Drug Policy

Police Detective Defends Cheye Calvo Raid in National Review

|

Last month, National Review ran a short blurb that was critical of the July raid on Berwyn Heights, Maryland Mayor Cheye Calvo by a Prince George's County, Maryland SWAT team (article is subscription-only).

To refresh your memory, the police raided Calvo after intercepting a package en route to Calvo's home that contained marijuana.  They blew open Calvo's door, shot and killed both of of Calvo's black labs (one as it was running away), then handcuffed and interrogated Calvo and his mother-in-law at gunpoint for hours.

Calvo was innocent.  The package was never intended for him.  It was part of a drug smuggling scheme, and was meant to be intercepted by a dealer working at the delivery company.  The Prince George's County police made no effort to determine who lived in Calvo's home, did no surveillance, and didn't bother to notify the Berwyn Heights police chief before conducting the raid.  They have since apologized to Calvo for wrongly raiding his home, but have defended the investigation and the aggressive tactics, including the slaughter of his dogs.

After National Review's short blurb denouncing the raid and the overuse of SWAT tactics in general, Milwaukee police detective and former SWAT officer Kent Corbett wrote a jaw-dropping letter to the editor, in which he not only defends what happened to Calvo, he mocks Calvo and his family with scare quotes.  The letter is also subscription-only, so there's no link.  But here's the copy:

As a former S.W.A.T. team member and a current homicide detective with the Milwaukee police department, I must take issue with the tone of a paragraph in "The Week" (September 1). The piece addresses the Cheye Calvo incident, in which police raided a Maryland mayor's home looking for drugs, killed his dogs, and restrained him and his mother-in-law. It turned out the man was innocent.

I have personally been involved in the execution of no-knock search warrants, the killing of dogs during those executions, and the investigations of numerous drug-related homicides and officer-involved shootings. Yes, no-knock warrants are issued to avoid the destruction of evidence such as drugs, but they are also issued to protect the officers executing those warrants. In addition, each warrant requires a judge's authorization, and obviously the available evidence satisfied the judge in this case.

Sorry if Calvo and his mother-in-law were "restrained" for "almost two hours." Would you rather have them be comfortable for those two hours, and risk officers' lives and safety? Calvo should be able to understand what the officers did and why they did it.

Municipal police departments do fight a war on the streets of this country daily. This incident should not be considered overkill (to take a word from Reason's Radley Balko), but sound police tactics. As soon as some police administrator starts to second-guess the training and experience of the officers charged with doing these types of investigations, someone will get hurt or killed. Drug investigations are inherently dangerous, and so is the Monday-morning quarterbacking you are doing.

Kent Corbett
Milwaukee, Wis.

National Review's editors wrote a polite, well-argued response to Corbett.

I'm going to be less polite, because to use Corbett's own language, I take strong issue with his tone.  His attitude is appalling, and unfortunately, not uncommon.  The bumbling, violent raid on Calvo's home is inexcusable.  I know nothing about Corbett, but his public defense of the raid on Calvo's home ought to call into serious question his judgment as a police officer.  If Cheye Calvo had exercised his Second Amendment right to have a gun in his home for self-defense last July, for example, he'd almost certainly be dead today.  A cop or two might be dead, too.  That simply isn't an acceptable outcome—not for a nonviolent crime like marijuana distribution, and certainly not when the suspect turns out to be innocent.

Prince George's PD's lack of investigation into who lived at Calvo's home, their rush to use the maximum amount of force possible, one officer's inexplicable decision to use her cell phone to make a veterinary appointment for her own dogs while Calvo and his mother-in-law sat handcuffed, staring at the carcasses of his two labs—for Corbett, these are all "sound police tactics."  How dare we Monday-morning quarterback.  In Corbett's mind, Calvo ought to "understand," and I guess we all ought to understand, even when these incidents happen again, and again, and again.

