Department of Justice

Prison Rape Prevention: How Much Should It Cost?

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The Department of Justice has recently issued some long-awaited rules all incarceration facilities will be expected to use to "prevent, detect and respond to prison rape." The guidelines, though, come with a $6.9 billion price tag for state and municipal jails and prisons with no indication of a funding source, prompting the conservative American Action Forum to wonder if such a system is appropriate:

Despite an admirable goal, this "landmark rule" imposes a costly, complicated regulatory framework on states currently battling recurring budget deficits, offers little assurance of success, and fails to explain this new burden to the states as required by the Unfunded Mandate Reform Act.  

The administration prescribes 43 different action items to combat prison abuse. Such tasks range from "Hiring and Promotion Decisions," to the specific parameters of a "Sexual Abuse Incident Review."  Under this new rule, federal requirements include minimum staffing levels for juvenile facilities, no time limit for "when an inmate may submit a grievance regarding [sexual abuse]," and "methods to ensure effective communication with inmates who are deaf or hard of hearing." It requires that inmates be screened "for risk of being sexually abused or sexually abusive," and that post incident reviews "consider whether the incident was motivated" by hate. 

The administration cannot quantify how this regulation will reduce abuse.  It merely establishes a series of "best practices" and amorphous requirements on states and local governments.  There are no metrics for success.  The DOJ itself admitted, "a requirement for specific outcome measures would be impractical to implement."

The roots of the new rules lay in the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003, which created a commission to perform studies and to give recommendations to the attorney general to set standards. The commission completed its work in 2009, so this is a multi-administration, bipartisan effort.

While the Department of Justice cannot force non-federal detention facilities to comply with its policies, any non-compliant facility stands to lose five percent of its federal funding.

The $6.9 billion price tag is also a culmination of projections for the next 15 years, not a lump sum. The DOJ estimates that the average prison will incur an additional $55,000 per year to comply with standards. The DOJ does also attempt to create a cost-benefit ratio to justify implementing sexual misconduct policies by calculating how much a prison rape currently "costs." They put the value between $310,000 and $480,000 per victim, even more for juveniles. The language the DOJ uses for the evaluation is full of jargon and references to the effects on human dignity. It doesn't state if any actual legal settlements for prison rape cases may have contributed to the estimate. If it did, you'd think they'd state it outright, as it makes a more compelling case for any recalcitrant prisons to comply. (If you would like to read 268 pages of the guidelines and the Department of Justice responding to various concerns about them, you can view the rules here [pdf].)

The lack of measurable goals or even firm standards presents more of a challenge. The DOJ tells prisons and jails that they need to have solid enough staffing levels to comply with the provisions set forth in their regulations, but it's not able to standardize what those staffing levels should be for adult jails and prisons, given that states have different guidelines (and sometimes laws) overseeing staffing numbers. If a prison has to hire a new guard or employee to meet the DOJ's rape prevention standards, there goes that cost average. The very first provision requires designating a point person to coordinate compliance. In some cases that might require a new position. One comment received by the DOJ asked if such guidelines might run afoul of the 10th Amendment, but given that the guidelines are totally "voluntary" ("So, I guess you don't need that federal funding then?"), there's probably not much recourse.

The introduction to the new rules even recognizes that if prisons are successful, one of the results might be an increased willingness by inmates to report sexual abuse and therefore the incident numbers could actually increase, which is a nice way of setting yourself up to call the standards successful no matter the outcome.

A study from 2008 showed that 10 percent of all inmates had faced some sort of sexual misconduct (half from prison staff) while imprisoned, so arguably there's a need for government action in this area. Sadly, though, imprisoning fewer people to make it easier to monitor and prevent sexual misconduct is an idea far beyond the reaches of these rules.

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  1. Maybe if all those expensive guards did some, you know, guarding, this would not happen so much?

    1. Indeed. Unfortunately, “The Guards” are nothing more than the prison gang that gets to sleep outside the prison walls every night.

      1. And, if said guards are in California, collect a six-figure paycheck every year.

      2. Isn’t that the way G. Gordon Liddy described them when he had a radio show? Something about sleeping outside and volunteering to be in prison for 20 years.

