Drug War

Parents of Toddler Burned by Drug Warriors Demand Compensation

A federal lawsuit argues that the botched raid was "reckless," "plainly incompetent," and "objectively unreasonable."

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Last October a grand jury in Habersham County, Georgia, concluded that a botched 2014 drug raid in which local cops gravely injured a toddler, though "tragic," was not criminal. In a federal lawsuit filed last week, the little boy's parents, Bounkham and Alecia Phonesavanh, make the case that the paramilitary assault was nevertheless "reckless," "plainly incompetent," and "objectively unreasonable." It is hard to disagree. The Phonesavanhs, who are seeking compensation for medical expenses, pain and suffering, lost income, and emotional distress, also argue that police obtained the no-knock search warrant they were serving under false pretenses. The defendants—nine law enforcement officers who participated in the raid, helped set it up, or supervised those who did—should be anxious to make sure a jury never hears the case.

At the time of the raid, the Phonesavanhs and their four children—a boy, Bou Bou, then 19 months old, and three girls, ages 7, 5, and 3—were staying with Bounkham's sister, Amanda Thonetheva, in Cornelia because their house in Wisconsin had been destroyed by a fire. Around 2 a.m. on May 28, "seven or more" members of a "special response team" that included Cornelia police officers and Habersham County sheriff's deputies burst into the room where the Phonesavanhs were sleeping, looking for Bounkham's nephew, Wanis Thonetheva, who allegedly had sold a confidential informant $50 worth of methamphetamine. Thonetheva was not there, and neither were the drugs or weapons that police expected to find. But as the cops stormed the house in the middle of the night, one of the sheriff's deputies, Charles Long, tossed a flash-bang grenade that landed in the portable playpen where Bou Bou was sleeping and exploded in his face.

The resulting damage included "blast burn injuries to the face and chest; a complex laceration of the nose, upper lip and face; 20% of the right upper lip missing; the external nose being separated from the underlying bone; and a large avulsion bum injury to the chest with a resulting left pulmonary contusion and sepsis." After the attack, the Phonesavanhs say, police forcibly prevented them from going to Bou Bou's aid and lied about the extent of his injuries, attributing the blood in the playpen to a lost tooth. The boy's parents did not realize how badly he had been hurt until they arrived at the hospital where police took him. Bou Bou, who was initially placed in a medically induced coma, had to undergo a series of reparative surgeries that will continue into adulthood. The family's medical bills so far total around $1.6 million. According to the lawsuit, a sheriff's deputy "told the medical providers that the Habersham County Sheriff's Office would be responsible for all bills incurred." Sheriff Joey Terrell (one of the defendants) publicly made the same promise. Later the county reneged.

The grand jury report, a conflicted combination of sympathy for the Phonesavanhs and for the cops who nearly killed their son, emphasizes that "the specific device involved in this matter was a 'mini-bang' and not the larger available device." The implication—that police showed restraint when they burned and mutilated a toddler with an explosive device, since they could have used a bigger one—illustrates the grand jurors' eagerness to downplay the appalling recklessness that sent Bou Bou to the hospital with horrifying injuries.

According to the complaint, Long threw the grenade into the room without looking, having been authorized to use the device "at least an hour before the search began." That authorization was contrary to "a strict policy prohibiting the use of flash bang stun grenades where children might be present."  Terrell and Cornelia Police Chief Rick Darby said the cops had no idea that children were living in the house. But the Phonesavanhs had been there for two months, and the evidence of their presence should have been obvious to anyone paying attention.

The grand jurors clearly were troubled by the cops' lackadaisical investigation of this question, saying "it should be assumed that children ARE present unless strong evidence suggests otherwise." Yet the jurors shied away from stating the obvious: that police were shockingly cavalier about the possibility that innocent bystanders would be hurt during the raid. "The evidence we heard did not reveal that nobody bothered to ask and inquire as to the presence of children," the report says. "Indeed there is evidence that questions were asked. However, when more can be reasonably done it should be, including surveillance and records checks."

report on the raid provided by Terrell implied that police did all they reasonably could to make sure there were no children in the home. "According to all the information able to be gathered at the time," it says, "there were no children or dogs at the residence." Yet the Phonesavanhs note that "a clearly identifiable case" for Bou Bou's portable playpen was sitting outside the house, next to the door breached by the SWAT team. The minivan parked in the driveway through which the cops approached the house contained four child seats and "had figures affixed to the rear window indicating the presence of a family with several children." In the yard were "children's toys, including a plastic child's pool." Even if the cops missed these clues in their hurry to break down the door, rudimentary surveillance prior to the raid would have revealed the presence of children, who frequently played with their father in the front yard. A little surveillance might also have revealed that Wanis Thonetheva no longer lived in the house and was not present at the time of the raid.

