Election 2020

California Voters Embrace Uber and Lyft While Rejecting Rent Control and Affirmative Action

Reason's roundup of state races and ballot initiatives

|

California may consistently rate as one of the country's bluest, most progressive, most union-dominated states, but Tuesday's ballot initiative results show the state's voters are much more complex.

Voters appear to be embracing Proposition 22, which will allow ridesharing services like Lyft and Uber and food delivery services like Grubhub to continue to classify drivers as independent workers. With 55 percent of the vote counted, voters are approving Prop. 22 by 57.7 percent.

That's a huge blow to union-driven A.B. 5, a law that attempted to eliminate most freelance and contract work in the state and to force all employers to hire these contractors as workers and pay them benefits. The law has already been gutted with a host of exemptions. A.B. 5 was specifically designed to go after companies like Uber. Prop. 22's passage is a big thumb in the eye to the state's unions (and a boon to the state's many independent workers).

Voters are also rejecting Prop. 16, which would reinstate affirmative action in state government and college admissions. Supporters argued that this change would improve diversity in college admissions, but the data show that, in reality, California colleges have dramatically increased campus diversity without having to resort to affirmative action or quotas. Right now, 54.6 percent of voters are rejecting it.

Another big loser is yet another attempt to expand the use of rent control in the state. It seems like a lot of people in California understand that the problem with high rent in the state is due to a lack of housing supply which is driving costs up. Right now, 58.4 percent are voting no.

Proposition 17, which restores the right of felons to vote when they're released on parole, is also likely getting passed. It's got 60.3 percent approval with voters.

But another criminal justice reform referendum is in trouble. Proposition 25, which would replace cash bail across the state with a risk assessment system, is losing. Right now, with 55 percent of the vote counted, more than 54 percent of voters have said no.

Every incumbent governor—nine of them—who was up for reelection this evening has won. Washington's Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee was quickly declared the winner by the Associated Press as votes were counted. With 58 percent of the vote counted, he's up 59.5 percent over Republican challenger Loren Culp.

Only one state, Montana, may see a change in the political party of its leadership. Gov. Steve Bullock, a Democrat, is out due to term limits. Democratic Lt. Gov. Mike Cooney wants to succeed him, but GOP Rep. Greg Gianforte is putting up a tough fight. With 34 percent of the vote counted, Gianforte is ahead of Cooney, 49.2 percent to 47.3 percent. Libertarian Party candidate Lyman Bishop is bringing in 3.5 percent of the vote.

The other big state story tonight is that every single ballot initiative that scales back the drug war appears to have won or is currently solidly ahead. Voters in Arizona, Mississippi, New Jersey, South Dakota, and Montana all appear to be legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana for recreational or medical use. Oregon and District of Columbia voters are doing the same for psilocybin mushrooms.

Oklahoma voters have rejected a reform measure that would have likely reduced sentence lengths for some people convicted of non-violent felonies.

Oklahoma law allows prosecutors to seek enhanced sentences whenever somebody convicted of a felony had previously been convicted of a felony. State Question 805 would have prohibited these sentencing enhancements for non-violent felonies but would keep them for violent felonies. The distinction didn't appear to matter to Oklahoma voters. With 93 percent of the vote counted, the Associated Press reports voters have rejected the reforms, with 61 percent voting no.

And in Louisiana, voters have passed a state constitutional referendum declaring that "nothing in this constitution shall be construed to secure or protect a right to abortion or require the funding of abortion."

Elsewhere, there doesn't appear to be any budging in governors. The Associated Press reports that North Carolina's Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper will hold off challengers to keep his seat. In North Dakota, Gov. Doug Burgum will also keep his seat.

Utah will be changing governors, but not party leadership. Lt. Governor Spencer Cox will succeed Republican Gov. Gary Herbert, who decided not to run for reelection. Cox has the support of 62 percent of the voters, with 60 percent of the vote tabulated. The Associated Press has declared him the winner.

Utah isn't the only state that is guaranteed a new governor. In Montana, Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock is out due to term limits. Republican Rep. Greg Gianforte faces off against Democratic Lt. Gov. Mike Cooney for Bullock's seat. The polls are close, and Libertarian Lyman Bishop is running as an alternative candidate. With 21 percent of the vote counted, Cooney is leading by 56 percent, Gianforte has 40 percent, and Bishop has 3.3 percent.

