Drug Policy

The Other Steroids Problem

|

As the sports world waits to see what names will surface in the Mitchell report, this story came out about a week ago:

…27 NYPD officers cropped up on the client lists of a Brooklyn pharmacy and three doctors linked to a pro sports steroid ring.

Only six of the cops were found to have bought steroids and tested positive for the substance.

"But there were enough names on the original list that the feeling was a message had to go out," a police source said. "Cops had to be put on notice that the department can't have this."

Two police chiefs also acknowledged they either bought a steroid-based cream or were treated by one of the suspect doctors.

It's by no means the first such report. ABC News did its own cops-and-steroids expose a couple of months ago. The AP ran a similar story in 2005, and Men's Health ran a feature in 2004. In fact, you can go all the way back to 1989, when 60 Minutes aired a package on several cops who blamed their own steroid use for a series of police brutality incidents. William Grigg notes that the FBI warned of pervasive steroid use in local police departments in 1991. In 1999, there were reports that Officer Justin Volpe's use of the drug may have contributed to the police station beating and sodomizing of Abner Louima.

Given that police officers carry guns, night sticks, and tasers, and that they have the power to use lethal force when necessary, one would think our politicians would be more concerned about illegal use of a drug known to contribute to fits of rage and violence among law enforcement than use by a bunch of baseball players. Of course, it's easier to score political points with the latter. It's also probably a pretty sweet power rush to make larger-than-life sports icons cower at the sound of your hearing gavel.

Advertisement

NEXT: Prohibitionists vs. Antiprohibitionists in Dallas

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. It’s OK if police do it because it’s not sports.

  2. I thought this was going to be about soldiers in Iraq.

  3. Maybe this explains all the small dog/old grandmother/brown people shootings: roid rage.

  4. But it really benefits the run and shoot offensive scheme.

  5. They’ll never go after roid-cops. I think Hollywood will be the next roid-hunt target. These actors go from zero to hero in a ridiculously short amount of time. Bale and Mcguier will be the next Bonds and Mcguier.

  6. They’ll never go after roid-cops.
    Boston tests cops for illegal drugs. I dunno how prevalent that is across the nation.

  7. Boston tests cops for illegal drugs.

    Not one mention of roids in that article.

  8. True story: I applied for a job on a major metropolitan police force some years ago. The background check is quite complex. Two police detectives explained the process to those of us who made it through the civil service exam. They get to the part about former or present drug use. Someone pipes up “Steroids are okay, aren’t they? Because I heard they’re legal.”

    “No, they’re definitely illegal,” the detectives say.

    “But I use them, and I wouldn’t if they were illegal,” someone else interjects.

    A debate erupts among the various cop applicants about the legality of steroids as the two detectives laugh themselves silly over all the voluntary 5th amendment waivers.

  9. Show me a congressman willing to take on the cops, and I’ll show you a leprechaun.

  10. Even the roid rage idea doesn’t seem to have consensus.

  11. Two police chiefs also acknowledged they either bought a steroid-based cream or were treated by one of the suspect doctors.

    Steroid-based cream? I used some of that myself a few years ago; it didn’t make me angry or make my muscles any bigger, but it DID clear up an annoying skin condition I had at the time.

    I thought you had to ingest the steroids to get the muscle effects anyway.

  12. Along with possible being on ‘roids, apparently some cops are also “losing” drug evidence.

    After Arrests, Drug Evidence Goes Missing
    As officials hunted for the evidence in that case, they made a startling discovery: The drugs seized in 42 other arrests made in Brooklyn that same day, Oct. 20, 2006, also had vanished without a trace.

    On the plus side, thats 43 drug cases that won’t be able to be prosecuted since the evidence is gone and was never analyzed

  13. Meathead cops?? Say it ain’t so!

  14. On the plus side, thats 43 drug cases that won’t be able to be prosecuted since the evidence is gone and was never analyzed

    Wow man, that’s some Goood Shit! Yeah, it was analyzed.

  15. But I thought most cops were “good” and would never let the few “bad apples” among their fellow officers get away with illegal drug use while they’re out busting people for… well, illegal drug use, right? /sarcasm

  16. Given that police officers carry guns, night sticks, and tasers, and that they have the power to use lethal force when necessary, one would think our politicians would be more concerned about illegal use of a drug known to contribute to fits of rage and violence among law enforcement than use by a bunch of baseball players.

    If Congress gets the baseball players mad, the cops will protect them. If they get the cops mad…

  17. Let me translate:

    In cop world;

    What is OK for me (Cops) is not OK for thee (everyone not Cops).

    /Sanctimonious bastards.

  18. The steroids and the badge are two sides of the small-penis-compensation coin.

  19. Steroids and cops, perfect together. Ever notice that the older (late 40’s-50 yr old) cops look like somewhat out of shape middle age guys while the newbies have morphed into extra large shaven headed storm troopers? So it’s not just a few hours a week at the gym…
    ‘roids, badges, tasers and glocks, ’nuff said.

  20. Steroid cream is usually cortisone based and you wont get stronger with that

    One would usually inject (test, deca etc) but some come in pill form (dianabol, anavar) 🙂

    BTW google Ronnie Coleman, he was a police officer and 8 time Mr Olympia 😉

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.