To people like Corbett and the politicians whose policies he enforces, drug prohibition is war.  We ought to expect, tolerate, and even defend the occasional collateral damage—be it what happened to Calvo, or what happened to, say, Katherine Johnston or Isaac Singletary.  I mean, if we start getting all upset about what happened to a white, upper-middle class family with some political heft like the Calvos, we might soon have to actually start caring when this kind of thing happens low-income black people, too.  And we certainly can't have that.  Because, as I'm sure Corbett knows, it happens far more often to them.

So let's all take Corbett's advice.  Should the police mistakenly blow open your door, kill your pets, and detain you for hours at gunpoint, just deal with it.  In fact, be grateful.  We're in a war, after all.  It's all about preventing people from getting high, at any cost.  If you lose a couple of pets, or possibly a friend or relative, buck up.  Sure, Calvo and his family were subjected to needless terror and violence.  Sure, they could easily have been killed.  But remember:  Because of the Prince George's County Police Department's "sound police tactics," when all was said and done, there was 30 pounds less marijuana in southern Maryland than there would have been otherwise.  And no cops were injured.  So it's a net win.

I don't expect many police officers to agree with me on the appropriateness of SWAT tactics in general (though some do).  But this is a bit much.  Det. Corbett can look at the Calvo raid and not only conclude that the end result was acceptable, but also that Calvo has no legitimate complaint about what happened to him.  The implication is that we shouldn't bother to worry about this kind of thing.  That we should all just accept the possibility that what happened to Calvo could happen to any of us.  Because what's most important is officer safety, and winning the war on drugs.

Corbett's letter isn't just wrong, it's chilling.

NEXT: Obama: You Are Going to Be Very Disappointed

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. yea Balko – rip’em a new one! Chilling is quite the right word, its the language of the police state.

  2. As soon as some police administrator starts to second-guess the training and experience of the officers charged with doing these types of investigations, someone will get hurt or killed.

    Define “someone.”

  3. His letter is the kind of thing you’d expect to come out of the mouth of a dictator, not someone who is supposed to “serve and protect” the public.

  4. Define “someone.”

    Police administrator.

  5. see how common this shit really is

    http://www.cato.org/raidmap/

    has anice setup shows you how many of these raids go on in each state.

  6. “Chilling,” eh? The word has been used so many times, in so many ways, it’s become a cliche.

    How about:

    outrageous

    obscene

    horrific in its fatuousness

    an affront to common decency

    pig-ignorant

  7. (We’re) FUCKED.

  8. Drug investigations are inherently dangerous, . . .

    Patient: Doctor, Doctor, It hurts when I do this.

    Doctor: Then don’t do that.

  9. Would you rather have them be comfortable for those two hours, and risk officers’ lives and safety?

    Yes; with neither hesitation nor equivocation, you slimy gun-toting baboon.

  10. Radley-

    Can you provide the text of the polite, well-argued response? For novelty value, if nothing else.

  11. Something tells me that innocent until proven guilty thing went right over obersturmfuhrer Corbett’s head.

  12. Municipal police departments do fight a war on the streets of this country daily

    This reminds me of a propoganda video I saw this weekend while at the movies, just before the previews start.
    It was a song called “warrior” by Kid Rock, and had a lot of footage of American troops fighting “terrorists,” and somehow also NASCAR. This was a chilling video, and highlights the increasing acceptance of being an agressive tool/sheep for the sake of some abstractly virtuous cause, like the W.O.D.

  13. There’s a cop that used a pen-name to write articles for NR. I forget his name, but there is virtually nothing a cop can do that he won’t defend. I think it’s Jack Dunphy. Too lazy to look right now.

  14. I, for one, am tired of Radly tiptoeing around this stuff. Fer chrissakes, tell us how you really feel, show some fucking emotion, man. Don’t keep it all locked up inside.

    (P.S. All kidding aside, good piece.)

  15. His letter is the kind of thing you’d expect to come out of the mouth of a dictator,

    They all are little mini dictators.