        1. “People who out themselves in prison for a living.” I was traveling a lot in those days. What a gem he was when I found him on the radio. Very entertaining.

    2. Wait a minute. I’ve seen several violence fantasies here regarding a certain ex-Penn State football coach and his upcoming prison experience. Prison rape is bad now? I’m confused.

      1. There’s a lot of Ohio fans here.

      2. They sang Another Brick in the Wall for him when he arrived.

      3. The sad thing is we’ll never know the full extent of Sandusky’s masterplan!

        1. My guess? Hold little, at-risk boy assholes hostage until the money was stowed safely on the getaway helicopter.

          In the end, it was all just about the money.

      4. Charles Dickens sucks.

      5. Well, most prisoners aren’t in for raping kids, so I wouldn’t exactly call it an inconsistent position.

    3. for something like that, you’d need to keep those prisoners locked in a place where they are subject to constant surveillance. Where would we get something like that?

      1. Idunno, but it sounds expensive.

        1. I’m attracted to the idea of treating London as a penal colony.

          1. Someone call Kurt Russell and tell him to bring the eye patch.

      2. Panopticon FAIL.

  2. What about the idea of housing prisoners by size instead of by severity of crime? That sounded pretty promising to me, and likely to be cheaper than staffing up.

    1. So basically you’re proposing weight divisions like in boxing?

      If you cut enough weight before your sentencing can you get sent to a welterweight prison instead of a middleweight facility?

    2. Because only a moron would rather be in prison with the 140 lb gang member in for rape and murder than the 250 lb guy in for financial fraud.

  3. “… so arguably there’s a need for government action in this area.”

    ************

    Uh, I think the imprisonment itself is the relevant “government action.” Rape prevention in prison is just a non-additive gloss on government action already taking place.

    1. That’s true, but maybe if they weren’t giving the inmates access to video games and cable television, they’d have more money for chastity belts.

  4. Sadly, though, imprisoning fewer people to make it easier to monitor and prevent sexual misconduct is an idea far beyond the reaches of these rules.

    This should be the central point in any discussion of prison rape.

    1. ^this

  5. Don’t we live in a “rape culture”?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rape_culture

    1. At least we don’t live in a rape rape culture.

      1. The two “rapes” cancel each other out.

  6. We could legalize all victimless crimes, and take a more rational (ie, not HURR DURR KILL DA CRIMINAL) view toward the remaining criminals like Norway does. It’s more effective, and less expensive.

    1. i really like norway’s approach to police training and recruitment. it’s very professional and extensive and we could learn a lot from them

  7. *rubbing temples*

    I’m trying to understand this. Prison rape is essentially prison violence. While prison rape is certainly a specific category of prison violence, it’s not magical or special– in that if inmates aren’t supervised, they may and will engage in violent acts, some of those acts being prison rape.

    How is any federal ‘guideline’ going to magically, surgically get a handle on “prison rape” without getting a handle on prison violence writ large?

    Isn’t any attempt to curb prison rape really going to require an effective program which can just be aimed at prison violence in general?

    1. It’s easier to understand if you drop the assumption that these guidelines are intended to accomplish anything.

      1. My bad. Once again, Veep is documentary.

    2. By that logic, we should get rid of rape laws and just charge rapists with garden-variety assault.

      1. No, I think his point is that if prisoners were kept under better observation and control the prevalence of both general prison violence and rape could be reduced.

      2. By that logic, we should get rid of rape laws and just charge rapists with garden-variety assault.

        Why do I now have a mental image of someone completely covered in mushroom stamps?

    3. The whole subject is just plain silly. The way you stop rapes is…you stop raping people, duh! If prison rape is a particular problem, it’s not because of the lack of any program, it’s because of policies that deliberately promote raping.

  8. Solitary confinement for everyone, offset by shorter sentences.

    1. Yeah. It’s funny, when I was a kid and heard about “solitary confinement”, it was supposed to be something so awful…until later I realized it’s something people pay extra for, namely private rooms.

  9. I dunno. Many other governments don’t seem to have the problem with prison rape that the US does. What are they doing differently?

