Police

NYPD Whistleblower Says He Was Forcibly Admitted to Psych Ward

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On Monday, I wrote about NYPD whistle-blower Adrian Schoolcraft, who recorded hundreds of conversations and roll call meetings at his precinct in Brooklyn. The recordings supported prior allegations that NYPD is encouraging its officers to harass New Yorkers with "stop and frisk" encounters and bogus arrests while encouraging the same officers to downgrade actual crimes, or not report them at all.

Schoolcraft's recordings were first brought to light earlier this month in an ongoing series of reports by the Village Voice, but the NYPD officer had been sounding alarms internally at the department for months.

Yesterday, former Newsday police columnist Len Levitt reported a distrubing addition to the story:

Schoolcraft has already paid a price for speaking out. As in the old Soviet Union, police forcibly took him to Jamaica Hospital last October, where, he says, he was kept against his will inside the psychiatric ward for six days.

He landed there last Halloween night after the NYPD came to his home in Queens and ordered him back to work after he says he fell ill and left his tour of duty an hour early.

When he refused to return, officers called Emergency Medical Service, which determined he had high blood pressure, then transported him to Jamaica Hospital, where he ended up in the psych ward—hardly the usual place for treating blood pressure problems.

His father Larry says the hospital has refused to release the records of his son's stay, including the name of the admitting doctor.

Levitt says the hospital is now going over Schoolcraft's records again, and will release them to him by the end of the week.

NEXT: Is It a "Contribution" When the Government Forces Someone To Make It?

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  1. Rubbing your dist will make you crazy.

    1. Yesterday, former Newsday police columnist Len Levitt reported a distrubing addition to the story:

      It was so disturbing that apparently it made the word “disturbing” to be disturbed. That much is true.

      1. “Distrubing” is a neologism combining the words “disturbing” and “disrobing.”

        1. I thought only schizophrenics relied on neologisms . . .

          1. Syllogist!

  2. It’s OK. He’s got a union to protect him. No doubt he will be out on disability for a spell and then back on his feet policing in no time.

    What’s that you say? The union’s made up of other officers and is sure to railroad him? Well, shucks. I guess these things aren’t as good as they’re cracked up to be.

    1. Typical anti-union sentiments. What’s wrong with you people?

      1. I overdosed on reality.

  3. Damn.

    He’s a much better man than I. Don’t think I could handle that without resorting to violence at some point after being released.

    1. +1 especially if you have a built in insanity defense plea.

      1. Ooohhh that’s a good line of thinking! I have to stockpile that one away.

        1. Every cop gets one free murder when they’re handed the badge. They just have to choose carefully.

          1. Oh, and they can’t use it on other cops, natch.

          2. And since not every cop uses his, some take three or four or twenty.

  4. the hospital has refused to release the records of his son’s stay, including the name of the admitting doctor.

    Federal law puts them on a pretty short clock for doing this. I have no idea what they point of “going over his records again” is, as the hospital is required to give him a copy of all his records. The only (available) exceptions being:

    ? A licensed health care professional has determined, in the exercise of professional judgment, that the access requested is reasonably likely to endanger the life or physical safety of the individual or another person;

    ? The records make reference to another person (unless such other person is a health care provider) and a licensed health care professional has determined, in the exercise of professional judgment, that the access requested is reasonably likely to cause substantial harm to such other person;

    1. The don’t want to release the records because it will be fodder for a law suit. Worse still, I am sure that Levitt’s lawyers will be forwarding a copy of the record to the admitting physician’s state licensing board. It is a big deal to involuntarily commit someone. And doing so without or on bogus grounds is something state licensing boards do not look upon kindly.

      1. Make that Schoolcraft’s lawyer.

    2. “Going over his records,” my ass. They know they can’t stall much longer and I’m sure the hospital’s lawyers are trying to buy time to prepare a defense against the lawsuit that is sure to be filed.

    3. “Levitt says the hospital is now going over Schoolcraft’s records again, and will release them to him by the end of the week.”

      The standard used to be that although the physical record belongs to the care provider, the information contained within belongs to the patient.

      There are questions about who the responsible party is if the person in question could be harmed by releasing the information too.

