Police Abuse

Jail Guard Beats Inmate to Death, Fibs, and Nothing Else Happens

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Angel Ramirez, 50, was an inmate in New York's Rikers Island jail because he failed to make bail on two misdemeanor charges. He was delirious, experiencing withdrawal from heroin and alcohol. He tried to punch a guard. He missed.

All that was previously known was that a guard retaliated, punching Ramirez once in the head. The Associated Press just found out what happened next:

Then [Ramirez] was dragged away, beyond the view of security cameras, and three other guards were called in. Inmates later told investigators they heard screaming and the sickening crack of nightsticks against bone.

One inmate claims he saw the guards in the shower beating a handcuffed Ramirez, who had been hallucinating due to his withdrawal.

Ramirez … died of numerous blunt-impact injuries that included a ruptured spleen, shattered ribs and a stomach filled with blood. When a jail investigator interviewed the guards—eight months later—they insisted Ramirez was struck only once and only in self-defense.

The trouncing took place more than three years ago, but the details are just emerging now. These Rikers officers have never faced punishment for the brutal killing of Ramirez, and they likely never will:

The guard who struck him was brought up on disciplinary charges, but no decision on a punishment has been reached. An administrative judge recommended two others involved be suspended without pay for 20 days, but the correction commissioner has yet to decide their fate.

New York magazine points out that there's a pattern of corrections officers behaving like judge, jury, and executioner. In five years, there have been three such fatal incidents in the city's jails. The other two ended with a total of nearly $3 million in wrongful death settlements. 

Reason's Robby Soave this week highlighted another incident at Rikers in which a 19-year-old suffered for months from a torn artery. Authorities neglected his injuries until he died. 

For whatever crimes these individuals committed, they deserve appropriate punishments, but they do not deserve the fatal torture that their jailers inflict upon them.  

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  1. An administrative judge recommended two others involved be suspended without pay for 20 days, but the correction commissioner has yet to decide their fate.

    This would plainly be a violation of his Eighth Amendment rights.

  2. Those who don the state’s clown costumes are vile and sub-human.

    Who would want to be such a parasite?

      1. You don’t like the LibertyBot version of Libertymike?

        1. “I am LibertyBot, I am programmed to liberate you from the inferior fleshy fallacies of statism.”

          1. ++++++++!

    1. But those costumes allow them to be subject to different moral rules. That and the state’s agents are anatomically different from normal humans. I mean we all agreed in that social contract to delegate rights to the government that we ourselves don’t possess. Do you understand now? #StatismWorks

  3. Holy crap, Turkish prison administrators are shaking their heads and saying, “this is going too far!”

  4. Us Libertarians are imagining problems again.

  5. Why haven’t protestors surrounded Gracie Mansion and demanded justice from Mayor DiBlasio?

    1. If only comrade DeBlasio knew!

  6. “The beatings will continue until morale improves.”

  7. All that was previously known was that a guard retaliated, punching Ramirez once in the head.

    Why isn’t this enough to get him fired? There’s a difference between employing force to subdue someone and employing force for emotional satisfaction. If a guard is hitting people in retaliation, he’s employing force he probably shouldn’t be.

  8. Hey, he assaulted one of our exalted heroes in blue. He got what he deserved.

  9. Brian got busted on a narco rap
    He beat the rap by rattin’ on some bikers
    He said, hey, I know it’s dangerous,
    But it sure beats Riker’s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPNqojbyIDk

    1. I’m sure everything worked out fine for Brian

      1. Well, the next day he was killed by the very same bikers.

        But it beats being tortured to death in Riker’s.

  10. OT:

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com…..3988.story

    Bar calls 911 due to man with gun. Confronted by officers outside bar. ??? happens next. Police shoot. Don’t manage to kill him, but they manage to kill an innocent bystander.

    And, of course, the article mentions that the man, whose gun was not loaded, will likely be charged with the woman’s murder. Because reasons.

    1. Cops are incapable of ‘crimes’. But they do occasionally make ‘administrative errors’ like burning babies alive and sometimes they are even guilty of ‘work place negligence’ like when they wantonly discharge their firearm into bystanders.

      1. Whoa whoa whoa. Negligence implies some fault. The cop did nothing wrong, did they?

        1. Well they are human, morally superior humans, but still humans. When a cop’s gun kills someone unjustifiably, it’s the same level of error as when you or I misspell a word or trip on your shoe lace.

          1. FYI, shoelace is a compound word.

            1. Clearly, he was talking about these. One of his heels got caught on his shoe lace and tripped him up.

              http://images2.trendnstylez.co…..-Shoes.png

      2. There are no crimes against individuals. They’re all crimes against the state. Since police are agents of the state, and the state cannot commit crimes against itself, it is impossible for cops to commit crimes.

        1. What the hell is an “individual”?

          1. There are no individuals. Just the public. The public being everyone except you when you’re dealing with a public servant. They serve the public. Not you.

            1. Well I don’t know about that. Drug offenders are incarcerated, their property is seized and families destroyed, for their own good.

    2. He was apparently banging on the door of the club / bar with the gun. This isn’t exactly a “harassing a peaceful open carry supporter” here.

  11. And, of course, the article mentions that the man, whose gun was not loaded, will likely be charged with the woman’s murder. Because reasons.

    He planned it all from the start. He wanted that woman dead. The man’s a Criminal Mastermind, and must be removed from decent society.

  12. I mentioned this in the last Riker’s story: If Riker’s was, say, near Dallas, it would be a national outrage. It would headline on MSNBC. Obama and Holder would be holding press conferences about it. There would be FBI, DOJ, all kinds of feds down there to investigate. Chris Matthews would be frothing at the mouth about Rick Perry and racism.

    But it’s in a blue state. So nothing.

  13. Reason’s Robby Soave this week highlighted another incident at Rikers in which a 19-year-old suffered for months from a torn artery. Authorities neglected his injuries until he died.

    I suspect that guy was probably beaten to death too. I got to the other thread a couple days late, so I’ll just repost my comment here:

    …there’s something about this story that doesn’t add up. I want to know what caused the initial injury. From the description, I’m inferring that Henriquez had an aortic dissection that eventually ruptured. What bothers me, is that in a otherwise healthy (an assumption) 19-year-old, the root cause of an aortic dissection is usually blunt-force trauma to the chest, such as hitting a steeling wheel in a motor vehicle accident. Who hit this kid in the chest hard enough to tear his aorta?

    1. To me the question is why the police aren’t investigating this like any other homicide. Why haven’t charges been filed?

      “The guard who struck him was brought up on disciplinary charges, but no decision on a punishment has been reached. An administrative judge recommended two others involved be suspended without pay for 20 days, but the correction commissioner has yet to decide their fate.”

      I suspect the reason is because the DA’s office fears the union.

      It’s not that they don’t have a suspect.

      They seem to have more than enough to indict somebody, so why not go get an indictment?

      Isn’t that what prosecutors are supposed to do when someone is killed like this? Why hasn’t it happened here?

      What’s the hold up?

      I don’t know that there was a murder, or manslaughter, or no crime at all. But we’ll never know if there isn’t a trial or, at least, an indictment.

  14. Prison guards are even worse than normal cops when it comes to being thuggish pricks.

  15. An administrative judge recommended two others involved be suspended without pay for 20 days, but the correction commissioner has yet to decide their fate.

    Why is this an administrative issue? Can I beat my neighbor to death and get an ‘administrative’ hearing? Something tells me there’s a union involved here.

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