Romney Vows to Fight Marijuana Legalization 'Tooth and Nail'—Unlike His Opponent?

This clip of Mitt Romney talking about marijuana at an appearance in New Hampshire is about a month and a half old, but I don't think anyone has noted it here yet. It is interesting for the way it reflects the basic difference between Romney and Barack Obama when it comes to drug policy, which is a matter of style rather than substance. Asked about legalizing marijuana for medical use, Romney gives the standard prohibitionist response:

I would not legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes, and the reasons are straightforward: As I talk to people in my state and at the federal government level about marijuana and its role in society, they are convinced that the entry way into a drug culture for our young people is marijuana. Marijuana is the starter drug....The idea of medical marijuana is designed to get marijuana out in the public marketplace and ultimately lead to the legalization of marijuana overall. And in my view, that's the wrong way to go. I know that other people have differing views. If you'd like to get someone who is in favor of marijuana, I know there are some on the Democratic side of the aisle who will be happy to get in your campaign. But I'm opposed to it, and if you elect me president, you're not going to see legalized marijuana. I'm going to fight it tooth and nail.

In short, medical marijuana is bad because it leads to recreational marijuana, which is bad because it leads to crack and heroin. Romney's reply got applause, so he apparently knows his audience, although recent polls indicate the general public is more likely than not to support marijuana legalization. Romney's reference to Democrats reinforces the notion that Team Blue is more tolerant than Team Red when it comes to people's drug choices. While it's true that the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act has more Democratic than Republican co-sponsors (18 vs. two), the numbers are tiny on both sides of the aisle, nothing like what you might expect based on the popularity of this policy change. More to the point, President Obama, the guy Romney is running against, is every bit as opposed to marijuana legalization, as he emphasizes when he isn't laughing at the very notion. Furthermore, contrary to his campaign promises, he has presided over a crackdown on medical marijuana more aggressive than his Republican predecessor's. The difference is that Romney is candid about his anti-cannabis absolutism, while Obama pretends to be more enlightened and compassionate.

 

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  • CampingInYourPark||

    Yeah, Romney will say anything to get elected. Watch him do exactly the opposite and try to legalize marijuana if he wins the race.

  • Zeb||

    I'm not going to hold my breath.

  • Calvin Coolidge||

    I'm holding my breath, but it's OK because I didn't inhale.

  • The Immaculate Trouser||

    The second there are votes in legalization, Romney will be sporting dreadlocks, playing Bob Marley songs at campaigns spots, and wearing a "Legalize It!" shirt.

    Problem is, potheads don't vote -- and very few people vote based on what doesn't affect them. The public sentiment for legalization is there. The votes? Not so much.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    "Problem is, potheads don't vote -- and very few people vote based on what doesn't affect them."

    Potheads aren't people...gotcha

  • The Immaculate Trouser||

    Uh... wut?

  • The Hammer||

    Hey, I do too vote!

  • Almanian's Evil Twin||

    Singing Peter Tosh songs to go with the shirt would be even more appropriate, but I guess I don't expect Romney to know that.

  • The Immaculate Trouser||

    I respect stoners too much to lump them all in with Tosh.

  • The Immaculate Trouser||

    Besides, Tosh ain't mainstream and broad enough for Romney.

  • Zeb||

    I'll take Tosh over Marley any day.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    Ditto. And Yellowman, Pato Banton, Gregory Isaacs, Aswad, Black Uhuru, and about a million others. Especially after they've gone through the dub blender of Mad Professor.

  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    Whatcha got ain't nothin new. This country's hard on people, you can't stop what's coming, it ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity.

    I keep telling myself that.

  • JW||

    Romney Vows to Fight Marijuana Legalization 'Tooth and Nail'—Unlike His Opponent?

    Well, duh. Those goddamned pinko hippies are nothing but stoned savages.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Yay. Republicans are soooo much better.

  • Paleo-ConAvenger||

    did you watch any of the tirades last night..?

  • BakedPenguin||

    Why? To prove to myself what I already know - that both TEAMs are scum?

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Actually, in this case it is better.

    Not the policy, but the honesty. At the very least, Romney isn't blowing smoke up the public's ass about being more sympathetic blah blah blah, then turning around and being downright fucking evil. We already know he's going to be evil, and as bad as that is, it's better than being evil and a liar.