      It used to be that you couldn’t release the results of an AIDs test unless the patient signed a document releasing the hospital from liability for anything he or she may do as a result of learning the results.

      I think psych records are hard too that way. If you release psych records to a psych patient, and you know he’s planning to release that information to the public, there’s a question of whether he’s competent to make that decision…

      In this case, he probably is, but that doesn’t mean you should give crazy people the information they need to ruin their reputations as a general rule just because they ask for it.

      Usually, the easiest way to release the hospital from liability is to go get a subpoena for the records. I don’t think any hospital has ever lost a lawsuit for complying with a subpoena, and all the federal, state and local laws governing the release of information I ever saw made exceptions for complying with a subpoena.

      I had FBI guys, law enforcement, et. al. all come in asking for information on suspects they were looking for, and have been threatened with all sorts of things for not complying. They’d shove their badge in my face and threaten to arrest me for whatever–it was the only time I’ve had the opportunity to use the line, “We don’t care about no stinkin’ badges!”

      Get a subpoena. …especially if you’re in law enforcement, it’s probably as easy as making a phone call. This guy may have already gotten a subpoena, but if he hasn’t, he should. It doesn’t take very long and it makes everything easier. People don’t appreciate how hard government at all levels has made it to release regular medical information, psych records are even harder. …as well they should be.

      1. there are hoops to jump through, but in ny state it’s not that complicated. they’re dragging their feet.

        1. Another good reason to get a subpoena!

          Nothing puts a stop to foot-dragging like a subpoena.

    4. They are going over his records carefully and will keep going over them until they are accidentally “misplaced”. It’s a peril of a thorough review process.

      1. If they “lose” them, then it’s his word against theirs. No hospital wants that.

        If you have cops who are willing to say someone did this or that, or was a threat to himself or others, who are willing to go on the record for that, and you documented that, then you want to show it.

        If the hospital can’t find the records, then he’s a rich man, and the hospital just lost a ton of cash, and they’re gonna go under such a regulatory review…

        They’re gonna wish it was just a Joint Commission survey. It’s really hard to believe a hospital would knowingly do something like that, when it’s no liability for them if some cop signs off and says he’s a threat.

        Like I said, I just don’t think people appreciate the regulatory hurdles in releasing hospital information. If you’re doing for continued care, that’s one thing, and if you’re doing it to comply with a subpoena, that’s another…

        But this, apparently, isn’t either one of those…

        They may be waiting for some doctor’s legal signatures too. Some doc somewhere may be dragging his feet on a progress note he forgot to sign…

        I’m lookin’ forward to the end of the mystery as much as anyone, but my bet is that it’s about what the cops who brought him in said, and maybe what this guy might have said after they brought him in.

        1. Words of wisdom, Ken.

  5. Wow, downright scary when you think about it.

    Lou
    http://www.web-anonymity.cz.tc

  6. Remember, one of the aims of punishment is to deter others from commiting the same act…this wasn’t just for Schoolcraft, it was from anyone else thinking of doing the same.

  7. No need to think about it.

  8. Mayor Bloomberg will get to the bottom of this, just as soon as he rids the city of the much more pernicious menace of undisclosed salt content.

  9. What is scary about this is not the cops. We know they are mindless thugs. But how the hell did they manage to get the hospital in on it?

    1. Promised them some additional “referrals”?

      1. From the hospitals own staff. And, gee, awful nice place you guys got here, wouldn’t want it to burn down because the Fire Dept. couldn’t find the address, do ya?

  10. What is scary about this is not the cops. We know they are mindless thugs. But how the hell did they manage to get the hospital in on it?

    1. Do we even need to ask that question? There are plenty of medical professionals that will testify in court that broken bones a suspect received were from him tripping into the police car or falling out of his chair. There are dishonest docs out there and the one that admitted this guy into the psych ward needs to be put out of practice ASAP.

    2. Not all hospital workers are like that. I know a worker who constantly calls down her supervisors to kick cops out of rooms and refuses to give them any info on patients or take blood without consent.

      She’s got some balls. Unfortunately many people don’t.