    1. Left off that item in their reports?

    2. Different demographics.

    3. European love isn’t like a Square’s love.

    4. I’m not sure where anyone gets the idea that “other governments don’t seem to have the problem with prison rape that the US does”.

      Just google “prison rape [country]” and you will generally find that prison rape is pretty much universal.

      1. After googling many countries. It does appear that prison rape occurs in other countries but is severely under-reported. There seems to be one exception: Japan. It seems the relative rarity of prison rape in Japan stems from the harsh discipline of Japanese prison life. The prisoners are allowed no unsupervised time and minor breaches in protocol (like talking in line or looking around) are harshly punished. The description actually reminded me of boot camp.

        1. Sodomy was a problem in the Australian penal colonies but, IIANM, not so where prisoners were allowed contact with women (eg, the “ticket of leave”, prisoners who due to good behavior were hired out to local farmers).

          Some of the sodomy might have been consensual but I suspect most of it was not.

          One interesting story has it that sodomy was more common among
          English prisoners than the Irish. The Irish took seriously the idea of the sifulness of it and refrained from the practice.

          1. si[n]fulness

      2. exactly. we see the same double standard with police conduct and many other things. it’s, as another poster commented on, reverse american exceptionalism.

        simply put, one of the easiest ways to really appreciate the freedoms we have in the USA is to spend some time in other countries.

        we are doing pretty well.

        i’ve also taken classes with cops from, for example canada, and they are amazed at some of our restrictions on police vs. their country, which of course would throw reasonoids for a loop.

        look at UOF rules for german cops for instance compared to the US

        1. Are you gonna shit all over this thread with your “see it’s worse elsewhere” bullshit?

          1. god forbid all we have here is the reasonoid fact averse “america sucks” wank huh?

            there’s a lot of elitism to go along with the self hate. how many times do we see the “most people are idiots” etc. posts too?

            sorry, if you are bitter, but facts are facts.

            it IS worse elsewhere in a lot of ways. we don’t have nearly enough freedom from state intervention, but we are doing pretty well, and we see expansions constantly (especially post heller).

            sorry, but i’m an optimist. i love my country, i love people in general (i don’t think 90 % are idiots and imo the average american guy/gal is pretty cool), i love my job, and i love robust political debate

            but yea, when europe canada etc. shit all over the concept of free speech, as well as the right to self defense, etc. i will say ‘see it’s worse elsewhere”

            and you can continue to wallow, like a pig, in selfloathing and counterfactual the sky is falling rubbish

            1. one of the easiest ways to really appreciate the freedoms we have in the USA is to spend some time in other countries.

              Spoken like someone with less than a page full of stamps on their passport. My current one is half full and I’ve only had it for 4 years. I’m out of the country for work about 2 months every year. Know what I’ve never seen abroad? Stop and frisks. Even in Muslim countries, never seen it. Saw it 3 times last week in Houston.

              Yes, the laws suck more in other countries. That excuses nothing. It’s not even relevant to the vast majority of our discussions here.

              we are doing pretty well.

              Of course you think that. Despite the fact we have the highest per capita incarceration rate in the world, you think that “the vast majority of laws are just”.

              when europe canada etc. shit all over the concept of free speech, as well as the right to self defense, etc. i will say ‘see it’s worse elsewhere”

              You’re making the same argument that republicrats make when anyone decries their newest infringement on our clearly delineated freedoms.

              1. coeus, i am simply saying it’s not as bad as the reasonoidz think it is and over and over again, it is getting better in SO many ways (MJ, gunz, etc.)

                there is plenty of stopping going on in other countries. how about instead of wanking about what you see (which is going ot be largely dependant on what NEIGHBORHOODS you are in here and overseas), look at comparative stats and get back to me

                i’ve trained with london metro cops and those guys are stoppin’ and friskin’ like a muthafucka

                we both agree that the WOD sucks, and that NOBODY should be imprisoned for what they choose to put in their bloodstream

                you of course have no idea what the people in houston were being stopped and frisked for. but i got news for you, the london cops aint treatin’ the chavs with kid gloves on, any more than we are

                we do have a very high incarceration rate, and yet we have much greater freedoms than most other nations. the former is a problem and it could be largely solved by dismantling the WOD

                but at least on the state level (where i work) not federal, drug imprisonments are a minority (by a big factor) and in almost all cases, it took at least a couple of cases before the people actually saw jail time.