Here are some more initiatives to keep an eye on as polls close westward:

  • Nebraska voters will consider a trio of initiatives to allow gambling at licensed racetracks. With 66 percent of the vote count, all three are currently being approved.
  • Oregon voters will consider legalizing psilocybin mushrooms. In a separate initiative, they'll also consider reclassifying possession of other controlled substances like heroin and cocaine as citable offenses rather than misdemeanors. With 70 percent of the vote counted, both are passing.

California, as is typical, has a host of ballot initiatives to watch:

  • California voters will be asked if they want to scale back Proposition 13 and allow for increased property taxes on industrial and commercial properties. With 30 percent of the vote counted, it's barely winning with 50.8 percent of the vote.
  • California voters will decide whether to reinstate affirmative action policies in state employment and college admission. With 30 percent of the vote counted, voters are rejecting this change, with 53.1 percent voting no.
  • California voters will decide whether to restore the voting rights of felons while they're on parole. With 30 percent of the vote counted, voters are agreeing to this by 61.8 percent.
  • California voters will decide whether to allow rideshare and delivery drivers to keep working as independent contractors or if they have to be treated as employees. With 30 percent of the vote counted, 56.7 percent of the voters want to let them stay independent.
  • California voters will also decide whether to eliminate the use of cash bail in the state. With 30 percent of the vote counted, 53.1 percent are currently rejecting this change.

The Associated Press has called Delaware for incumbent Democratic Gov. John Carney. He leads Republican challenger Julianne Murray 69.5 percent to 28.6 percent

Republican Chris Sununu will maintain his position as New Hampshire's governor. The Associated Press called the race with 5 percent of the vote in.

Here are some important ballot initiatives we're watching in states with polls that are closing at 9 p.m. Eastern:

  • In Michigan, voters will consider a constitutional amendment requiring police to get a warrant to access a person's electronic data and communications. With 7 percent of the vote counted, 88.4 percent are demanding to see a warrant.
  • In Oklahoma, voters will consider some sentencing reform. Current Oklahoma law allows prosecutors to seek an enhanced sentence for any defendant who has previously been convicted of a felony. Under Question 805, this will only be the case for violent felonies. If passed, a person's non-violent felony convictions cannot be used to enhance sentences for subsequent convictions for non-violent felonies. So far voters are rejecting the change. With 68 percent of the vote counted, 58.8 percent have voted no.
  • In Illinois, voters will consider whether they'll change the state's flat income tax to a graduated tax rate that increases for people with higher incomes. With just 8 percent of the vote counted, Illinois voters are resting the change, with 55.4 percent voting no.
  • In Colorado, voters will decide whether to allow the expansion of gambling in three cities. With 48 percent of the vote counted, voters are in favor by 69.8 percent.
  • Also in Colorado, voters will decide whether to create a plan to reintroduce gray wolves on public lands. Voting is currently split. It's barely winning by 50.6 percent of the vote.
  • In addition, Colorado voters will consider whether to reduce the state's income tax, and separately to increase tobacco taxes. Right now, with 48 percent of the vote counted, both proposals are passing.
  • Maryland voters will consider whether to allow for sports and events betting and use the revenue raised for education. In early voting (Just 4 percent), voters want to see more betting.
  • Arizona voters will consider whether to legalize recreational marijuana. Very early returns (3 percent) has approval ahead by 60 percent.

West Virginia's Republican Gov. Jim Justice and Vermont's Republican Gov. Phil Scott were both declared winners immediately after polls closed in their states, easily holding off challengers, according to Decision Desk HQ.

As more states' polls close at 8 p.m., here are some of the big ballot initiatives and initiatives we're following this evening:

  • In New Jersey, voters will be deciding whether the state will legalize recreational use of marijuana. As of 9:50 p.m., it's the first drug-related ballot initiative to pass this evening.
  • Massachusetts voters will be deciding whether to transition to a ranked-choice voting system for state and congressional races, meaning that instead of just choosing the winner, they'll be able to rank all the candidates. Read more details on how that works here. Maine is using ranked-choice voting for the first time in a presidential race this evening. More details about this voting system—and why libertarian voters should care—here. Early voting (just 8 percent) right now has voters rejecting a transition to ranked-choice, with 53 percent saying no.
  • Washington, D.C., voters will consider whether to decriminalize the use of psilocybin mushrooms, peyote, and similar drugs. With 41 percent of the vote counted, D.C. residents are heavily favoring decriminalization by 76.6 percent.
  • Mississippi voters will consider whether to legalize medical marijuana, and whether to allow it for people with certain select illnesses or only for those people with terminal illnesses. Early voting (Just 3 percent) has medical marijuana passing with 76 percent in favor of the broader permission, not just those with terminal illnesses.
  • Voters in two counties in Alabama will decide whether the state's "stand your ground" self-defense laws apply to individuals in churches. With less than 20 percent of the vote counted, both are currently passing with more than 70 percent support.

Republican Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb will keep his seat, according to early election returns. The Associated Press has called the race with 14 percent of the vote counted. Holcomb is ahead 63 percent over Democratic challenger Woodrow Myers' 25 percent. Libertarian Party candidate Donald Rainwater is getting 11 percent of the vote.

The incumbent governors in the states having elections this year don't seem to be in much danger, but keep an eye on North Carolina's Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper. The other two gubernatorial races to pay close attention to are Montana and Utah, where there are no incumbents running.

Eleven states (and two territories) are electing governors this evening, and political control of state legislatures is on the table in Texas, Arizona, Iowa, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, Montana, Alaska, North Carolina, and a couple of other places.

There are also 120 ballot initiatives under consideration in 32 states covering such issues as drug policy, criminal justice reform, taxes, redistricting, and election systems.

Throughout the evening look for updated results here about the balance of political power within states and the results of important ballot initiatives.

Polls will start to close in East Coast states at 7 p.m. Here are some relevant ballot initiatives that I'm keeping an eye on in those states:

  • In Florida, voters will consider whether to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour. It needs 60 percent of the vote to pass. With 80 percent of the vote counted, it's up 61.6 percent.
  • Also in Florida, voters will consider whether to shift the primary elections away from closed partisan races to a "jungle primary" where all registered voters can vote regardless of party affiliation and all candidates compete in the same pool regardless of party; the top two vote-getters then face off in the general election. This is similar to how state races in California and Washington are held. Like the minimum wage vote, it requires 60 percent to pass. With 81 percent of the vote counted, it's only at 57 percent.
  • In Virginia, voters will consider whether to strip the power away from the state legislature to draw congressional and state district boundaries and instead give it to a 16-member commission. With 79 percent of the vote counted, it stands at 66.7 percent approval.

This post will be updated with new information as more polls close and election results arrive.

NEXT: No One Has Won the Presidential Election (Yet)

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Also in Florida, voters will consider whether to shift the primary elections away from closed partisan races to a “jungle primary”

    And we all know how Biden feels about that.

    1. “Jungle primary”!?!?!? Isn’t that RACIST!??!?!

      1. It is now called a rainforest primary.

        1. Now THAT is more like it! Also, please beware of THIS: What WAS called a “jungle bunny” (in the racist old days) is now called a “rain forest lagomorph” (in the woke new days!).

            1. I have received $17634 last month from home by working online in my part time. I am a full time student and doing this easy home based work for 3 to 4 hrs a day. vbv.This job is very simple to do and its regular earnings are much better than any other office type work.
              See detail here…………Money90

            2. I getting Paid upto $18953 in the week, working on-line at home. I’m full time Student. I shocked when my sister’s told me about her check that was $97k. Abn It’s very easy to do. everybody will get this job.Go to home media tab for additional details.
              See—->>> http://bit.ly/Jobcash1

    2. Biden’s got jungle fever. He said so.

      “You ain’t black”

      1. Biden isn’t racist. He’d rape a black woman as easy as he would rape a white broad.

        1. I quit working at shop rite and now I make $65-85 per/h. How? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now Iy couldn’t be happier So i try use.
          Here’s what I do……. WORK 24

    3. And we know how well it worked in California: third parties are obliterated and we get the choice of two Democrats in the general election.

      NO THANKS.

    4. [FOR USA ] Making money online more than $15k just by doing simple work from home. I have received $18376 last month. Its an easy and simple job to do and its earnings are much better than regular office job and even a little child can do this and earns money. Everybody must try this job by just use the info on this page….USA PART TIME JOBl.