  16. Can you provide the text of the polite, well-argued response? For novelty value, if nothing else.

    Sure. And I find NR’s response perfectly appropriate, BTW.

    THE EDITORS REPLY: We have every sympathy for officers assigned to execute these warrants – they are doing their jobs, and God bless them for it – and in some cases no-knock raids are entirely necessary. But this is not so with the vast majority of drug searches, even assuming (wrongly) that the War on Drugs is a worthwhile endeavor to begin with.

    Before employing any law-enforcement tactic, police administrators and judges must weigh the potential benefits against the risks. The element of surprise is the core benefit of a no-knock raid; this prevents the flushing of drugs and, should a shootout occur, can give officers the edge.

    The risks, however, are becoming increasingly clear. Raids on innocent persons, more common than one would hope, put law-abiding citizens through a terrifying experience. Homeowners can mistake officers for criminals and fire upon police. Police can mistake household items for weapons and fire upon unarmed homeowners. More common but less tragic are dead pets and innocent couples held for hours.

    The benefits exceed the costs when the object is to apprehend violent criminals – but not if it is to keep drugs out of sewers, as appears to have been the case here. Our quarrel here is far less with police officers than it is with legislators.

  17. Radley – great stuff. Your reasoning is impeccable.

    My question would be to this part of the letter – In addition, each warrant requires a judge’s authorization, and obviously the available evidence satisfied the judge in this case.

    Did the judge make a mistake in authorizing the raid? Did he improperly review the information? Was he given false information?

  18. Thanks, Radley.

    That’s pretty good, for those guys.

  19. That guy has the typical attitude of a cop. It is your responsibility as a civilian to be killed or detained so that he can be safe. That whole protect and to serve thing is so 1960s. In the modern cop’s view, his life is more important than yours. If a few innocent people have to die to save one cop, so be it.

    Chilling is a good word for such an attitude.

  20. The police are the greatest source of crime.

  21. As soon as some police administrator starts to second-guess the training and experience of the officers charged with doing these types of investigations, someone will get hurt or killed.

    But not, thank goodness, before.

  22. I didn’t know National Review was against the Drug War. I mean, I was under the impression that they threw every last one of WFB’s principles out the window. I guess I was wrong; good for them.

    And good for you, too, Balko. OUTRAGE is the appropriate response.

  23. Radley you are far more civil than I.

    I have personally been involved in the execution of no-knock search warrants, the killing of dogs during those executions, and the investigations of numerous drug-related homicides and officer-involved shootings.

    I note the bully’s not claiming involvement with investigating the shootings of officers serving warrants peacefully.

    In addition, each warrant requires a judge’s authorization, and obviously the available evidence satisfied the judge in this case.

    A judged rubber stamped the raid on Kathryn Johnston’s home too, fucktard. ‘Roided up cops present the warrant request and then want to disavow responsibility when the request is approved and turns out to be completely unjustified. Most 12 year olds have a far greater sense of responsibility than this, shithead.

    Sorry if Calvo and his mother-in-law were “restrained” for “almost two hours.”

    “restrained” in this cas means handcuffed face down on the fucking floor you dissembling asshole.

    Municipal police departments do fight a war on the streets of this country daily.

    Be careful for what you wish for cocksaucker. If you want a “war” thew “enemy” may start shooting first too. I’ll wager that you, like most cops who use that kind of bullshit terminology, have never been involved in a fucking war. Here’s a hint coward, in war you don’t get to go home every night after stopping at the bar for a few drinks with your fellow soldies.

    This incident should not be considered overkill (to take a word from Reason’s Radley Balko), but sound police tactics.

    Terrorizing citizens while doing no/zero/nada investigation is a “sound police tactic”. Goddam, you are to fucked up to even be allowed to possess a weapon.*

    As soon as some police administrator starts to second-guess the training and experience of the officers charged with doing these types of investigations, someone will get hurt or killed.