                at least where i work, mere possession, with no priors is automatic probation, no imprisonment

                1. (which is going ot be largely dependant on what NEIGHBORHOODS you are in here and overseas)

                  Just how upscale do you figure the neighborhoods around shipyards are? (hint: not very)

                2. at least where i work, mere possession, with no priors is automatic probation, no imprisonment

                  Even if they have a legally owned gun in their possession?

              2. My current one is half full and I’ve only had it for 4 years.

                I have gone to Europe and Mexico and Canada…

                None of them ever stamped my passport.

                Do you have to ask for that?

                1. It depends on the country and the border guard. For example, I’ve been to Canada three times and gave the Canadian border guard my passport each time. Only one stamped my passport.

                2. I have gone to Europe and Mexico and Canada…

                  None of them ever stamped my passport.

                  Do you have to ask for that?

                  ???

                  You been anywhere this century? Shit, they even stamped it in Geneva. And that was the only customs/border security they had. Just one bored guy who stamped your passport, no questions asked.

            2. we don’t have nearly enough freedom from state intervention, but we are doing pretty well, and we see expansions constantly (especially post heller).

              For every step forward, we’re taking 2 steps back. Yippee!! some cities have less gun laws. Meanwhile there are like a dozen substances that I am now newly banned from ingesting in the comfort of my own home.

              and you can continue to wallow, like a pig, in selfloathing and counterfactual the sky is falling rubbish

              -Highest per capita incarceration rate in the world.

              -The fedgov has done away with habeas corpus (not to mention whatever the latin term is for execution without trial).

              -86% of our federal inmates are there for victimless crimes.

              If you’re an optimist, you’re even dumber than I thought.

              1. coeus if you truly believe this shit, than you are just wallowing in ignorance.

                i have offered cites. for example, the LED. where month after month, cases are presented and the overwhelming trend is towards expanding freedom

                and the ultimate right is self defense, because it’s the right that all the others rest on, and it’s getting better too

                yes, i am an optimist, and i continue to be amazed by the whiny self-hating “america sucks” wankers that populate this forum

                it simply isn’t as bad as you think it is, and i am damn thankful i was born here.

                if it’s so bad here, what country would you rather live in? what country , according to you, is better vis a vis freedoms and justice than the US

                what country?

                1. and the ultimate right is self defense, because it’s the right that all the others rest on, and it’s getting better too

                  Yet you’re against exercising it against agents of our ever-growing state. Must be good to be an agent of the state.

                  yes, i am an optimist, and i continue to be amazed by the whiny self-hating “america sucks” wankers that populate this forum

                  Must be good to be an agent of the state. It allows you to maintain the kind of ignorance that leads to saying things like “the vast majority of laws are just”.

                  if it’s so bad here, what country would you rather live in?

                  One that abides by the US constitution would be nice.

                  what country , according to you, is better vis a vis freedoms and justice than the US

                  what country?

                  Why are you asking me that? What relevance does that have to any conversation we’ve ever had? You sound just like all those team red cop fellatiators as well as all those team blue regulator felatiators.

                  “Quit whining. It’s worse elsewhere.” That about the gist of the wisdom you’re trying to impart here?

                  Yep, it mostly is. So what? It continues to worsen here and elsewhere. Where does that reasoning stop? I can totally see you saying something like this:

                  “Hey, in other countries, cops get to ass rape you twice a week. Here it’s only once. Quit whining.”

            3. sorry, if you are bitter, but facts are facts.

              Yes, and the fact is, you’ve presented no facts.

              You see, idiot pig, this is the real world where you say something, and because you’re not holding a gun in our faces, we don’t have to accept that your moronic assertion is a “fact”.

              So we ask for citations after which you lie, make excuses, and blame others for their temerity in not accepting the word of a professional thug, then run and hide, while not providing any of the requested citations.