When she applied for a warrant a couple of hours before the raid, Nikki Autry, a special agent with the Mountain Judicial Circuit Narcotics Criminal Investigation and Suppression Team, claimed a confidential informant "was able to purchase a quantity of methamphetamine from Wanis Thonetheva at Thonetheva's residence," which she identified as the house where the Phonesavanhs were staying. She said she had "confirmed that there are several individuals outside of the residence standing 'guard.'" Terrell's report describes them as "a couple of adult male subjects at the residence standing 'guard' outside the door to the finished garage area" (which is where the Phonesavanhs were sleeping). It says the C.I. (as opposed to Autry) reported seeing them and was not sure whether they were armed.

According to the Phonesavanhs' complaint, which names Autry as one of the defendants, none of that was true: The C.I. "had not purchased drugs 'from the residence' as alleged" and "had not been inside the residence." The complaint says there were no guards, armed or otherwise, and the C.I. was not known to be reliable, contrary to what Autry claimed in her affidavit. Autry also cited "several vehicles in the driveway" and "heavy traffic in and out of the residence," which you might see at a drug dealer's house—or at anyone's house during a visit by out-of-town relatives with four children.

To justify her request for a no-knock warrant, which allows police to enter without announcing themselves, Autry said she was "aware of weapons being present at the residence on previous occasions." According to Terrell's report, that was a reference to a 2013 "aggravated assault involving an AK-47 assault rifle" at the house. So that's one weapon on one occasion, nearly a year before the raid. And according to the Phonesavanhs' complaint, the rifle did not belong to Thonetheva, who was unarmed and unresisting when he was arrested at his own home after the raid. Autry also cited "the possibility of the destruction of evidence." Always a possibility, of course, except that in this case there was no evidence to destroy and no one to destroy it.

In the aftermath of the raid, Autry agreed to surrender her certification as a Georgia peace officer, meaning she can no longer work in law enforcement. The grand jurors, who faulted Autry (although not by name) for a "hurried" and "sloppy" investigation, "gave serious and lengthy consideration as to whether to recommend criminal charges" against her but decided that the resolution she negotiated was "more appropriate than criminal charges and potential jail time." The grand jury also decided that Long's reckless use of the flash-bang grenade did not amount to criminal negligence.

Whatever you may think of the jurors' judgment on those points, they correctly identified a false sense of urgency as the main explanation for this sickening fiasco (emphasis added):

The zeal to hold [drug dealers] accountable must not override cautious and patient judgment….This tragedy can be attributed to well intentioned people getting in too big a hurry, and not slowing down and taking enough time to consider the possible consequences of their actions….While no person surely intended any harm to a young child, quite simply put there should be no such thing as an "emergency" in drug investigations….

No seizure of evidence or apprehension of a criminal for a drug offense warrants anything but caution and careful planning. There is an inherent danger both to law enforcement officers and to innocent third parties in many of these situations. The hard work and effort brought to apprehend suspects and seize evidence must always be tempered by the realization that no amount of drugs is worth a member of the public being harmed, even if unintentionally, or a law enforcement officer being harmed….

We recommend that whenever reasonably possible, suspects be arrested away from a home when doing so can be accomplished without extra risk to law enforcement and to citizens. Going into a home with the highest level of entry should be reserved for those cases where it is absolutely necessary. This is to protect both citizens and law enforcement officers. We have heard evidence that many drug suspects often initially believe a law enforcement entry is in fact a drug robbery. In an instant, they reach for a weapon or take an action that makes a situation escalate. This is dangerous to all involved, and neither the public nor law enforcement officers should be in this dangerous split second situation unless it is absolutely necessary for the protection of the public, which is the highest concern for our law enforcement officers under their duty.

On the face of it, these observations support the Phonesavanhs' argument that police used excessive force in this case. But the fact that such excessive force is so common makes it harder to argue that police should know it's unconstitutional. The special circumstances of this case—a baby horribly injured in a fruitless raid triggered by a $50 drug sale—make plain the unjustifiable violence that defines the war on drugs.