    Hey you self important twat, PEOPLE ARE ALREADY BEING KILLED! Including cops, you small minded buffoon.

    * Insert Standard Libertarian Disclaimer #12 here.

  24. Please chalk up the typos to anger.

    1. NO. WE BELIEVE THAT YOU STILL HAVE NOT PUT THE BOTTLE DOWN. DAMMIT, MAN. WE TOLD YOU, “WE DON’T EVER WANT TO CATCH YOU NOT DRINKING.”

      YOU’VE BEEN WARNED.

  25. “It turned out the man was innocent.”

    This casual statement reflects a cognitive error prevalent among law enforcement. The author believes it’s noteworthy that the victim was innocent. But since all suspects, by definition, are innocent until proven guilty, the victim’s innocence should go without saying. Are we to believe the mayor was convicted in absentia? The detective clearly presumes that most folks identified by the police as “suspects” are de facto guilty, and that a formal conviction in court is just official recognition of an incontrovertible truth that the cops on the street knew already. This view is deeply wrong. It’s vital every agent of the law understand that there cannot be a presumption of guilt in a free society. To the extent that we abandon this principle, we become a police state. In America, every lawman is duty-bound to presume innocence. But I fear many officers, this detective included, pay lip service to the concept.

    ALL the victims of this murderous assault were innocent, human and non-human alike. They deserve our public compassion and they deserve an apology. The assailants deserve punishment. Even the most passionate drug warrior should demand no less.

  26. I originally planned on writing an extremely strong response to this worthless cunt’s atrocious attempted defense of the cowardly and despicable acts that Mayor Calvo and his family had to endure. Instead, I will refrain and just state that I cannot properly convey the level of hatred Det. Corbett’s letter has invoked from me.

  27. J sub D-

    Bravo!

  28. If a few hundred innocent people have to die to save one cop, so be it.

    Carry on.

  29. Nothing like a Radley post to tempt me to throw my laptop out the window.

    And thanks for posting the response Radley. It’s far more reasoned than I would’ve been in replying to this prick.

  30. didn’t bother to notify the Berwyn Heights police chief before conducting the raid.

    Just a quibble, if one is investigating the Mayor, one generally has to be circumspect about notifying other local authorities lest the investigation gets leaked to the target.

  31. Fucking amazing. Mr. Corbett ought to find a new line of work. He’s too dangerous to be allowed to carry a gun on the public dime.

  32. was anyone else aware of this apparently last bastion of principle, of honest conservatism, at National Review? Are there other pockets of integrity hidden therein? I’m pretty surprised.

  33. People who invoke the word ‘war’ except in the context of an actual war should be summarily exiled to Siberia or some equally insalubrious place. I propose starting our campaign to restore the language with Det. Corbett; enjoy Novosibirsk in December, asshole.

  34. Sorry if this guy or any of his colleagues ever find themselves in a situation where the innocent property owner whose home they raid is “armed” and happens to instinctively “paint the wall with their fucking brains” when they come busting the door down leaving their wives and children in “agonizing sorrow” for “years and years”. That would be a real shame.

  35. Randy: “when all was said and done, there was 30 pounds less marijuana in southern Maryland than there would have been otherwise.”

    There is no good evidence for this, is there? Surely it is just as likely that there are 30 more pounds of marijuana for corrupt cops to use or sell through their own channels.

  36. J sub D, my alter ego…
    Nicely articulated.

  37. “Sorry if this guy or any of his colleagues ever find themselves in a situation where the innocent property owner whose home they raid is “armed” and happens to instinctively “paint the wall with their fucking brains” when they come busting the door down leaving their wives and children in “agonizing sorrow” for “years and years”. That would be a real shame.”

    I guarantee you that innocent property owner would be executed by the state for the crime of defending his property. Disgusting.