              1. jesus dood. get a life.

    5. That doesn’t mean there’s no prison rape in other countries, just that they have no problem with it.

      1. Actually there’s probably something to that.

        Suki’s comment above is pretty close too. Other countries simply don’t keep records or report it.

        Sodomy whether consensual or not is always a fact of life in environments were men live separated from women. Add the fact that prison is an environment where the least display of weakness gets violently exploited and you’ve automatically amplified the non-consensual aspect.

        1. this is how leftists are able to promote the ‘see how good it is in cuba’ lies, too.

          they simply don’t keep stats and/or munge the ones they have so as to make you (if you are a leftist tool) accept that their healthcare system is an overwhelming success, for instance.

          the difference in many cases between us and them is that we ferret out injustices, we wank about them (as we should) and we try to make things better, given we fail a lot

          but you are right. men gotta get their groove on, and in an environment where it’s all men, there will be a lot of male-male schtupping going on

          it would of course be unconstitutional to give prisoners drugs that would decrease their libido and aggression.

          but it would be good policy, arguably

          1. Or you could provide prisoners with free access to porn. Anybody want to take bets on how much that would reduce prison rape?

            1. My bet is little or none.

              You thesis assumes that prison rape is about sexual gratification.

              Prison rape (as is almost all rape) is about power domination and/or humiliation.

    6. Letting prisoners out to rape the general citizenry instead?

  10. Wait…Obama’s trying to stop it??

  11. Rolling back the court ordered integration of prisons would do a lot to end not just the rapes, but all violence in prison.

      1. He thinks America was all fine and well until coffee got into the cream. And stopped picking coffee cotton for the cream.

        1. See that’s what I thought he was saying. But I was thrown off by the date stamp. However, it does just say “12”, so I suppose he could be posting from 1912, or 1812.

      2. Uh…racist?

        1. Are you calling him a racist or me? Because I don’t hate all garlic-reeking pasta-suckers. Just you.

        2. If it turned out that segregation did help, would that really be such a bad thing? I mean, seriously, it’s prison. If separating the races means that members of other races are safer, well, then so be it.

          1. If it turned out that segregation did help, would that really be such a bad thing?

            It makes sense. I wouldn’t want to have to join up with white-power bob and his crew just to not get raped in the shower. Plus, though I’m only half, I look very irish. Would they even let me in?

          2. Actually segregation might help. The percentages I looked at was that the most common type of rape was a group of blacks on a single white. Other combinations: white on white, white on black were lower percentages. Due to sentencing disparities and other factors, whites are the minority in prison and racism seems to be an element of prison rape.

      3. You guys don’t remember Chris Mallory? The guy who calls Muslims 3rd world savages?

        1. He isn’t wrong about that entirely. He’s just wrong in that he didn’t include the other vast majority of the rest of the planet, some of the West included, in the statement.

          1. If you look at the post, he calls American Muslims 3rd world savages.

            1. Ah, well, there is that. Though I am sure he is not Menckenesque in intellect, I can only hold out hope that is the vein in which he proffered that opinion.

            2. Wait so those people who live downstairs, shop at the same Target,dress their kids in Old Navy shit, and drive a Lexus are savages. Hopefully, Mallory suicide-bombs my building to day to save us from these scary monsters.

      4. My understanding of prisons comes solely from TV, but it certainly seems like there are often racially-based factions, and great deal of racially-motivated violence between them. It’s quite possible that prisoners would find a different basis to form gangs in segregated prisons and engage in just as much violence, but it’s at least plausible that in this case, the racist is right. There’s a big difference between mixing “black people” and “white people”; and mixing “criminally violent, racist whites” and “criminally violent, racist blacks”.

        1. OK, so who gets the better prison?

          1. White…

            collar criminals.

            At any rate, I wasn’t suggesting that prisons should be segregated, there are a lot factors that would be involved in that question, both practical, legal, and moral. I’m only saying that if there is a lot of racially motivated violence in prisons (as Hollywood suggests), then it’s not entirely insane to suggest that keeping prisoners of different races apart from one another would reduce violence.