    3. Don’t know. But ever see Changeling?

    4. The admitting doctor may have merely made the mistake of believing the police who brought him to the hospital.

      All the police would have to do is say that the subject expressed suicidal or homicidal ideation–that’s usually enough for involuntary commitment. The admitting doctor would then have to make a credibility decison–believe the cop(s) or the subject.

      1. One hell of a rock and a hard place to be stuck in.

        “Hmmm, believe the group of cops, or the other cop they brought in to be committed…..”

        Pretty much screwed.

      2. I could see keeping him under observation overnight on the word of a cop. But six days? Without some independent confirmation, that’s kidnapping in my book.

        1. Actually, unless there’s a very very credible story, alot of people with reported HI/SI get sent home unless it seems really likely they are BSing to go kill someone.

    5. “”But how the hell did they manage to get the hospital in on it?””

      There might be some reason, but I doubt they are “in on it”. The doctors are generally hostile to cops intruding in NYC.

      1. Maybe it had something to do with cops and cops, instead of cops and the public.

  11. “What is scary about this is not the cops. We know they are mindless thugs. But how the hell did they manage to get the hospital in on it?”

    Easy: The cops “explained” the situation to the doctor.

  12. When he refused to return, officers called Emergency Medical Service, which determined he had high blood pressure, then transported him to Jamaica Hospital, where he ended up in the psych ward – hardly the usual place for treating blood pressure problems.

    Well, this is NYC after all. High blood pressure, uses salt and is probably a smoker too? Off to the loony bin with you!

    1. Damn, that’s about 75% of NYC and NJ.

    2. The NYPD is just the fall guy. It wasn’t them. It was Bloomburg who did this.

    3. What? Wait. EMTs can haul you off without a court order while you’re responsive?

      1. No, they can’t.
        The Cops’ and EMT’s reports should be some interesting reading.

      2. Don’t know how things are in NY(C), but my EMS training always told us that we couldn’t transport or treat a competent, responsive adult without the patient’s consent.

      3. No. That’s called “kidnapping”, and it triggers the FBI. Which won’t happen in this case, but it should.

        1. Wouldn’t it only trigger the FBI if state lines were crossed?

      4. The sentence is vague, but I think it was EMS who determined he had high blood pressure, and the cops who transported him to the hospital.

        Either that, or the EMS convinced him he should go to the hospital voluntarily over the high blood pressure issue, and then something else happened that landed him in the psych ward.

  13. This story must be made up. Wise and professional law enforcement officers would never do such a thing. (settling on couch to watch American Idol.)

    1. Is that you Justice Scalia?

  14. If this stuff wasn’t being perpetrated by the government, someone would be making a RICO case out of this. The obvious attempt at cover-up would be admitted as evidence of conspiracy, and a guilty verdict would be obtained.

    1. If only Obama knew…

      1. I like your sarcasm so here goes some more…

        Why, so they could all have a beer together?

        Then we’d get the obligatory story of the “decorated officers” (said in a deferential tone)and why is the president meeting with them? etc.

  15. Threadjack. But this just in. Cass Sunstein is still a douche bag.

    “Sites of one point of view agree to provide links to other sites, so that if you’re reading a conservative magazine, they would provide a link to a liberal site and vice versa, just to make it easy for people to get access to competing views. Or maybe a pop-up on your screen that would show an advertisement or maybe even a quick argument for a competing view. [break] The best would be for this to be done voluntarily, but the word “voluntary” is a little complicated, and sometimes people don’t do what’s best for our society unless Congress holds hearings or unless the public demands it. And the idea would be to have a legal mandate as the last resort, and to make sure it’s as neutral as possible if we have to get there, but to have that as, you know, an ultimate weapon designed to encourage people to do better.”

    http://althouse.blogspot.com/2…..cated.html

    1. “the word “voluntary” is a little complicated” WTF ?! douchebag doesn’t begin to describe it.

      1. When a liberal says it, it is a complicated word, since it means “mandatory” while having the connotation of “voluntary” as we use the word.

    2. but the word “voluntary” is a little complicated

      No there is not.

      There is a lot complicated about trying to make “mandatory” sound like “voluntary”.