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    Romney is an evil buzz-killer who will put people in cages because of a plant that grows in the dire, while Obama is a rational, science-oriented, evidence-based, compassionate, nuanced person who will put people in cages because of a plant that grows in the dirt.

    Can't you see the difference?

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    It's the evil boyars around Obama - they surround him so he can't hear the pleas of the people. But once he's re-elected, he'll get rid of the boyars and listen to the grievances of the masses, and everything will be fine.

  • John||

    If only the great leader knew of the sufferings of his people.

  • Brandybuck||

    Our Great Leader wouldn't recognize suffering if it snuck up and bit him on the ass!

  • Cavpitalist||

    Can't you see the difference?

    One is concerned with dire-planting, one with dirt-planting. Do I win anything?

  • Ayn Random Variation||

    Studies say that 99.7% of all crack users drank milk prior to their introduction to crack.

  • Doctor Whom||

    What's worse, an even higher percentage have detectable levels of dihydrogen monoxide in their blood.

  • Calvin Coolidge||

    When will we wise up to the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide and finally ban it!? I'm tired of Obama carrying the water for the DiMo lobby on this issue!

  • Mensan||

    ...carrying the water for the DiMo lobby ...

    What you did there, I see it.

  • BakedPenguin||

    If someone were to point out (to either campaign) that Di Mo is very often used to facilitate heroin injection, they could probably start getting traction for a ban.

  • John||

    Marijuana might be the entry drug to other drugs because, I don't know, it is illegal? About 60% of the country and 90% of our political elites are just full retard on this issue. It is sickening.

    Romney might be the only member of our political class who has actually followed the drug laws his entire life. I am not sure if that is better or worse. The rest of them smoked pot and snorted coke clear their 20s. And now have no problem sticking everyone else in jail for doing it, provided that doesn't happen to their little snowflake.

  • Calvin Coolidge||

    Absolutely. Gateway arguments only makes sense if you are arguing that using illegal marijuana teaches you what liars the enforcers are, and makes you less likely to believe them when they tell you. "Ok, you didn't run out and kill your family while high. But - don't you even think of trying cocaine! That will REALLY make you into a crazed killer!"

    Of course, the death toll for pot continues to grow exponentially. Multiply the deaths in 2009 by 10,000 and you get the death toll for 2010, and the same goes for 2011. At least there are no legal, socially encouraged drugs out there that ruin lives and lead directly to tens of thousands of deaths per year. I'll drink to that!

  • John||

    And by pretending that marijuana is dangerous, they help make it a gateway drug. Kids try it, realize they have been lied to about it, and then figure they have been lied to about every other drug.

  • sarcasmic||

    Once a person learns that drug laws are based upon lies, their respect for the law in general becomes questionable.

    Or, to quote Bastiat:
    "No society can exist unless the laws are respected to a certain degree. The safest way to make laws respected is to make them respectable. When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law. These two evils are of equal consequence, and it would be difficult for a person to choose between them."

  • Skyhawk||

    F'ing brilliant quote.

    Going to put him on my reading list.

  • Coeus||

    and then figure they have been lied to about every other drug.

    They have been.

  • Fatty Bolger||

    Absolutely. That's why I don't lie to my kids about the relative effects and dangers of various drugs. When I say a certain drug is dangerous and should be avoided, I want them to BELIEVE me. Lie about marijuana (or other drugs) and your credibility will be shot when they learn better.

  • Reformed Republican||

    Marijuana has been known to lead to death by SWAT. It can be very dangerous.

  • John||

    It is especially deadly for dogs.

  • Fatty Bolger||

    Trust me, I've also told them that by far the most dangerous thing about marijuana is the risk from law enforcement.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    "I've also told them that by far the most dangerous thing about marijuana is the risk from law enforcement."

    Becoming complacent enough to not worry about waking up for a job would be one of my warnings. Maybe this doesn't happen to everyone but to deny this occurs with some people is almost as stupid as believing thinking it causes insanity.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    nix "thinking"

  • sarcasmic||

    Becoming complacent enough to not worry about waking up for a job would be one of my warnings.