NEXT: Two St. Paul law schools to merge

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  1. Last October a grand jury in Habersham County, Georgia, concluded that a botched 2014 drug raid in which local cops gravely injured a toddler, though “tragic,” was not criminal.

    Of course not. In fact any citizen should be able to throw a grenade into innocent people’s houses and receive the same fair treatment these fine police officers got.

    1. Only if that citizen honestly thinks drugs are being sold on the premises. It’s the intentions that matter.

    2. Of course not. In fact any citizen should be able to throw a grenade into innocent people’s houses and receive the same fair treatment these fine police officers got.

      Not just any citizen may do that, they have to be wearing a special costume. /statism

      1. I want a special “grenade thrower” clown suit!

    3. Right, because there’s no such thing as a double standard for cops vs. civilans.

      Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to go win a surfing competition while power lifting and playing bass guitar in my bitchin’ band. Then I’ll go home and fuck my wife, Morgan Fairchild.

      Smooches

      hth

    4. “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”
      A warrant was issued, thus no violation of the Constitution.
      No one, least of all REASON writers and posters, is perfect – mistakes happen.
      Yes, the authorities should pay for the damages done but the overreach to the anarchy that would follow Sullum’s beliefs, is not worth the risk.

  2. According to the Phonesavanhs’ complaint, which names Autry as one of the defendants, none of that was true: The C.I. “had not purchased drugs ‘from the residence’ as alleged” and “had not been inside the residence.”

    I’d be surprised if there was any actual confidential informant at all.

    1. There probably was, and he probably made the story up to fulfill whatever deal he had made with the devil.

      1. Or it’s Autry’s idiot and unemployed brother in law and she takes a kickback on the pay and generates bust stats without working.

    2. There was one. He was so horrified by what the cops did that he came forward an announced to the media that he had lied. Up until that point the cops had been trying to claim that they had proof that drug deals where happening in the house.

      1. Maybe they’ll be able to dig up his body for the trial?

    3. “confidential informant” is another term for lying under oath.

  3. County Attorney, Donnie Hunt told FOX 5’s Chris Shaw, Sheriff Terrell made the comments about paying in a “moment of high emotion.”

    You ain’t seen “high emotion” yet, Donnie.

    1. High Emotion, a SugarFree / Warty joint production starring Donnie Hunt as the mutilated corpse.

  4. According to the lawsuit, a sheriff’s deputy “told the medical providers that the Habersham County Sheriff’s Office would be responsible for all bills incurred.” Sheriff Joey Terrell (one of the defendants) publicly made the same promise. Later the county reneged.

    “Kid just lost a tooth? Fine, tell’em we’ll cover it. Just shut’em up.”

    ::Later::

    “1.6 million what’s?! We can’t afford that!”

  5. Yeah, those cops better hope this never gets in front of a jury.

    Grand Jurors being led around buy a DA who actively wants to avoid penalizing cops are highly unlikely to recommend criminal charges against them, but in a civil trial with a lower standard of evidence and a process not being controlled by someone who wants to ensure the correct outcome there is basically 0 chance that the jury will look at pictures of a burned baby and not award the max that they can.

  6. What the grand jury said:

    We recommend that whenever reasonably possible, suspects be arrested away from a home when doing so can be accomplished without extra risk to law enforcement and to citizens. Going into a home with the highest level of entry should be reserved for those cases where it is absolutely necessary. This is to protect both citizens and law enforcement officers. We have heard evidence that many drug suspects often initially believe a law enforcement entry is in fact a drug robbery. In an instant, they reach for a weapon or take an action that makes a situation escalate. This is dangerous to all involved, and neither the public nor law enforcement officers should be in this dangerous split second situation unless it is absolutely necessary for the protection of the public, which is the highest concern for our law enforcement officers under their duty.

    What the police heard:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ss2hULhXf04

    1. Yeah. Seems like the best approach would be to arrest them away from the house, then search the house at your leisure. But then you don’t get to act like soldiers sweeping a den full o’ terrorists. What’s the fun in that?

      1. Seems like the best approach would be to arrest them away from the house, then search the house at your leisure.

        That’s what they do when there is an actual threat to their safety, like when they apprehended Whitey Bulger.

