anything. Not a burglary, not anything. Fuck them.

        1. Because it’s systemic, and I’d go so far as to say truly moral, decent cops are a small minority.

          There’s a good probably of a non-zero percentage of the population who want to be truly moral, decent cops.

          The hiring and retention policies are designed to methodically and efficiently weed them out.

        2. Moral, decent people may seek out to become cops, but they get forced out in short order.

          1. Moral and decent people don’t seek out a job that involves throwing people in cages for choosing the wrong intoxicants.

            1. Some people grow up believing that the police help people. I’m serious. I know that anyone who has had any experience with the cops knows that to be a myth, but many do buy into it. And many of them try to become cops. Then they become corrupted, or they quit and find something respectable to do with their lives.

              1. Propaganda is strong. I’ve had to have several conversations with my boys this school year alone about the teacher-pushed definition of “hero”.

                Which is “cops, and basketball players who give money to the poor”.

                🙁

                1. I know I’ll be having similar conversations in the future with my kid. Not looking forward to it.

                2. Though even at six years old she’s picked up on my burning contempt for cops and government in general.

              2. Think of what could be accomplished if we only conditioned the cops to believe the same – that they existed to help people. If we can brainwash the people into thinking cops are good, why not turn that brainwashing onto the cops??

                1. Think of what could be accomplished if we only conditioned the cops to believe the same – that they existed to help people.

                  But that is exactly what they believe. They exist to serve The People. The People being all those people you can’t see. The People is everyone else. That is who they serve. Individuals are not The People. Individuals are just peasants who must do as they are told by the king’s men in the name of The People. Individuals are there to be sacrificed for the Greater Good. That is how they sleep well at night. The crimes they commit against individuals serve The People and the Greater Good.

      2. Maybe they’re Muslim?

    3. Those things are not misdeeds. They’re standard police work.

      1. When your routine work becomes an assortment of misdeeds, you’re officially a criminal cartel.

  13. “For extra police recorded dark tragi-comedy this morning, Oakland cops on tape telling Hernan Jamarillo in 2013 “sir, we are not killing you” minutes before the 51-year-old man they were all on top of died. His crime? Being in his room and acting erratically after his sister (foolishly) called the cops about a ruckus in his room she thought was an intruder.”

    Jesus fucking Christ. If I’m in my own room shitting on my bed while yelling “THE POLICE ARE DEMON CREATURES,” fuck off, it’s my room.

    1. No need to shit the bed, dude.

      1. That’s better than being a pants-shitter.

        1. Disagree. With one, you only have to clean and change from the waist down. With the other, you have to strip the whole bed. Fucking fitted sheets, broheim.

          1. These may come in handy.

              1. She’s on to me!

                What season is that? I don’t recall it from season one.

                1. Season two, episode six.

          2. Some of us are smart enough to have rubber sheets.

      2. I mean, there’s no need but if I feel like it that’s my business.

  14. “Picard says “As of now, the prosecutor has not dropped the case despite having video evidence of police misconduct.”

    Maybe prosecutors should be required to wear cameras when they’re on duty, as well.

    1. And caged like the slavemaking animals that they are when they shit on people’s lives by abetting unjust prosecutions.

    2. Y’all underestimate how much the elected prosecutors are beholden to the police unions for their jobs and at their mercy for their ability to do their jobs and for their personal safety as well.

  15. I’m making $86 an hour working from home. I was shocked when my neighbour told me she was averaging $95 but I see how it works now. I feel so much freedom now that I’m my own boss. This is what I do,

    ——————— http://www.richi8.com

    1. Jesse?

      1. Trickin’?

  16. “No, but you’re on public property,” Picard replies.

    “No I’m not,” the trooper responds. “I’m on state property. I’m on state property.”

    Now dammit, where is Tony when we need him? I so wanted to see what sort of pretzel shape he would twist himself into in order to reconcile this reality with his pleasantly fictional view of the State.

    1. Tony is not a fan of the police. He loves free shit from government, but not the cops. Of course he fails to understand that all that free shit comes by way of taxes, and those tax laws are ultimately enforced by the very cops he claims to despise. He’s a moron.

      1. I know, but he does love the notion of the State “owning” property “for the benefit of all of us”. I’d like to see his reaction to that theory plowing head-on into reality.

        1. Fun fact: The only private roads where I grew up were owned by a collective of shops that built themselves something like an open mall, and they were the only ones that were always usable, and pristine.

        2. Like I said above, the public is everyone except you. That’s why the cops can arrest you for being on public property. They’re protecting the property for the public. You know, all those people you don’t see. That’s the public. You’re trampling on their property, asshole.

      2. Progressives like to say they want a gun free America.

        Which is of course horse crap. Without guns, how would progressives force their neighbors to live the way they wanted them to live?

        Every law every regulation every tax is another gun pointed at your neighbors.

        Government is the gun we keep pointed at each others heads. Some people like the point that gum a lot more often than others.

  17. For extra police recorded dark tragi-comedy this morning, Oakland cops on tape telling Hernan Jamarillo in 2013 “sir, we are not killing you” minutes before the 51-year-old man they were all on top of died. His crime? Being in his room and acting erratically after his sister (foolishly) called the cops about a ruckus in his room she thought was an intruder.