      And the idea would be to have a legal mandate as the last resort […] an ultimate weapon designed to encourage people to do better

      Ah ha! So what we’re talking about here is “Nice blog you got there…shame if anything bad happened to it. Maybe ya’ should…ya’ know…make a little contribution…ya’ know, like weekly…doncha think?”, right?

    3. “Libertarian paternalism” is just as much of an oxymoron as “libertarian Democrat” or “libertarian Republican”. Sunstein should be beaten with reeds–not voluntarily, but the word “voluntarily” is a little complicated–until he understands why.

  16. I’m taking notes here. This might be easier than bustin’ heads after all.

  17. sometimes people don’t do what’s best for our society unless Congress holds hearings

    How could anybody say that with a straight face?

    “Please direct all enquiries to the Ministry of truth.”

    1. That’s Department of Records at the Ministry of Information, and you need a form 27B/6. With a stamp, of course.

  18. I see serious legal problems on the horizon here.

    First, the EMS guys committed assault, possibly kidnapping, if they provided any medical procedure (including taking his blood pressure) and took him to the hospital without his consent. I’m assuming he wasn’t under arrest.

    Second, New York’s emergency detention law for involuntary psych admissions requires a finding that he had a mental illness which is likely to result in serious harm to self or others and for which immediate observation, care and treatment in a psychiatric center is appropriate. Emergency detention is only good for 48 hours. If they didn’t graduate him to a full involuntary admission, the hospital has a serious, serious problem.

    To get a full involuntary admission, they need to get one or two doctors to certify that he is an imminent danger to himself or others and needs psych care. Those docs just put their licenses on the line, here.

    You cannot imagine the swathe of destruction I would leave behind me in our medical staff and behavioral health unit if this happened at my hospital.

    1. Yes, thanks.

    2. I guarantee you they didn’t get the full involuntary admission. If they had done that, he would still be there. I bet they bullied one dock into signing off on an emergency detention and then just “forgot he was there” for six days. Oops sorry we should have done a full involuntary detention or let you go after 48 hours. But due to an administrative oversight, that didn’t happen.

      Not defending it. But I bet that is how it went down.

      1. For the hospital, that is the worst case scenario.

        1. Yeah. Isn’t that sort of like forgetting to feed a patient for six days? Who do they think they are, the NHS?

  19. sometimes people don’t do what’s best for our society unless Congress holds hearings

    I can’t get this out of my head. Holy shit.

    I am not, as a rule, in favor of involuntary commitment, but anybody who would say this should be in a straitjacket.

    1. Really.

      That is some truly repulsive thinking. We live in dangerous times friends.

  20. Schoolcraft made the tapes “secretly” between June 1, 2008, and October 31, 2009. He was committed on October 31, 2009. He first went to the Daily News in February 2010. The story about his tapes came out in the Village Voice in May of 2010. At the end of the article, there’s a statement that a future installment will address the involuntary commitment issue.

    The crucial quesiton will be: Did the cops involved in the commitment even know about the tapes/whistleblowing? Everything published so far shows that it was “secret” until then.

    1. One of the Village Voice articles mentioned him speaking to some review board, maybe IA…I really can’t remember, but he spoke to some officials about his concerns. It may be related, may not be, but he did speak up on at least one occasion (though it doesn’t appear he made anyone aware of the recordings) so his viewpoints were probably well known.

  21. I’ve been doing acute psychiatric emergencies at an involuntary facility for 30 years. I estimate that’s been around 3000 patients. 500-1000 of them have insisted that police are lying, everyone’s lying, it’s all made up – yet they are clearly mentally ill to anyone who sees them for more than a few minutes. Many of them claim to be whistleblowers as well. The other possibility in this story is at least plausible, so don’t impose your own narrative on it.

    It may indeed be that this guy is being set up and is perfectly fine. I’ve never seen that happen, but I allow for its possibility. But folks here are quite certain of their conclusion – with dark references to Soviet hospitals, threatening thugs, information that the hospital is supposedly hiding for nefarious reasons – that this guy is sane but persecuted. I’ve got a hospitalful, thanks – you might try sitting and chatting with them for a few years before you decide you can sense a lack of diagnosis through the intertubes.