    5. [FOR USA ] Making money online more than 15$ just by doing simple work from home. I have received $18376 last month. Its an easy and simple job to do and its earnings are much better than regular office job and even a little child can do this and earns money. Everybody must try this job by just use the info on this page….USA PART TIME JOBl.

    6. All you anti maskers are so funny! Look what happened to Donnie Trump and the first lady, now sick with Covid. While I don’t wish anything worse to happen to them, it just goes to show how being irresponsible can lead to consequences. SMH……….. VISIT HERE FOR FULL DETAIL .

  2. “Also in Florida, voters will consider whether to shift the primary elections away from closed partisan races to a “jungle primary” where all registered voters can vote regardless of party affiliation and all candidates compete in the same pool regardless of party; the top two vote-getters then face off in the general election. This is similar to how state races in California and Washington are held.”

    Because that has not made for some stupid election results in California. It makes the primary (with the lower voter turnout) the actual general election, and the general election essentially a runoff. it disfavors the party which has multiple candidates in the primary.

    Why is Florida trying to import California’s awful political ideas?

    1. I want to know how a private part primary can be mandated by law.

      1. THat’s a good question. I say get rid of primaries altogether and have ranked choice voting in the general. Everyone has to meet the same requirements to get on the ballot.

    2. Hey! I resemble that remark.

      In CA, we’ve learned to legislate at the ballot box. We don’t need no stinking state legislature.

      What’s wrong with that. Majority rules! Same as in the school yard.

      1. That’s not legislating. That’s mob rule without deliberation or debate.

  3. Assume any law or referendum proposed by a democrat is the wrong thing to do. Degenerate fuckers every one.

    1. This is what I’ve been reduced to. I know it’s not healthy, but neither is literally burning down my own neighborhood.

  4. “In Florida, voters will consider whether to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour.”

    As a Koch / Reason libertarian, obviously my main concern today is electing Joe Biden. But I will also be hoping this initiative fails. Any competent Koch-funded economist will tell you that prosperity requires two things: (a) unlimited, unrestricted immigration, and (b) a $0.00 / hour minimum wage.

    #OpenTheBorders
    #AbolishTheMinimumWage

    1. But, but, but, where are all those $0.00/hour minimum wage folks going to live? $0.00/hour isn’t a living wage, you know?

      1. I quit working at shop rite and now I make $65-85 per/h. How? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now I couldn’t be happier So i try use.
        Here’s what I do…….WORK 24

        1. Well played, spambot, well played.

      2. But, but, but, where are all those $0.00/hour minimum wage folks going to live?

        Why, in my front yard of course. Nobody will stop them. I defunded the police after they shot my dog and then placed their boot on my neck for 8.46 minutes decades.

    2. 15 bucks an hour? Why so low? Dems want to pay unemployed people an extra 15 bucks an hour (600 a week) on top of regular unemployment checks, and extend it to next March due to COVID.

  5. “Also in Florida, voters will consider whether to shift the primary elections away from closed partisan races to a “jungle primary” where all registered voters can vote regardless of party affiliation and all candidates compete in the same pool regardless of party; the top two vote-getters then face off in the general election. This is similar to how state races in California and Washington are held.”

    The primary round is dominated by government employee unions. You’ll get to choose between two Democrats.

    Because they let us choose from a list of masters, doesn’t mean we aren’t their slaves.

    1. Would be nice if one of these so called “journalist” did some actual research into WHO is backing this initiative. Whomever is backing it, most likely, has the most to gain.

      Previous “investigative journalism” into this topic has shown significant funding by unions. I’m sure ENB and the Reason crew are scouring twitter to investigate…

      1. And what are the chances a Libertarian candidate will come in second and qualify for the ballot in the general election?

        Pretty close to zero, right?

        As things stand now, doesn’t the Libertarian candidate always makes the ballot in the general election?

        Why would this be better if it takes Libertarians off the ballot?

        1. This type of primary helps the status quo. I’m sure there is a push from the “you’re wasting your vote when you vote third party” crowd. These whiny little shits can fuck off. The hubris that they own our votes and can tell us WHO we can vote for. The saying “fuck off slaver” is appropriate and underused for these dimwits.

          1. That type of primary has been promoted as helping to break down the status quo and reduce partisan orientation. Plus in polities dominated by two parties, it helps the lesser party by producing situations in which the candidates of the majority party knock each other off, enhancing the chance of one or two of the minority party candidates in the runoff; that last situation doesn’t happen often, but it can, especially in large parties without much solidarity.