    I called the cops last night (non-emergency) to see if they can tow the construction equipment that this cunt at the end of our street, parked *in* the street, completely blocking one of two narrow lanes at a busy and blind intersection. It’s been there all week, because the snow wouldn’t let him put it in the yard of the house that seems to be under permanent remodeling.

    Believe you me, I thought long and hard about not calling them, but fuck this asshole.

    1. What was their response? “Can we search your house for contraband? Got any safes?”

      1. Can we see your dog?

        1. Hah! I don’t have a dog! The joke’s on them.

          They shot the cat instead.

          1. Well, if they shot the cat, they did you a favor. Cats suck.

      2. “We already received a call on this and we will dispatch an officer to investigate”

        Whew!

        Odds are the equipment will still be there when I get home tonight.

        1. C’mon man, how are the cops supposed to profit off of strange construction material?? Gotta give ’em something they can easily profit off of when they confiscate it, otherwise what’s even the point??

    2. No, it was not the right move. You should never, ever call the porkies.

      1. I can think of two good reasons to call them: You’ve got a dead body and a damn good excuse, or you need a report to make an insurance claim. Other than that I can’t think of anything.

  18. Seems like a appropriate place to put this…

    http://thefreethoughtproject.c…..cops-kill/

    I read some of the guys posts, at times he comes off as a somewhat unhinged paranoid conspiracy theorist, on the other hand he’s got some pretty good documentation and his turning up dead days after he warned that he would be killed is a bit suspicious

    1. That’s freaky, but there are so many paranoid people who think the cops will kill them that it’s actually pretty likely one will be killed in an unrelated murder at some point.

      Plus, why would cops kill someone who seems like a conspiracy theorist? No one will listen to him, so the only way he can fuck you is if you validate his claims by murdering him.

      1. A) They are baboons.

        B) He had something solid on them.

  19. Later, Jacobi recommends to the group, “I think we do simple trespass, we do reckless use of the highway and creating a public disturbance. All three are tickets.”

    “Then we claim that, um, in backup, we had multiple people, um, they didn’t want to stay and give us a statement, so we took our own course of action,” an unidentified trooper adds….

    This bears a funny resemblance to that State Farm commercial where the football refs are faking up calls to cover the fact that they have no idea what happened, only to have someone in the stands shout “Your mic’s on”.

    1. Yeah, but at least with State Farm, you have a good neighbor.

  20. “Creating a public disturbance”

    now wait a minute you chickenshit cocksucker, you just said the highway isn’t public. where’s John Matuszak?

  21. speaking of popular misconceptions about State Power…

    ….i’ve noticed that the #ResistCapitalism type argumentation currently in vogue with the politically/economically-illiterate on the twitters and in the intertubesphere has something of a ‘standard operating procedure’ that goes like this….

    Them = “Real socialism isn’t like State Socialism at all! Its like anarchist communes during the Spanish Civil War… or like, George Orwell, who was totally socialist, and stuff like that… duh!!”

    You = “If you say so”.

    Them = “WHICH IS WHY WE NEED THE GOVERNMENT TO TAKE OVER THE BANKS”

    You = “………”

    1. “So… I guess let’s pick this discussion up when you prefer ‘real socialism’ over state socialism?”

      1. BUT YOU ALREADY ACCEPT STATE SOCIALISM I MEAN ROADS?

        1. Roads he can’t make use of, because he can’t afford to drive, because he’s taxed to shit. /Irony.

    2. “anarchist communes during the Spanish Civil War”

      Oh, the ones who murdered people who didn’t embrace their ideology or who happened to be Catholic and yet for some reason are still called “anarchists”??

  22. “sir, we are not killing you”

    Police simply can’t NOT lie.

  23. “Then we claim that, um, in backup, we had multiple people, um, they didn’t want to stay and give us a statement, so we took our own course of action,” an unidentified trooper adds….

    See, this sort of shit should be considered unconstitutional and worthy of a lawsuit because of this very reason.

    Pig: Someone said you were threatening them with a gun.

    Person: I never threatened anyone. Who said I was doing that?

    Pig: Someone.

    Person: Ok, where are they?

    Pig: They left, we didn’t get an ID, but you’re under arrest anyway because I say so and fuck you.

    Of course there never was any complaint and the cops don’t have to prove anything to arrest you.

    1. The truth is whatever they say it is. The law is whatever they say it is. The truly scary part is that these pathological liars actually believe that when they utter words that those words are Truth and Law, because as a practical matter it may as well be true. After all, they face absolutely no consequences for their lies, so their lies are effectively the truth.

      1. Everyone is the hero of their own story.

  24. From the Hartford Courant:

    Andrew Matthews, president of the Connecticut State Police Union, said Thursday afternoon he watched the shorter, edited version of Picard’s video and said that although he could not discuss specifics because of the internal investigation, the union was standing behind the troopers involved. “We support what our troopers did” Matthews said. “We respect and understand that people have the right to be in a public place and take photographs or video tape our troopers.” Matthews said that although there is “always room for education and improvement” he asked that the public reserve judgment of the video until all the facts are known. What makes our job more difficult it is when people try and provoke law enforcement into doing something that isn’t necessary”, Matthews said.

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