    Just as crazy people do crazy things on bath salts, lazy people are lazy when they're stoned.

    I've smoked the good herb on and off since I was in my teens, and I've never been unemployed for more than a week.

  • ||

    and i don't know what jurisdiction you live in ,but if it's like mine

    IF you got caught possessing

    AND if the cop bothered to even make a case

    AND if the prosecutor bothered to file

    unless you have some kind substantial criminal history, you probably have to fear a $50-100 fine and maybe 6 month probation. and once you complete probation a "continue without finding" which means conviction wiped from your official record.

  • sarcasmic||

    you probably have to fear a $50-100 fine and maybe 6 month probation

    Don't forget the substance abuse evaluation and mandatory treatment.

    That often costs more than the fines and fees.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    "I've smoked the good herb on and off since I was in my teens, and I've never been unemployed for more than a week."

    Congratulations. That the effects on your mood wasn't detrimental to your ability to stay motivated doesn't mean it's not to some people.

  • Jesus H. Christ||

    Fighting a losing battle here on that topic. Just because weed should be legalized does not mean it's harmless for all people. I agree with you about the motivational effects pot may have on some, but you'll get nothing but vehement denial from most others.

  • ||

    and as i have said, in most jurisdictions (certainly my own) your risk from law enforcement for mere possession is tiny

    IF the cop even bothers to MAKE a case (and not issue a warning for MJ, which happens all the time), seattle muni court and most muni courts around here IF the prosecutor even files (which again is not a given) are likely to impose such gross penalties as $100 fine and 6 months probation

    yes, that's a typical sentence around here. and that was NOT a first time offender

    everybody and their grandmother (literally) smokes mj and unless they are walking around in public smoking it, they have exceptionally little to fear from law enforcement

    growing or dealing are another matter entirely

    cocaine, meth etc users ARE worried about CJ system penalties (and should be) although even for those, it's expedited MISDEMEANOR filing (even though ti's technically a felony) and probation for first time offenders around here, but realistically MJ users have very little to fear in most jurisdictions

    they have more to fear from their jobs in many cases, as some employers - that would be a fireable offense

    heck, now that we have medical mj, even if your neighbors smell MJ smoke coming from your house/apartment, and the cops are called, it is not evidence of CONTRABAND, since there is no way of telling if the MJ is medical or not.

    they smell the same

  • ||

    The point was that the risk from law enforcement is greater than the risk of having ill effects of using the drug itself. So, if the risk of being SWATted is tiny, the risk of OD'ing ad winding up in ICU re even tinier. Get it?

  • naql||

    Yeah, well the only currently ethical way to use mj is to grow your own lest you be forced into the seamy criminal underworld to obtain it.

  • Zeb||

    It seems to happen to plenty of people without any assistance from drugs. I know an awful lot of dedicated stoners who work very hard and would never show up late just because they didn't feel like getting up.

  • naql||

    Well, the XBox would be a culprit there too.

  • Mensan||

    The only drug that ever came close to turning me into a crazed killer was Chantix®.

    Known side effects:

    thoughts about suicide or dying, or attempts to commit suicide
    new or worse depression, anxiety, or panic attacks
    feeling very agitated or restless
    acting aggressive, being angry, or violent
    acting on dangerous impulses
    an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania)
    abnormal thoughts or sensations
    seeing or hearing things that are not there (hallucinations)
    feeling people are against you (paranoia)
    feeling confused
    other unusual changes in behavior or mood
  • sarcasmic||

    Don't forget flatulence. Holy shit when I used that stuff I was driving around with the windows down in a Maine winter!
    Holy fuck that was putrid!
    But I did quit smoking. Going on three and a half years.

  • Mensan||

    I didn't get the flatulence. I just got the vivid dreams and daydreams (hallucinations) about murdering and dismembering my loved ones, increased aggression, insomnia, and heartburn.

  • Ken Shultz||

    I despise Obama so much for his economic polices. I'm having a really hard time tryin' to care about other issues.

    As I talk to people in my state and at the federal government level about marijuana and its role in society, they are convinced that the entry way into a drug culture for our young people is marijuana. Marijuana is the starter drug....

    That is so 1983.