        2. Because it leaves them on the ballot in the first round, and allows them the same second-choice advantage that instant-runoff or ranked choice voting would. That is, in an election dominated by two candidates, voters in the first round could afford to vote for the Libertarian, secure in the knowledge that they’ll still be able to vote against the candidate of the top two they hate the most in the runoff, thus boosting the Libertarians’ vote totals in races where they’re destined to come in third anyway. There wouldn’t be the pressure to vote for one of the top two in the first round to make sure the other one doesn’t win, which is an effect many LP supporters claim is holding down their own candidates’ vote totals.

    2. Why is the state involved in selecting who a party chooses to run for office? Aren’t the primaries run by the government as a convenience, not because they are required by law? They should not be required by law.

  6. part of me wants to watch Illinois vote itself into perpetual tax raises.

  7. Here in South Carolina, polls close in 10 minutes, although by law, anyone who is in line by 7:00 will be allowed to vote. So final results won’t be in for quite a while yet.

    I voted by mail in New Jersey, but according to all my coworkers who voted today, the polls have been extremely efficiently run.

    1. I voted by mail in New Jersey

      Three times.

  8. Early returns looking very promising for Trump:

    up 56-42% in Kentucky
    up 49.9-49.3% in Florida
    up 56-43 in Georgia
    up 63-36 in SC
    up 61-37 in VA
    up 67-31 in Indiana

    trailing in NH and VT (no surprise)
    down (very) early in Pennsylvania, the key stone state

    1. The NYT calls Virginia for Biden, with 26% of the vote in, and Biden trailing 58-39%.

      Fine if that’s based on exit polling, but Trump is up 58-39% in Indiana with 29% of the vote in, and they haven’t called it for Trump yet.

      1. Yeah, I’m not sure about VA. Kinda strange they’re calling it for Biden with those results.

        1. It’s the rural and southwest Virginia counties they count first, hence Trump’s lead, once they count NoVa and now the Richmond suburbs, it will go poof.

    2. I thought Arizona was the key “stoned” state this election.

  9. Wow! Florida is going to come down to the wire! At 80% and it’s within 20k votes. I’m not sure the country can stomach Bush-Gore fiasco again…

    1. Trump pretty much has Florida locked up now.
      Leading 50.3-48.7%, with 89% reporting, and the conservative panhandle districts remaining.

      1. Yeah, seeing that now. Biden has early leads in NC and OH too. It’ll be interesting if those shrink, as well.

        Biden with slight lead in TX, but I’m guessing that is related to early vote count.

        Sometimes, I wonder if the big cities get counted first; which lean blue. Then the rural county numbers come in; which lean hard red.

  10. “In Virginia, voters will consider whether to strip the power away from the state legislature to draw congressional and state district boundaries and instead give it to a 16-member commission. With 1 percent of the vote counted, it stands at 71 percent approval.”

    Strangely enough, the Democrats who control the State legislature opposed this ballot initiative.

    1. It still has a strong lead at 66-34.
      Also Arlington (~$145M), Fairfax (~$440M) and Loudoun (~$310M) are well on their way to approving bonds for various projects.

      1. Has there ever been a bond issue that wasn’t approved by voters in strongly democrat counties. They seem to not understand that they will be the ones paying for it in the end.

        1. Maybe not if Biden wins.

  11. Guess who is causing chaos with “mostly peaceful protesting” in DC. This is my shocked face…

    https://www.the-sun.com/news/1738968/dc-cops-clash-with-blm-and-antifa-protesters-outside-white-house/

    FYI – these idiots helped elect Trump. I hope they know that.

    1. No, they don’t.

  12. AZ early voting results are in: Biden with 140k lead. Will it hold?

  13. Not looking good for biden or democrats.

  14. I predicted 279-259 for Trump yesterday, assuming he takes FL, PA and OH. Those 3 are falling into place, but some I might have gotten wrong:

    Iowa going to Biden right now (Trump down to 273)
    Arizona going to Biden right now (Trump down to 262)
    Michigan going to Trump right now (Trump back to 278)
    Wisconsin going to Trump right now (Trump up to 288)

    1. Ohio is in the bag now too, Trump up 53-45 with 85% in.

  15. Will go down to PA it looks like. Even if Biden wins, it will be very narrowly and not the landslide we’ve been hearing about for the past few months at least.