    You might at least consider the possibility that this guy really is ill. That is statistically enormously more likely, and thus shouldn’t be dismissed out-of-hand.

    1. True enough. But where is the other evidence that he is sick. People don’t just get committed one time and get better. If he is sick, why hasn’t he had other problems? Why just this one time? If there is other evidence of him being mentally ill, I agree with your explanation because it is the simplest and thus most likely. But without that, I find it hard to believe that he could just be ill one time in a single six day hospital stay but show no signs of illness any other time.

    2. I agree, I finally RTFA’d and there is not enough info to know what really happened. I’m a criminal defense attorney and have represented clients with complex delusions about the police, the FBI, homeland security, etc. In some cases the delusions actually had a grain of truth to them, in that the person actually was targeted for harassment, but then their psychosis took over and things went way out to left field.

      1. What makes it slightly fishy is the person with a possibly complex delusion about the police IS a police.

      2. If the psychosis was that pronounced, why are the police saying he was taken to the hospital for high blood pressure?

    3. Uh, but aren’t you imposing your own narrative on the story, and being emotional and condescending at that?

      BTW, your blog is lame.

    4. You might at least consider the possibility that this guy really is ill.

      Sure, I might consider it. I also might consider that every person boarding an airplane is a potential terrorist.

      But I’ll first err on the side of statistics that 99% of the people aren’t so mentally ill as to be involuntarily admissible. And my next assumption will be that the police department is pretty bad at keeping loonies and sociopaths off the force before I start believing that they aren’t juking stats.

    5. Except for the fact that THE GUY PRODUCED HIS TAPES FOR THE MEDIA.

      So we KNOW that he is a whistleblower. That’s not open to dispute at this point.

      And that kind of makes the rest of your ratiocination break down.

      1. He only produced the tapes and talked to the media three months after the commitment. As far as anyone knew, he wasn’t a whistleblower at that point.

        1. SO?? Is that suppose to be some kind of point? The fact that he produced tapes which support his claims means he ain’t nuts.

          1. If the tapes were indeed secret on the day he was committed, then the cops who committed him–whatever their motives–weren’t going after him for whistleblowing.

            that’s the point.

            1. He had apparently been trying to change things through the supposed ‘channels’ before he released the tapes. Naturally, the channels were broken (is anyone surprised?), but it still seems to me like a threat from corrupt police against one good officer, trying to do the right thing.

        2. He was involuntarily committed by his fellow officers…perhaps there is a possibility he feared retribution for going public?

    6. 500-1000 of them have insisted that police are lying

      Giving yourself such leeway (16% – 33%) makes your stats sound more like you just made them up.

    7. So, the recordings he made were also products of his imagination? Shared hysteria?

  22. In California, it’s a 72 hour hold, at least it used to be–that’s the famous 5150.

    Before the end of the initial hold, if that’s what he was being held on, they have a representative of the court come out to the hospital and evaluate the patient. The court will sign off on holding him longer, usually, IF and only IF they consider him to be a threat to himself or others.

    The experience of being forcibly dragged into a mental hospital and held there against your will can be extremely traumatic and depressing. I’d guess that a lot of people in this very thread might say they wanted to kill themselves after they’d just gone through something like that–even if they’re perfectly healthy now. Being hauled away and locked up is a depressing thing–I bet it’s even worse for cops.

    I think we should brace ourselves for the possibility that there may be some damning evidence in those records–and despite that, we should be ready to argue that this man was treated horribly and that there’s no reason not to think that treatmenbt was related to his whistle-blowing.

    It’s just too egregious an act, falsely holding someone for that long, and the consequences for doing that are too grave for the pros involved not to assume they dotted all their “i”s.

    I’d also think we should rev up on the argument that even if this man was disturbed in some way, that doesn’t mean he’s wrong about the whistle-blowing…

    I happen to think some of the Ron Paul nuts around here are loony–doesn’t mean they’re wrong about deficit spending, low interest rates and inflation.

  23. RC Dean: To get a full involuntary admission, they need to get one or two doctors to certify that he is an imminent danger to himself or others and needs psych care.

    Of course he’s a danger to others. He is a whistle-blower after all.