    The idea of medical marijuana is designed to get marijuana out in the public marketplace and ultimately lead to the legalization of marijuana overall.

    That's why he's against it. That's exactly why I support it.

    So, now that that's out of the way, how likely is Romney to nationalize two-thirds of the American auto industry?

  • John||

    I would like to believe he is pissing in the wind and that it is only a matter of time before marijuana is legalized. But then I realize these people will never quit or admit they are wrong.

  • Fatty Bolger||

    So Romney says Obamacare is bad because it was done at the federal level, as opposed to Romneycare.

    I'd love to hear him explain why that doesn't apply to medical marijuana.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    See appropriate states rights quote below.

  • Skyhawk||

    Or see the 20% increase in my premiums, the $64 million annual shortfall in the program, and the increase of the Mass. income tax, sales tax, sin taxes, and 9 other taxes to pay for it...not to mention the large increase in waiting time to get a doctor's appointment.

    It's bad, simply because it's bad.

  • Fatty Bolger||

    That kind of brings up something that's been bugging me. I'm OK with all these articles about ways that Obama and Romney are the same. How about some highlighting areas where they are different? Romney advocated for letting bankruptcy court sort out GM, so there's one.

  • John||

    That is not how Reason rolls Fatty. There are two types of reason stories on the election; stories that tell you how the Republicans are bad and stories that tell you how the Democrats are bad but the Republicans are just as bad or worse.

  • Mensan||

    That's not entirely true. There was an article a few days ago about how the Democrats are bad and the Republicans are marginally less bad.

  • Proprietist||

    Different writers have different views. Reason is not particularly a monolith. They employed Weigel for crying out loud.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    "How about some highlighting areas where they are different?"

    Where they are different one of them is lying. Don't fuck up the narrative

  • Ken Shultz||

    How about some highlighting areas where they are different? Romney advocated for letting bankruptcy court sort out GM, so there's one.

    Romney scored an average return on investment of over 50% annually for his investors while he was at Bain.

    Obama squandered billions out of our paychecks on things like keeping the UAW overpaid and Solyndra.

    ...so there's another.

  • Coeus||

    Romney scored an average return on investment of over 50% annually for his investors while he was at Bain.

    What the fuck does that have to do with what he'd do as a Builderburger butt-boy?

  • ||

    Because reason's job isn't to do campaign promotions for candidates. If a candidate has pro-liberty credentials, they are highlighted. If they are anti-liberty, they are denounced.

  • Reformed Republican||

    Anyone who thinks Obama will legalize marijuana has to be high.

  • John||

    That is just it. If Obama had done anything but exactly what McCain or Romney would do on this issue, it might matter that Romney is full retard on it. Romney may fuck you, but at least he doesn't pretend he will respect you in the morning.

  • Randian||

    On social issues, true.

    On economics, OTOH...

  • Ken Shultz||

    That is just it. If Obama had done anything but exactly what McCain or Romney would do on this issue, it might matter that Romney is full retard on it. Romney may fuck you, but at least he doesn't pretend he will respect you in the morning.

    I have little doubt but that Obama is better on the Drug War--even if that only means he's more open to the possibility of legalization.

    Romney is so superior to Obama in regards to capitalism--Obama is as hostile to capitalism as Romney is to marijuana.

    I'd rather fight Romney on marijuana than Obama on capitalism. Being hostile to capitalism is just the end of the conversation for me.

  • Skyhawk||

    "I have little doubt but that Obama is better on the Drug War-"

    Stating he would make raiding mj dispensaries a low priority, then turning around and increased the raids over and above what occurred under Bush, doesn't make him better in my book.

    1. He's a liar.
    2. He is in favor of locking people in cages for doing something he did well into his 20's.

    There is no rationalizing that.

    And FWIW, I've never even tried it.

  • Ken Shultz||

    I didn't say he was good.

    I said I think he's probably better than Romney.

    You see the difference, right?

  • Coeus||

    I don't see how you'd think that. Obama actually did what Romney said he'd do. Fight medical marijuana. And how can you tell when a team BERULED candidate is telling the truth? When what they say leads to increased government power and/or expenditures, they mean it.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    And how can you tell when a team BERULED candidate is telling the truth? When what they say leads to increased government power and/or expenditures, they mean it.