        They do these kinds of raids because they enjoy the natural high that comes from terrorizing people who commit the immoral act of seeking artificial highs.

      2. To bastardize something the Nuge once said:

        If some of these murderous pig thrill seekers really want to get a thrill, let’s take em out to the Middle East and let em tangle with ISIS terrorists and Al Queda Jihadis. Cleanse the soul.

      3. The best approach, if they truly believed that drugs were evil and drug dealers were scum, would be to park the cop car out front, yell through a bullhorn that they will be bringing a search warrant in an hour, and eat a few donuts, play some checkers, and generally kill time. Give the druggies inside plenty of time to flush the drugs. Catch anyone who tries to leave.

        Then casually stroll up to the front door, lots of notice from a bullhorn, no guns, nothing scary, a single cop, and serve the warrant and search the house.

        The goal of the search, of course, is to find nothing and arrest nobody because all the drugs have been flushed away. Now the drugs are gone, and the druggies owe somebody for the flushed drugs and will be in deep shit, either dead or at the very least out of the drug dealing business. All at minimal cost and danger, no jail time, no expensive lawyers, no court time wasted.

        Of course cops don’t actually care if drugs are good or bad, they just want the excuse to dress up and play soldier.

        1. You give the cops too much credit, they don’t have the brains to even dress themselves without direct orders.

          They are just mindless drug addled thugs brainwashed to carry out the master psycho’s orders.

  7. Hey come on now, they need to throw flashbangs in to babies cribs because as police chief Bob Metzger says-“At the end of the day, we want to be safe…….We all want to make sure we got home safely to our families. That’s really what I am here to help you with.”

    The police families of course.

    1. First rule of the hero’s in blue.

    2. It’s not like they were aiming for the crib. The very fact that they hit it proves this. Totally an accident.

      1. I blame the parents for putting the crib where it was.

    3. The only people deserving of being home safely are the heros in blue.

      barf

  8. OT: If only Bob Simon had taken Uber!

    http://news.yahoo.com/disconce…..25883.html

    1. Since November 2011, Fedahi’s driver’s license has reportedly been suspended nine times

      B-b-but, that’s unpossible! It’s those unregulated Uber and Lyft drivers that are the real menace! The proggies said so, so it must be true.

  9. Why the hell has this case not been talked about in length on the cable news feeds? You would think Bill O’Reilly would take up the cause for “the children”. Oh,wait,it’s about drugs.,never mind

    1. Oh,wait,it’s about drugs.,never mind

      Yep. The kid is just collateral damage in the noble war on drug users.

    2. Oh,wait,it’s about drugs

      What drugs?

    3. Also probably in part because it involves firreners with weird, hard to pronounce names. If it involved a pretty white co-ed in a nice neighnorhood being permanently disfigured it probably would be all over the news.

      1. I wouldn’t bet on it.

        Young female CI killed. Last July. No coverage.

        http://wvmetronews.com/2014/07…..stigation/

        And, if you simply must have a a pretty white female, there’s this one:

        http://www.newyorker.com/magaz…..throwaways

        1. I guess TEH EVUL DRUGZ beats out pretty white female.

  10. The family’s medical bills so far total around $1.6 million. According to the lawsuit, a sheriff’s deputy “told the medical providers that the Habersham County Sheriff’s Office would be responsible for all bills incurred.” Sheriff Joey Terrell (one of the defendants) publicly made the same promise. Later the county reneged.

    See, you heartless libertarians! That’s why we need ObamaCare! If you all were in charge, this poor innocent little toddler would die for lack of access to care!

    /Tony

    P.S. Can I hold reason accountable for the medical charges fire to the damage to my testicular tissue?

    1. *due

    2. fire to the damage

      Wait, they’re dishing out flaming nut punches now?!

      1. I am so out of here…

    3. You come here voluntarily time and again. NAP isn’t violated.

      1. But has he provided continuous affirmative consent to these nut punches? Yes means yes!

  11. Cops in Reading, PA shot and killed a man they were attempting to serve a warrant on at 4am this morning. He apparently fled through an upstairs window and was on his porch roof when he was gunned down.
    No wonder yet if he was armed or cops were just pissed he ran from them. News at 4pm.

    1. He didn’t obey.

    2. If it is the story I saw the guy was a fugitive from Tucson. Fresh out of sympathy for him.

  12. You have to maim a few children to protect them from drugs. Isn’t that how it goes. (Now let’s get busy comparing this to vaccines.)