  24. Gebus Kryste
    I’m surprised they didn’t lobotomize him while they had the chance.

  25. Six days is a nice long time for a search of all the possible places that he could have hidden the tapes. He must have had a terrific hiding place.

    1. Let’s just say that the corruption the tapes reveal ain’t the only thing about them that stinks….

  26. Maybe Bob Arctor got off the leash.

  27. For those who have been writing (entirely reasonable (drink!)) skeptical posts about the certainty of Schoolcraft’s position as a whistle blower and/or the possibility that he really is off his rocker, I’d like to recommend the link to the article the Radley posted on Monday.

    And I’ll emphasize this

    Now comes another set of recordings from another New York precinct that validates both the Molloy study and Polanco’s allegations. Earlier this month, the Village Voice obtained over 100 recordings of roll call meetings in Brooklyn’s 81st precinct made by Officer Adrian Schoolcraft. They’re damning.

    So, at this point there are recordings in the hands of a third party, who apparently didn’t find them completely off the wall. Still not the final word, to be sure, but…

    We now return to our regularly scheduled wild speculations.

  28. I’m just dying to see the records of his commitment. Who said he was mentally ill and an immediate danger to himself or others, and what were their grounds? If he’s mentally ill, etc., why was he released?

    Fucking up an involuntary commitment is Very, Very Bad News for a hospital. I’m serious, if this happened at my hospital, all the records would be in my office, there would be a full-on peer review of the doctor(s) responsible (with loss if privileges and an adverse report to the Medical Board on the table), and any staff involved would be dangling by a thread. For starters. Any lack of cooperation would result in a meeting of the hospital board.

    Maybe it would all check out, but the legal standard is so high, that I just don’t think its very likely at all in this case. We get people brought in for involuntary commitment all the time that we release within a few hours, because our psychs know the standard and stick to it.

  29. Shouldn’t the left have their panties in a bundle over this? People being harassed by police in the streets? Oh , wait , these are lowly citizens we are talking about here, not illegal aliens, opps, immigrants, my bad.

  30. Thank you to the few who considered the possibility that the person forcibly detained might in fact have a real illness, plus the people who seem to actually know something about the MH system to add in similar doubt. Others seem to have odd scraps of knowledge about the interface of the criminal justice and mental health systems, from which they have drawn conclusions, some good, some wildly inaccurate.

    I don’t think I can answer all the objections in a brief space, so I will try to give two examples of what I mean.

    All paranoia is based around a kernel of truth. The paranoid takes real events from his experience but misinterprets them. I’m not going into the biology of that. But a person might well have some real information that they have overinterpreted which they tried to bring to the attention of some authority – the papers, the FBI, the White House. It may have some value, but nowhere near what they think. I had a patient who had served under the captain of the Exxon Valdez and once reported him for drinking. Long before the oil spill, he was dismissed for well-documented paranoia which endangerd others because of the on-board decisions he made. After the oil spill, he developed the idea that Exxon had been beaming voices at him via satellite to ruin his credibility as to reporting the captain years ago. He believed they were punishing him for whistleblowing. What advantage Exxon got from this he could not quite articulate. He worked at other jobs for many years, kept groceries on the table, but had no friends – no one wanted to listen to his endless paranoia. His life grew steadily worse year to year.

    He moved to our state to be near family, and during the move his disability check got screwed up and didn’t arrive. He became infuriated that Exxon was tracking him and ruining his life even now, interfering with his check. He started calling their main offices and threatening them. They called the local police, and when they came over he started threatening the police. After an ER eval, he was brought to our hospital. He stayed about two weeks. We didn’t fix him, but did give him some strategies for staying out of harm’s way, a medication trial which he discontinued, we figured out how to get his check to him, and tried to put him in touch with some agencies, but he declined. It’s 10 years later and he hasn’t been back.

    So yeah, someone could be paranoid but generally functional, have real information, have a brief period of being worse requiring a short hospitalization, but not be required to get ongoing care. It happens all the time.