    I have a theory.

    Whatever a politician says a bill is designed to do is just the selling point to his/her constituency. What one should look for in every piece of proposed legislation is "how does this bill expand the scope and size of government?" and that is the ACTUAL intention of the bill.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Anyone who thinks Obama will legalize marijuana has to be high.

    Obama would bring back slavery if he thought it would get him reelected.

  • T||

    As I talk to people in my state and at the federal government level about marijuana and its role in society, they are convinced that the entry way into a drug culture for our young people is marijuana.

    I give a shit what idiots tell a guy who can't drink tea for religious reasons. There's just buckets of stupid to go around here.

  • Jack the Reaper||

    *breathes in*

    FUUUUUUUUUUUUCK YOOOOUUUUUUUUUUUUU!!!!

  • sarcasmic||

    [insert rage comic here]

  • The Late P Brooks||

    [insert expostulation of stunned disbelief]

  • sarcasmic||

    Marijuana is the starter drug....

    Yep. It's the gateway to the black market, just as alcohol was during Prohibition.

  • ||

    what's ironic is that during prohibition (and note prohibition did NOT criminalize the POSSESSION or use of alcohol), opium use was quite common INCLUDING amongst alcohol prohibitionists.

    they viewed alcohol as evil, but opium was perfectly acceptable for the (mostly female) temperance movement leaders

  • sarcasmic||

    Opium had been illegal at the federal level for more than a decade before the beginning of Prohibition.

  • ||

    you are referring to the harrison act.

    that was a TAX act.

    it did not criminalize mere possession

    a very common misconception and i was waiting for somebody to make the claim you made

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H.....cs_Tax_Act

    there was NO federal law during prohibition that criminalized the possession of opium

    hth

  • sarcasmic||

    Did I say anything about possession? No.

    Thank you for moving the goal posts.

  • Coeus||

    they viewed alcohol as evil, but opium was perfectly acceptable for the (mostly female) temperance movement leaders

    I wouldn't be surprised in the slightest if prescription opiate and anti-anxiety medication was an order of magnitude higher among those MADD bitches than the general population.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    I know that other people have differing views.

    We will find them. We will hunt them down, and put them in prison for a very long time.

  • John||

    And shooting their dogs.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Incidentally, Obama eats dogs.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    "This clip of Mitt Romney talking about marijuana at an appearance in New Hampshire is about a month and a half old"

    This video dates back to at least October, 2007. Maybe those were the MTV days.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvfF3rqgKW8

  • CampingInYourPark||

    Yeah, Oct, 29, 2007. About a month and a half old. What are you smoking?

  • Fatty Bolger||

    Damn it, he might have switched positions half a dozen times since then! Get it right, Reason!

  • CampingInYourPark||

    Breaking news is a subjective term

  • The Hammer||

    Frankly, I'm just surprised that he clearly and unequivocally articulated a policy position.

  • ||

    i prefer romney over obama.

    one is honest and totally fucked up. the other is dishonest and totally fucked up.

    what really matter is this. when (because it WILL happen), a state(s) LEGALIZE mj, what exactly would romney DO?

    it's going to happen. if not this election cycle, then soon.

    when it happens, it will almost certainly be by citizen initiative.

  • CampingInYourPark||

    "'I’m not running on marriage and marijuana,' Romney said after the interview was over. 'Those are state issues, right?'"

    http://news.nuggetry.com/medic.....interview/

  • sarcasmic||

    I don't think it will happen.

    Drug laws give people in your profession an excuse to treat someone as guilty until they prove their innocence by submitting to a search.

    I know you claim to not be like the others, but in my experience cops love drug laws for the power it gives them.

    See some guy who looks like a creep, run him for warrants and check him for drugs. There's a chance you could take him off the street.

    No, I don't see drug laws changing any time soon.