    1. Speaking of vaccines, why the fuck does Reason keep showing measles pictures. It’s not really necessary.

  13. Last October a grand jury in Habersham County, Georgia, concluded that a botched 2014 drug raid in which local cops gravely injured a toddler, though “tragic,” was not criminal.

    If we can’t even get this to rise to the level of further inquiry, then it’s time to take the gloves off.

    1. If you mutilate my child and you are immune from criminal proceedings, I’d be perfectly content to stand trial for your brutal torture and murder.

      1. You might want to lay low until you are about 75 and then wreak vengeance.

      2. I’d find you not guilty by virtue of FYTW.

  14. Charles Long

    What has Charles Long been doing to personally recompense the family?

    1. Hopefully having his throat slit.

  15. The grand jury also decided that Long’s reckless use of the flash-bang grenade did not amount to criminal negligence.

    Ok, fair enough, I’ll play along. If not criminal charges, then what? Has he been sanctioned? Was he required to supply cake and ice cream to the department for a month after his behavior? Tell me someone will personally suffer something from this situation.

    1. He was given a time out,with pay.Booya

    2. For mere proles, “reckless” anything that results in injury is a crime.

    3. He was congratulated by his fellow feral pigs for a job well done.

  16. While on the one hand I think it would be totally awesome if some concerned citizens uncorked a bottle of vigilante justice on cops who do this kind of shit, I just know it would make things worse.

    Instead of looking at themselves and perhaps considering that the animosity towards them may be warranted, police would instead become even more jumpy and prone to deadly force.

    1. Overly-Paranoid Rob Lowe concurs

      1. As does “Peaked in High School” Rob Lowe (because most cops also peaked in high school).

    2. Instead of looking at themselves and perhaps considering that the animosity towards them may be warranted, police would instead become even more jumpy and prone to deadly force.

      Well they’re not going to punish themselves and vigilante justice is preferable to no justice at all. At the very least I hope this pig has to live the rest of his life in hiding, perhaps blowing hobos for breadcrumbs.

    3. Feral pigs are a danger to anything with a heartbeat.

  17. “FLashbang” would be an excellent name for a metal band.

    1. “In da crib” has to be the first album title.

  18. Last October a grand jury in Habersham County, Georgia, concluded that a botched 2014 drug raid in which local cops gravely injured a toddler, though “tragic,” was not criminal.

    Statism is lawlessness meets moral relativism.

  19. Sorry, Sullum, I’m too disgusted by this story to read it for the small details.

    How is the kid doing now? Was there brain injury involved?

    1. Sounds like he has to have skin grafts every so often as he gets older/bigger. I didn’t see anything about brain damage.

      1. I was worried about the medically induced coma. I’m worried that it might have some detrimental impact on a child that young.

    2. Jeez, if they would just pony up the $1.6 million in medical cost, that would at least say something.

      Were any of the officers involved parents? If so, how can they sleep at night knowing what they did?

      1. Were any of the officers involved parents? If so, how can they sleep at night knowing what they did?

        Because they’re cops. When they aren’t outright sociopaths, they’re cognitively dissonant enough to convince themselves they didn’t do anything wrong. It takes a certain type of asshole to be a cop in the first place.

      2. how can they sleep at night knowing what they did?

        They’re sociopaths.

        Or delusional.

        I can’t think of a third explanation.

        IOW, they’re all insane.

      3. Psychopaths sleep like babies, it comes from not being human.

  20. A report on the raid provided by Terrell implied that police did all they reasonably could to make sure there were no children in the home.

    Everything except for opening their fucking eyes.

    Yet the Phonesavanhs note that “a clearly identifiable case” for Bou Bou’s portable playpen was sitting outside the house, next to the door breached by the SWAT team. The minivan parked in the driveway through which the cops approached the house contained four child seats and “had figures affixed to the rear window indicating the presence of a family with several children.” In the yard were “children’s toys, including a plastic child’s pool.”

    What a bunch of baboons.

    1. It’s probably hard to notice all that shit with all their blood flow going to their loins to support their massive (by cop standards) erections.

      1. It’s probably hard to notice all that shit with all their blood flow going to their loins to support their massive (by cop standards) erections.