  38. NRO supports the war on terror. A lot people here don’t like that. That is their right. NRO was all over the Republican Congress on spending and continued to be all over Congress on spending after the Democrats took over, unlike Reason who forgot Congress existed after the Dems took over. They are also, as evidenced here at least supportive of small government on the drug war even though most of them are not for an end to prohibition. They are honest conservatives. They are just not Libertarians.

  39. “Would you rather have them be comfortable for those two hours, and risk officers’ lives and safety?”

    Short answer: Yes

    Long answer: Hell, yes.

  40. What an asshole.

    Bust into a guy’s house, shoot his dogs, no wrong doing there. But second guess a cop, whoa buddy you’re WAY OUTTA LINE!!!!!!

  41. The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled, public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance.

    Cicero – 55 BC

    1. Urban legend. Cicero only complained about arrogance and foreign assistance. Cicero predates the Roman quasi-welfare system.

      1. Correction: There were some very limited forms of welfare (tesserae – food stamps), but far larger problem during Cicero’s time was the growth of private military power. Generals distributed the loot from their invasions to their soldiers, encouraging them to continue making war. Perhaps this has some relevance to the WoD.

  42. “when all was said and done, there was 30 pounds less marijuana in southern Maryland than there would have been otherwise.”

    Aw, well, shoot, I coulda…

  43. Police departments are the only organizations I know that aruges it’s wrong to think before you pull the trigger.

  44. “”””I guarantee you that innocent property owner would be executed by the state for the crime of defending his property. Disgusting.”””

    The crime would be killing the officer. The question before us is if there in a such thing as justifiable homocide when a cop is the target. No cop would ever say yes, no prosecutor would say yes, and later we’ll find out what the jury hearing the Fredericks case has to say.

  45. Municipal police departments do fight a war on the streets of this country daily

    Funny, I thought they were supposed to be enforcing the law, not fighting a war.

    Would you rather have them be comfortable for those two hours, and risk officers’ lives and safety?

    Exactly how an two people sitting on a couch with their hands cuffed under (competent) guard endanger anyone?

    I think this guy is admitting to us that he is such weak fool that he is threatened by two middle-aged (or older) people who are handcuffed.

    We have every sympathy for officers assigned to execute these warrants – they are doing their jobs, and God bless them for it

    They were just following orders, and God bless them for it.

    when all was said and done, there was 30 pounds less marijuana in southern Maryland than there would have been otherwise

    If that was their goal, they would have just intercepted the shipment in transit. This guy really has nothing but contempt for our intelligence.

    Contempt that I return in full measure.

  46. “The crime would be killing the officer. The question before us is if there in a such thing as justifiable homocide when a cop is the target. No cop would ever say yes, no prosecutor would say yes, and later we’ll find out what the jury hearing the Fredericks case has to say.”

    If someone bursts into my house with guns I wouldn’t immediately assume they were cops. Self-defense is justifiable homicide, regardless of what the courts say. The cops try to have it both ways in this country: when they get the wrong guy it was an “innocent mistake,” but when someone mistakes the police for armed assailants they are punished to the fullest extent of the law.

  47. no-knock warrants are issued to avoid the destruction of evidence such as drugs

    but not if it is to keep drugs out of sewers, as appears to have been the case here

    I wish to remind everyone the specifics of this case and point out that destruction of the drugs was even less likely given the quantity involved. To wit:

    after he brought in a 32-pound package of marijuana

    The police had previously intercepted and were tracking this package. They knew how much it weighed and what was in it. The stupidity, it hurts.

  48. I keep a loaded shotgun in my room, despite my wife’s objections. If someone burst into my house I would kill them and not think twice about it. I just hope I don’t end up being a martyr for the drug war. I used to think that that would never happen since I don’t live in a bad neighborhood. But after this happened to some upper middle class white mayor who lives in the next country over, I don’t feel so secure.

  49. Just a quibble, if one is investigating the Mayor, one generally has to be circumspect about notifying other local authorities lest the investigation gets leaked to the target.