  • ||

    sarcasm, i realize you try to use every post with me as an excuse to trot our your tired, false, rubbish

    spare me

    i don't what you see

    de facto, the situation has changed IMMENSELY for the better already vis a vis MJ (and i say de facto because i am including filing standards and practice as well as criminal codes)

    like i said, i literally wrote a case report "written warning" for a MJ possession a ways back and it got approved

    iow, OFFICIALLY we are allowed to issue a verbal warning for MJ possession

    UNofficially, that has been the case for some time. cops ROUTINELY dump MJ on the side of the road (or actually have the possessor do it) and wag their finger and that's it.

    i've seen cops do that, as a cop

    heck, i saw a cop do that when my buddy was caught in college. and he was even like all brown skinned and shit

    it's the reality

    nobody around here really has much fear of getting caught with a few buds.

    and again, drug laws already HAVE changed for the better. many states have decrim'd it, many have also legalized medical mj (which in my state means if you have a pulse and can say a few easy words to any # of local doctors you got your medical MJ script)

    that's reality.

    you can continue running arund screaming the sky is falling, but it isn't

  • sarcasmic||

    Round here the local cops have partnered with the DEA, and every Friday and Saturday night they hang around downtown doing their version of "Stop and Frisk".
    Nine of them. As people walk by the cops demand identification to check for warrants. If they don't find a warrant then they demand the person submit to a search. If they find anything the policy is zero tolerance.
    Then the next day in the newspaper there's a long list of names picked up for warrants and drug possession.
    I'm not making this up.
    Just because you do things one way in Washington doesn't mean that they do things differently around here.

  • sarcasmic||

    *doesn't mean they don't*

  • ||

    as i made clear, i was referring to my jurisdiction , and most jurisdictions.

    i am sure there are still SOME somewhere where cops and prosecutors take possession of a few buds seriously

    i suspect your characterization of what they do such as "demand identification" is rhetorical excess at best, or flat out false at worst.

    you know damn well cops cannot legally DEMAND identification for no reason nor can they DEMAND a search without cause.

    feel free to show me evidence they are doing such, hopefully it will be something beyond a claim by some arrestee that "they made me do it" when he's just trying to get out of a criminal charge.

  • sarcasmic||

    you know damn well cops cannot legally DEMAND identification for no reason nor can they DEMAND a search without cause.

    Know what happens when you say "No" to a cop? Yeah. You spend the night in jail on some trumped up charge that will be dropped the next day.
    The conversation goes something like this:
    "Hey there, mind if I ask you a few questions?"
    "Uh, kinda."
    "It won't take but a moment. Just wondering if you have any warrants out for your arrest."
    "Um, no. Can I go now?"
    "Just a sec. Can I see your ID?"
    "I told you I don't have any warrants."
    "Hey now, I just want to be sure."
    "Uh, no."
    "Do you want to go to jail?"
    "Not really."
    "Then show me your ID."
    "No."
    "This is your last chance."
    "I said no. I know my rights."
    "Rights? Ha! You're going to jail, buddy."

  • ||

    again, assertions w/o evidence

    and yet again, i am really starting to believe that you REALLY believe this shit

    your ability to selectively see what you want to see vis a vis cops is truly amazing and maybe it all does stem to that oh so terrible DUI arrest/conviction and you simply cannot view anything law enforcement related rationally, hopefully, or fairly

    cops are always lying (never get the benefit of the doubt), double standards are everywhere, and no amount of evidence will convince you otherwise.

    i get it

  • sarcasmic||

    feel free to show me evidence they are doing such

    I know better than to video the police, and better uses of my time.

    Have a great weekend, and try not to kill any dogs.

  • sarcasmic||

    Did I mention that they've got dogs as well?

    Yeah, they like drug laws. It helps them get the riffraff off the street.

  • ||

    i could not care less what they like. cops don't make law, and citizen initiative doesn't give a cop more or less of a vote than anybody else

    i am telling you this. mj will BE legalized by citizen initiative , in some state, within the next decade. i'd bet on it. if you want to make a bet, let me know.

    oh, also, just in case you missed the above - opium was NOT illegal to posses under federal law, during prohibition

    you are most likely referring to the harrison tax act, which did not criminalize possession of opium anymore than the volstead act prohibited possession of alcohol

  • sarcasmic||

    Oh, also, in case you missed it above - I didn't say anything about possession.

    Thank you for moving the goal posts though.

  • Hyperion||

    I'm going to agree with you on this one, at least one state will legalize, and probably sooner than later given the decade scenario.