    The last patient I spoke to – today, dammit, for all you who think I am spinning some unlikely tale – tells us that the school she worked at suspended her in February because she had been advocating for a change in how foreign language instruction was done, getting parents excited about it, and showing everyone else up. She wears heels and is pretty – they wear sensible shoes and are frumpy; the children like her much better than the others. She is unraveling over the last months: her house is unsecured, her belongings are scattered, appliances are broken. She showed up at a previous boyfriend’s who thought something was terribly wrong and tried to drive her home (an hour). She obsessed about coffee and cigarettes the whole time – she is 37 and did not use either before – and jumped out of a moving car to run into a DD to get coffee. He brought her to the ER, which sent her here. She just told me just was brought here “because she wanted coffee and cigarettes and he didn’t approve.”

    A very likely scenario, if this guy is taping meetings where people don’t think they are being recorded, is that there are some damning things there. But he may be overestimating their value by taking the worst possible interpretation of many other comments. There may be a lot that’s unsavory, but not criminal. News sources might likewise believe they have more goods than turn out to be true. If the info is that bad, you’d think there might be at least one other cop willing to at least half back him up. Maybe there will be, but there’s no one yet.

    Invisible Finger gives an excellent example of deciding what the truth is – that I couldn’t possibly be right – before getting the data. I looked at a list my last 100 patients, which is easy to get ahold of. Of that number, 20-25 had made the sort of accusations about police, psychiatrists, or family members lying and making things up – the range is because there are cases at the margin. As I couldn’t recall that data for a few cases, I tended toward the higher estimate. But I wasn’t absolutely sure how representative that sample was compared to 20 years ago, so I put in a wide range. You could have figured out that I did something like that if you weren’t so sure I must be wrong. Thanks for giving evidence of my original point.

  31. re: authoritarian apologia

    tl;dr

  32. Huh. Crickets chirping. No one wanted to go another round?

    Prediction: when a similar issue comes up, the same commenters who thought only one explanation was possible but couldn’t get beyond insult here, will assert similar sentiments next time, as if their asses had never been handed to them. Reset button.

    Too many libertarians are just liberals turned inside-out.

  33. to much cursing

  34. Prince Georges police, MD, do this. They file false police reports against people and have them committed to Princes Georges Hospital, terrible place that actually hits patients and calls them names during the 2 minutes per day they spend away from their private practices (no counseling just try to force medicine). One male nurse, Bob, hit a patient, and they called for 4 security guards to drag a woman to her room when she refused medicine, which is her right. The doctor said that police officers do not lie or make mistakes. They are trained to fill out reports properly and add details to their lies, claiming that someone ran into traffic trying to kill themselves (first two were also lie – bomb threat over phone someone call). No one even took into account that there were 10 police cars, over 15 officers standing in the street, and a one lane street with no traffic at night (never even one accident). This follows you in your record. He should sue them and make a request for documents through the court. He can file suit and ask all of the questions he wants since they can’t ignore a court order or a judge.

    PG police officers are very corrupt and no one protects the right of the citizens. All of the lies they told – they were there less than 3 minutes (no subpoena, no warrant, no charges), but PG mental ward. They even laughed since they got away with it, since it was in retaliation after complaint was filed.

  35. Prince Georges police, MD, do this. They file false police reports against people and have them committed to Princes Georges Hospital, terrible place that actually hits patients and calls them names during the 2 minutes per day they spend away from their private practices (no counseling just try to force medicine). One male nurse, Bob, hit a patient, and they called for 4 security guards to drag a woman to her room when she refused medicine, which is her right. The doctor said that police officers do not lie or make mistakes. They are trained to fill out reports properly and add details to their lies, claiming that someone ran into traffic trying to kill themselves (first two were also lie – bomb threat over phone someone call). No one even took into account that there were 10 police cars, over 15 officers standing in the street, and a one lane street with no traffic at night (never even one accident). This follows you in your record. He should sue them and make a request for documents through the court. He can file suit and ask all of the questions he wants since they can’t ignore a court order or a judge.

    PG police officers are very corrupt and no one protects the right of the citizens. All of the lies they told – they were there less than 3 minutes (no subpoena, no warrant, no charges), but PG mental ward. They even laughed since they got away with it, since it was in retaliation after complaint was filed.

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