    I would give you 100-1 odds they didn’t know this guy was mayor of anything. They weren’t being super-secret to try to make sure some local cop didn’t tip off their mayor – it’s the opposite: They were going through the motions and didn’t think they needed to tell anyone else what they were doing.

    The thing about this guy’s letter that irritates me is that its use of red herring arguments. No-knock raids were originally justified by the threat that evidence might be destroyed, and they’ve become common based on claims that they’re necessary for officer safety. But that’s not what they’re really about. What they’re really about is inflicting terror on the population.

    I’m totally serious. Police frustration that the war on drugs continues to fail leads to police escalations. They want to show a lot of force, terrorize people and humiliate them, maybe fire their weapons at a few dogs, maybe destroy some property by tearing it apart while “searching” it, etc. All this force and all this destruction is purposeful in a way that goes beyond solving any particular crime. And since this won’t bring them any closer to winning the war on drugs, wait a few years and we’ll see yet more escalations – maybe bulldozing property like the Israelis or something, who knows. I don’t know what the next escalation will be, but I’m sure it will be creative.

  50. People who invoke the word ‘war’ except in the context of an actual war should be summarily exiled to Siberia or some equally insalubrious place.

    You mean like Milwaukee? 🙂

    (I kid, mostly because I need to laugh a little to cool the white-hot rage this post has thrown me into.)

  51. The question before us is if there in a such thing as justifiable homocide when a cop is the target.

    Only if the cop is gay. Otherwise it’s just justifiable homicide. 😉

  52. I’m confused. The cops intercepted the drug package, then let it be delivered so they could bust the adressee for, what, recieving drugs? Possesion of drugs? Possesion of enough drugs that it means they intend to sell them?

    So, why don’t the cops just send the box of drugs themselves, to whatever address they want to raid? As soon as the person takes it in the house (wondering what it is), the cops bust in and kill everybody.

    They simply tell the judge that they have reason to believe that the occupant “will recieve a large drug shippment”.

  53. Corbett’s letter isn’t just wrong, it’s chilling.

    It’s a pretty good snapshot into how our “heroes in blue” actually think.

  54. Dello, that idea get’s me all excited.

    There’s gotta be a druglord/cop/hitman who can confiscate and sell drugs while offing whoever he wants with no-knock raids. That plan is rock-solid.

    Cops do make the best, most ruthless criminals.

  55. “””If someone bursts into my house with guns I wouldn’t immediately assume they were cops. Self-defense is justifiable homicide, regardless of what the courts say. “””

    Justifiable homicide is all about what the courts (jury) say. Otherwise you’re just another guy on death row claiming he’s innocent.

  56. Dello,

    The Atlanta Police Department tried something similiar. Instead of just sending the drugs, they just got someone to say that they had bought drugs in a random home, broke in and killed the woman who lived there. It is a lot easier just using an informant. That way you don’t have to risk your stash by sending it to some dirtbag civilian.

  57. John,

    The problem with informants is that they can turn on you. Drugs will always say exactly what the cops want them to. Plus, with the drugs, the cops can take action photos of the homeowner ACTUALLY RECIEVING THE DRUGS! God, what great courtroom drama.

  58. No-knock warrants should be illegal, full stop. People, police officers and “mere” civilians, can and do get killed in the execution of these things. It boggles the mind that someone thinks the preservation of a few pounds or ounces of marijuana or cocaine is worth the risk to human life involved in the forceful execution of a warrant.

  59. Plus, with the drugs, the cops can take action photos of the homeowner ACTUALLY RECIEVING THE DRUGS! God, what great courtroom drama.

    And these pricks would get to use one of their favorite tricks, turning mundane activities into evidence of wrongdoing. “He SIGNED for a package! Therefore, he clearly knew it was a drug shipment!”.

  60. “Justifiable homicide is all about what the courts (jury) say. Otherwise you’re just another guy on death row claiming he’s innocent.”

    Is/ought.