    The other prediction I have already made, the Feds will go in and start busting down doors and busting heads. Then we will get the shit storm that we need to finally get politicians attention about this "non-issue.". Sooner the better. Putting people in prison for consuming a plant, and I want to add, one a lot less hazardous to society than alcohol, is barbaric.

  • ||

    yes.

    and MOLON FUCKING LABE!!!!

    i have confidence in my brother and sister officers that we will support what the people in WA pass, not what the federal govt. thinks vis a vis MJ

    oh, and I'll apologize to sarcasmic. you are right, sarcasmic. you did not say it was illegal at the federal level to POSSESS. you merely said "illegal at the federal level". that was in response to my saying that many temperance wimmins loved them some opium...

    but my bad. you did not mention possession and (unlike some people) i'm not going to say you implied. what i inferred is my bad, not yers

    cheers

  • ||

    and hyperion, i don't see how anybody can look at the trends, the public sentiment, etc. and not agree with us about this prediction. it's certainly FAR more likely. i just see sarcasmic as the classic ideologue cynic

    the ideologue cynic will always emphasize the negative (even if you post an article about some positive legal/con law/policy change), their response will be "yea but" and then a negative will be introduced

    similarly, like advocates in many issues, it's always about making the situation worse than it is (NORML does this all the time, as do the anti-mj warriors. same syndrome. different sides)

    feminists are the best at being ideologue cynics. if you listen to them, you'd think women were still being enslaved , barefoot, pregnant, forced to cook for the menfolk etc.

    i find cynicism to be boring and it simply sucks the soul out of you.

    homey don't play that.

  • Almanian's Evil Twin||

    Marijuana is the starter drug....

    Wow. I did not know that.

  • Rich||

    the entry way into a drug culture for our young people is marijuana.

    Incorrect. It's sugar.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Rock Roll leads to heavy petting.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Baboonspeak appears.

    Do not read.

  • Hyperion||

    In Maryland, they now require all dirty brown furiners to submit to a 3 hour drug and alcohol test before they can even take the written exam to get their MD drivers license. So apparently all dirty brown furiners are potential drug fiends and must be re-educated before driving on the concrete and asphalt pathways of death and destruction known as roads and highways.

    I know this because my wife just had to do it. And I knew beforehand that it was just her next lesson in Libertarianism - why the movement - 101. The look on her face as she came out of that room with her much valued certificate was priceless. The first question was 'why did they tell me that marijuana is the most dangerous drug of all? Why did they lie to me?' I just took her by the hand, bless her precious little heart and said 'As I already explained dear, it's called r-e-v-e-n-u-e, we will discuss more before your next lesson'.

  • Sigivald||

    Romney said: The idea of medical marijuana is designed to get marijuana out in the public marketplace and ultimately lead to the legalization of marijuana overall

    Now, I'm for legal marijuana (and indeed, all drugs).

    But he's right, in my experience, in that statement.

    "Medical Marijuana" is mostly (not entirely, but mostly) a front for plain legalization, and people barely try to hide it, in their talk, in their advertising of the "clubs" (here in Oregon, at least), etc.

    Nobody's fooled, and I kinda wish they'd just be honest about it.

  • Father Jack||

    Hey Mitt Ramenoodles, you worthless bastid...feck off! Drink! Arse! Girls!

  • Carl Milsted||

    The Republicans are trying to lose. Marijuana legalization is the most popular libertarian issue for the latest version of Quiz2D. Over half the takers call for outright legalization -- though most of those call for taxing pot like liquor.

    http://www.quiz2d.com/stats/Version7/all.php

    Maybe Stumblers are all stoners.

    Opinion on hard drugs is significantly less libertarian. Only 13% call for complete legalization without special restrictions (licenses, dilute forms only, limited jurisdictions like Vegas). Over 40% call for more enforcement for the hard drugs.

  • Kent||

    Good luck waiting for politicians to give you your rights back. You have to take them back. If you want marijuana, go ahead and grow it, sell it and smoke it and don't hide it. If enough people did so, they'd be so overwhelmed they'd be forced to give up. Make the entire country one huge pot rally.

    As Marc Emery used to say (before the Americans hauled his ass to a US Federal Prison) "Overgrow the Government".

  • naql||

    You first.

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