            1. I’m pretty sure alot of prisons segregate more violent or gang-related criminals from others.

              1. you are correct

    1. So, how do you accouint for the fact that prison rape is a major problem in Canada.

      This idea that there’s no prison rape anywhere else strikes me a a rather perverse sort of American exceptionalism. I’m afraid I generally find claims that the USA is the worst just as obnoxious as those claiming it’s the best.

      1. Yes but at least Canadian rapists apologize after doing it.

        1. Ha ha the old polite Canadian bullshit.

          Some of the meanest people I’ve met were Canadians. And if you look at who ends up in their prisons you will see the same levels of meanness that you see in US prisons.

          The polite Canadian myth is something believed by people who have visited the place. People who have lived there know better.

      2. that exact attitude is all over sites like democratic underground (reverse exceptionalism).

        lots o’ libs referring to the “fascist” law in arizona for example, but it’s been the case that several european countries have had FAR stricter stop and id rules than arizona’s one, but they would never receive the moniker of fascist.

        i see that a bit here at reasonblog too.

        look at criminal justice for instance. our system is SO much better than so many others, and we have so many more rights, but that’s routinely glossed over.

        look at the crap that happens in italy, for instance, where knox’s family was CRIMINALLY INDICTED for criticizing the police investigation (criminal libel of police is a crime)…

        or countries like france, where it is a crime to insult a police officer.

        1. You can just call them what they are — ‘Papers Please’ laws. And Europe is God-awful with theirs.

        2. Or countries like the U.S., where it is a crime to record a police officer engaged in bad or illegal behavior.

  12. …any non-compliant facility stands to lose five percent of its federal funding.

    See? It actually saves us money if local jailers tell the feds to piss off.

    The correctional industrial complex should get out of the business (and big business it is) if it can’t meet its responsibilities.

  13. post incident reviews “consider whether the incident was motivated” by hate.

    As opposed to, I suppose, physiological necessity.

    1. Well, the desire to establish and express dominance would be the more likely alternate motivation.

  14. Despite an admirable goal, this “landmark rule” imposes a costly, complicated regulatory framework on states currently battling recurring budget deficits, offers little assurance of success, and fails to explain this new burden to the states as required by the Unfunded Mandate Reform Act.

    They make it sound like the government protecting the people in its custody from cruel and unusual punishment is a pipe dream.

    I can think of dozens of things I’d have the government stop doing if that’s what it takes to protect people from cruel and unusual punishment.

  15. This could, of course, all be solved if prisons were held to the same high tort standards that other occupations with special duties to their charges were. Systematic failure to prevent rape is definitely grossly negligent and every single motherfucker in there should have to pay, and pay personally.

    1. Exactly. How often do you hear about hotel rape?

      1. Is that you, Dominique?

  16. The problem is that most people confuse vengeance with justice. People want prison to be horrible. The want prisoners to rape each other. Indeed, they practically insist on it.

    The flagrant insanity of this position is something people just refuse to grasp, no matter how you spell it out for them.

    1. Those people should totally get raped.

      1. hehe. Recursive irony is the best kind of irony.

    2. I understand the visceral desire to violently punish people for doing barbaric things, but from a practical standpoint, making prisons into violent hellholes does not seem like a good idea at all. Aren’t most prisoners going to get out someday? And does housing them in facilities that condition them to behave like animals so they can survive make them more or less likely to commit crimes when they get out?

      I don’t think prison should be a walk in the park, but there should be a system in place that gives prisoners strong incentives to do productive, non-violent things with their time, like working and learning trades. Maybe then some prisoners would actually come out better equipped to exist in non-criminal society, or at least not significantly worse equipped.

    3. Vengeance is just human nature. It’s not “flagrantly insane” by definition.

      And the govt does not make prisons into violent hellholes (a hyperbole anyway). They give the inmates too much freedom, which sometimes is abused. In california they built a prison with single-occupancy rooms and no opportunities to have any freedom for violence or rapes ever. Inmates hated the place. I think it got shut down anyway because it cost too much.