    1. And the choppers are flying in SF!
      The market (retailers) boarded up the windows over the last couple of days, and you can bet it was not in fear of pro-Trump rioters if Joe the ho won.

    2. BTW, if there was the Biden ‘landslide’, the media would now be jumping up and down, there would be orgies on the street corners, and no need for the choppers (you can cover that with portable cams)

      1. Yeah, they wouldn’t be able to contain their jubilation.

        The couple of minutes (that I’d like to have back) I spent watching live feeds of the MSM showed them as quite snippy and on edge. They couldn’t contain their contempt.

        The tears, if T wins, will contribute to rising sea levels more than melting ice.

  16. If you’re considering playing poker online, you will want to win or at least break even on your session. Nobody wants to lose when the play https://199.192.31.67 or money. The advice below are things to consider before you enter an online cash game or tournament.

  17. Situs poker ini tidak lupa memberikan promo bonus poker online dari Situs poker ini untuk semua player poker Asia 2020. Jangan takut untuk bergabung dengan naga poker karena Situs poker ini telah terbukti terpercaya 100% secure dan aman diantara website game poker online lainnya. Link alternatif Situs poker ini 2020 terbaru hanya disini. Lengkap dengan poker online, live poker, capsa susun, dominoqq, super 10, bandar ceme, ceme keliling, omaha

  18. Fuck Jay Inslee. Permanently moving to AZ looks better and better literally every day.

    1. If you stay out of Phoenix and Tucson.

    2. Inslee should be overthrown.

  19. Make $6,000-$8,000 A Month Online With No Prior Experience Or Skills Required. Be Your Own Boss And for more info visit any tab this site Thanks a lot .by follow detailsHere═❥❥  Read More  

  20. i have Easiest job in the world and earning from this job are just awesome. Everybody can get this job and start earning cash online right now by just follow instructions click on this link and abs( Home, Tech ) for more details thanks… Here is More information

  21. Very Informative! I am Looking for Sitecore 10 Online Training. Please suggest some good Place Sitecore Certification

  22. I don’t live in California but have to credit Ward Connerly and his organization ACRI for fighting to end racial criteria in the 90’s and he had successes in California and Michigan. Prop. 16 attempted to undo that success.
    Kamala Harris was a strong supporter of Prop 16, looking bring back racism.

  23. So, is the taxi cartel coming after Lorena Sanchez to get their money back?

    -jcr

  24. Doesn’t matter – they chose Biden
    They’re going to get all that stuff anyway – and so will the rest of us now.

  25. Voters appear to be embracing Proposition 22, which will allow ridesharing services like Lyft and Uber and food delivery services like Grubhub to continue to classify drivers as independent workers.
    Unfortunately, by exempting so many gig workers from the law with this and other votes, the remaining gig workers have no chance to overturn what is fundamentally a bad law.

  26. “But another criminal justice reform referendum is in trouble. Proposition 25, which would replace cash bail across the state with a risk assessment system, is losing.”

    Just because it’s called “reform” doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. People don’t trust judges. Cash bail has been a big part of ensuring freedom in America since its founding.

  27. “Voters are also rejecting Prop. 16, which would reinstate affirmative action in state government and college admissions. ”

    If there’s one thing Californians agree on, it’s that they don’t want to make it harder for their kids to get into a good college.

  28. California colleges have dramatically increased campus diversity without having to resort to affirmative action or quotas. Right now, 54.6 percent of voters are rejecting it.

    This is absolutely false, California universities grant disguised race preferences via diversity statements.

  29. Sadly, although California as a whole went down the middle path, some areas got hit more than others.

    San Diego, in particular is SOL. Our city council is now 8-1 Progressive, and the worst of the two available options in the general (I hate our primary system) got the Mayorship and has basically declared that he wants to turn us from a vacation destination into a “big city”. Furthermore, R’s lost the majority on the county Board of Supervisors, which had kept growth manageable and policies relatively moderate for two generations. Combine that with 2017 changes forced by the state onto SANDAG (which handles a lot of regional issues, including transportation funding) which basically handed control over it to true-believer mass transit folks, and the blue wave is poised to re-create all the problems of Seattle, Portland, Austin, and the Bay here in short order.

Please to post comments