        Yes, all those cop-stache whiskers on bodies jiggling in body armor must’ve grown by a millimeter in mere seconds while climaxing playing soldier.

    2. Don’t insult baboons. They rarely use flash grenades.

    3. Look, if they were to fall for the old ‘toys in the front yard’ ploy, then every sleazy drug hideout would look like a Toys ‘R’ Us store. To be safe, the police shouldn’t assume kids are present even if kids themselves are actually playing in the yard.

  21. Do these police live in some macho/action-movie fantasy world?

    Dude, this is not Rambo. You don’t need to toss grenades into people’s homes.

    1. More the pity that the home owner didn’t have a shotgun to kill the feral pig throwing the grenade. Then another 8 shells to finish off the rest of the feral herd. The pigs obviously were beyond ignorant, it would have been shooting gallery of pork.

      OO buckshot will ruin a pigs day.

  22. That grand jury either fucked up big time, or they were afraid of the pigs attacking their families with incendiaries.

    -jcr

  23. According to the lawsuit, a sheriff’s deputy “told the medical providers that the Habersham County Sheriff’s Office would be responsible for all bills incurred.” Sheriff Joey Terrell (one of the defendants) publicly made the same promise. Later the county reneged.

    If it was my hospital that was going to have to eat a seven figure loss, I’d be suing the County for breach of an equitable/implied contract.

    1. This. This with a bullet.

  24. Justice:

    Take all those who planned, supervised, authorized, and participated in this raid and duct tape a flashbang to their face. Then pull the pin.

    That’s what “an eye for an eye” means. That’s the heart of actual justice, the equation must be balanced.

  25. And note, that’s “$50 worth of meth”, at the artificially inflated prices charged because it’s illegal. It was more likely $5 worth of cold medicine, in a sane economic environment.

  26. DA must’ve really done a number to bail the ‘officers’ out of this one.

    There should be some kind of elected DA that polices public agencies (‘Tribunes?’), with their own little police force, with their own special little powers exclusive to messing with bureaucracies.

    It would be handy, initially; but I wonder how such an institution would itself, inevitably, become co-opted/corrupted into one more part of the establishment.

    1. Make it a predatory agency, whose funding was dependent on seizing assets from the agencies it polices.

      1. Will this predatory agency be funded through taxation? If yes, then all bets are off that it will act with consumers best interest.

  27. To me, it looks like the police are way out there on that proverbial skinny limb. Of course, being that I’m nothing more than a retired, undegreed Mechanical Engineering type, what the hell do I know, especially since I still believe that 2 + 2 = 4.

  28. Every feral pig involved in the treasonous raid should be reduced to homelessness, then deported, there isn’t a American among the entire county employee’s.

    What a despicable herd of out of control feral pigs.

  29. Caden. I just agree… Patrick`s st0rry is astonishing, last tuesday I got a top of the range Land Rover Defender sincee geting a check for $6814 this last 4 weeks and in excess of 10k last month. it’s certainly the coolest job Ive had. I actually started……………

    ????? http://www.netpay20.com

  30. Sometimes you just have to smack at it.

    http://www.AnonVPN.ga

  31. We’ve seen this all with Waco, flash grenades, trumped up drug charges, disregard for children, false pretenses for a no knock warrant, and special teams. Welcome to the new age of “security”

  32. The mother has been saying that she knew about the drugs, and kept the kids away from that area. Their room was a converted garage, and before Georgia, they’d been staying in motels after their apt in Wisconsin burned down. I think they’ve been sketchy for a long time, and knew their relatives were sketchy.
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/…..d/9758257/

    Not that the police weren’t paramilitary thugs.

  33. A CHILD,or ANYONE seriously injured over the alleged sale of $50 worth of drugs strikes me as ridiculous beyond belief. The police involved in what is, in my view, a case of criminal stupidity should be fired and prosecuted for the criminal stupidity they are obviously guilty of. Additionally, they and the jurisdiction should be held financially liable, WITHOUT LIMIT.I expect,of course, that most likely, nothing of the sort above mentioned will happen. We should see the results I described though, and as I’m a truly wonderful fellow it would be nice for me to win the Power Ball drawing too. I realize that that ending is unlikely of achievement, especially given that I don’t buy a ticket. It would be nice though

  34. Grand Juries are nothing more than kangaroo courts designed to produce the desired verdict. The government is the enemy and that includes cops, prosecutors, and judges.

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