  17. The prison system in the state of Texas may be starting to feel the heat.

    Yesterday, a lawsuit was filed against the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, challenging the lack of air-conditioning in its facilities. According to the suit, the high temperatures in Texas prisons violate the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, prohibiting cruel and unusual punishment.

    It is the second lawsuit of its type now facing the prisons The latest follows the death of Larry Gene McCollum — one of four inmates to die in Texas prisons last summer from what are believed to be heat-related causes.
    http://current.com/community/9…..risons.htm

  18. prison rape is way too common, and imo it’s a gross injustice that the prisoners aren’t offered better protection.

    it disgusts me when people say stuff about how they look forward to (insert dirtbag convict here) getting raped in prison for his crimes. NOBODY should have to suffer rape upon incarceration, and the state has a duty to do far more than it does to prevent same.

    first and foremost, it’s a mindset thing. prison rape is the butt (har har) of jokes. it’s the “acceptable” rape to joke about nudge nudge nod nod wink wink and it shouldn’t be

    and of course, first and foremost, we shouldn’t BE incarcerating a lot of the people we do incarcerate (drugs, some war on domestic violence cases etc.) and we can absolute eliminate the chances of person Y being raped in prison by not incarcerating them i nthe first place for a victimless crime.

    prison rape is less common than teevee and movies would have you believe, but it’s still too prevalent

  19. Some steps to drastically reduce prison rape:

    1) Release everyone in prison for the WoD.

    2) Allow prisoners the opportunity to work to earn enough money to purchase porn.

    3) Legalize prostitution. Allow prisoners the opportunity to work to earn enough money to hire prostitutes.

    4) Any prisoner caught raping another inmate goes into solitary confinement for the remainder of their sentence.

    1. They should really downgrade crimes with victims, but where the perp is not a serious danger, to non-prison punishments. Whether that means miscellaneous restrictions, or corporal punishment, or whatever.

  20. What ever it costs man, just do it.

    http://www.Anony-World.tk

  21. “Spoken like someone with less than a page full of stamps on their passport. My current one is half full and I’ve only had it for 4 years. I’m out of the country for work about 2 months every year. Know what I’ve never seen abroad? Stop and frisks. Even in Muslim countries, never seen it. Saw it 3 times last week in Houston.”

    To be fair, that’s not representative of reality. An example would be law enforcement on Limey Island — British cops can stop you, demand personal information and documentation to verify it, and search your person or vehicle with absolutely no cause. PC Johnny McEnglishguy decides you’re a fishy-looking negro, he can stop you on the street and throw you in a cell if you don’t suck his cock on the spot, or if you refuse to tell him where you live or show him what’s in your pocket.

    As if that weren’t bad enough, Limey LE also have the power to scrap your car if they think your road violation/s is/are bad enough. Just like that.

    In Jordan, for an example of a Muslim country, police can flog you for disrespectful behavior.

    Of course, how bad or how good we are does not depend on anywhere else, and we shouldn’t be basing our standards of freedom and justice on anything but absolutes.

    1. And I honestly don’t know how you could have gone a single day in England or France, for instance (ones I’ve experienced personally), without seeing random stop-and-search routines. It makes the NYPD look like the Minutemen.

      1. – British cops can stop you, demand personal information and documentation to verify it, and search your person or vehicle with absolutely no cause.

        As opposed to here, where they’re legally required to say something like “there have been burglaries in the area” before they do all that shit.

        As if that weren’t bad enough, Limey LE also have the power to scrap your car if they think your road violation/s is/are bad enough. Just like that.

        In many places they do that to johns (prostitution laws) here. Otherwise, they just steal it instead of scrapping it, and force you to prove it wasn’t involved in a crime at great cost to yourself.

        In Jordan, for an example of a Muslim country, police can flog you for disrespectful behavior.

        Check out that story yesterday about Austin and the contempt of cop case.

        Look, we can do this all day. I get that the laws are worse elsewhere. And that would matter if the cops here didn’t have dozens of ways to get around them.

        And I honestly don’t know how you could have gone a single day in England or France,

        Never been to either. Not a whole lot of drilling off their coasts.

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