    I’m well aware of how the justice system works. I’m saying I don’t approve of it.

  61. The question before us is if there in a such thing as justifiable homocide when a cop is the target.

    Only if the cop is gay. Otherwise it’s just justifiable homicide. 😉

    Funny, that’s the way I feel about straight people.

  62. Gruffbear | October 27, 2008, 5:17pm | #

    The question before us is if there in a such thing as justifiable homocide when a cop is the target.

    Only if the cop is gay. Otherwise it’s just justifiable homicide. 😉

    Funny, that’s the way I feel about straight people.

    No, you silly bear that’s heterocide!

  63. Police departments are the only organizations I know that aruges it’s wrong to think before you ______ pull the trigger.

    Kewpie doll for filling in the blank correctly!

  64. As a former Marine well versed in house clearing, I strongly take issue with the practices set forth by Prince George SWAT. I do know that pure lack of proper training and total lack of real time experience. Another thing I will say is that when any form of law enforcement operates in this manner at some point (usually the most crucial point) they find themselves in very dire circumstances that were created by their own ineptness.

  65. Shit Radley, don’t respont to the stupid letter, get to work and expose some of the bogus informants this pig has used to convince a judge to approve his raids.

  66. I’m glad some people here are coming to see NR as an honorable conservative newspaper. And I myself support the “War on Terror,” though framing it as such is typical progressive claptrap. Though if it were called what it really is, it would be denounced by Reason readers as “xenophobic” or “Islamophic,” which it is, and rightly so.

  67. .. “no-knock raid” so the suspect doesn’t “flush the evidence” which in this case is 32 pounds of plant material ..

    .. I’ve got one of those old-style water-waster toilets that I only have to flush one time for a typical, er, flush .. ain’t no way, no how, that I’m getting more than, say, one pound per flush .. then the tank has to re-fill .. call it a minute per cycle ..

    .. so, yeah, I guess I could get all of the evidence into the sewer but only if it will take them a half-hour or so to break in my door ..

    .. Hobbit

  68. .. oh, and even if they did give me that half-hour to flush, it flushes into a septic tank .. so they could either a)kick in my door and shoot my dog or b)pump my septic tank for 100% of the evidence..

    .. my guess is that they’ll go for a)

    .. Hobbit

  69. Is there some sort of shortage on tar and feathers?

  70. Miscreants like Kent Corbett that carry badges and firearms makes us all less safe.

  71. “The job is hard and dangerous, and therefore not worth doing properly.”

    Brilliant. I hope no cop ever makes the mistake of cuffing your family members and slaughtering their pets in front of you, you might just… oh, you would understand, since it’s part of the dangerous and difficult war on drugs, right?

    I’ve never done drugs, I don’t need to… but I’ve seen enough of this crap pulled about some stupid weed to know it’s bullshit.

  72. I love the sound of jackboots in the morning.

  73. Two questions for the Detective:
    “Whom do you serve?” “And, whom do your protect?”

  74. http://www.milwaukee.gov/mytip

    This is the tip line for the Milwaukee PD. I suggest reporting this sorry excuse for a detective before some innocent citizen dies at his hands.

  75. Detective Corbett errs in that the Prince George’s Police DID NOT HAVE a “no-knock” warrant, and that such a warrant had actually been denied them in favor of a standard warrant. Police stormed the house in response to the terrified screams of the Mayor’s elderly mother-in-law as she saw masked gunmen approaching the house.

  76. So they might flush 30 pounds of pot down the toilet?

  77. I would welcome the police to do a no knock search of my house. As a proud gun owner, I really hope I hear them shouting police over their flash bangs, cause if I don’t, all hell will break lose.

  78. With many new announcement about the wizard of oz movies in the news, you might want to consider starting to obtain Wizard of Oz book series either as collectible or investment at RareOzBooks.com.

  79. Here you can choose more new products, enjoy more discounts, so you get favorite products while saving money.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.