Coronavirus

Coronavirus Cuisine

In the face of the greatest challenge in generations, America's chefs, bartenders, and restaurant owners are reinventing their food, their businesses, and themselves.

|

This was not going to plan. On Monday, March 16, I was supposed to be in Austin, Texas, wrapping up a weeklong event at South by Southwest, where I would have been making Scandinavian craft cocktails alongside some of the top chefs in Denmark. Instead I was home in Portland, Oregon, essentially unemployed, alone on the patio of a brewery enjoying one last beer before my entire industry ground to a halt.

A few other lasts had occurred at the end of February, before I had any inkling of how drastically the "novel coronavirus" would disrupt the hospitality business. My last flight to New York City, which I happened to share with a friend who, upon landing, discovered his phone blowing up with congratulations for his bar's James Beard Award nomination. Our last extravagant celebration that night, with champagne and exquisite French food and gigantic bottles of rare Chartreuse someone had smuggled over in suitcases from Europe. My last venture into food tourism, taking the Staten Island Ferry out to find lunch in America's largest Sri Lankan neighborhood.

So many aspects of this ordinary trip seem impossible now: flying on planes, taking public transportation, casually running into friends, and, more than anything else, packing into restaurants and sharing dishes and drinks without the specter of a deadly disease hanging over us. By March 16, it was clear those things would be going away for a long time. The executive order shutting down businesses in the state was still a day away, but Oregonians were already staying home. I'd worked a couple of bartending shifts the week before—two of the slowest and lowest paid of my career.

Those last nights before the executive order I hesitantly visited a few of my favorite bars, torn between a desire to honor the virtues of social distancing and a desire to offer a last gesture of support to friends in my industry. I came up with ways to rationalize the visits: The places were mostly empty. The only people out were other service-sector folks. We all knew our time was up. I imagine it's what being at Lehman Brothers in 2008 must have felt like, if people at Lehman Brothers were covered in tattoos and worked for tips. "See you on the other side," we said as we parted ways, tapping elbows instead of hugging and having no idea what that would mean.

A few months into life under COVID-19, we're beginning to figure it out. The combination of state lockdowns and public fear of the virus has gutted the hospitality industry at all levels, taking down businesses of every size and stature. Serving a quality product and cultivating a loyal following is no guarantee of success in the present crisis. Through no fault of their own, many beloved places will shutter forever. But amid the grim news, some of the top bars and restaurants in the country are finding innovative ways to survive. They provide hopeful glimpses into the possible future of a drastically altered dining culture.

First, the Bad News

There's no sugarcoating it: The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated bars, restaurants, and other hospitality businesses, driving unprecedented levels of unemployment. The economic shock is difficult to fathom. Prior to the current crisis, the highest number of unemployment claims filed in one week in the United States was 695,000. In the last week of March, claims exceeded 6 million. By mid-May, more than 36 million Americans had filed, a grim statistic that still undercounts the damage. No industry was hit harder than leisure and hospitality, which shed at least 8 million jobs—nearly half the sector—in just two months.

In various states and cities, restaurants were forced by emergency shutdown orders to cease all on-premise service. Many business owners made the decision to shut down independently for the safety of their guests and employees. And politics aside, consumer demand fell drastically as awareness of the pandemic took hold.

Predictions for the year ahead in the restaurant business are dismal. A James Beard Foundation poll of 1,400 predominantly small and independent restaurants found that nearly 40 percent had closed at least temporarily and that only 20 percent of owners in jurisdictions that had shut down felt confident they could remain solvent. Industry observers predict that a quarter to half of bars and restaurants won't survive.

Government responses have focused on providing aid to workers. In March, the federal government passed a temporary boost to unemployment benefits. It also implemented the Paycheck Protection Program, a federal fund aimed at keeping workers on payroll.

Less has been done to ensure the viability of small businesses; slow response times and inadequate funding excluded many from the initial round of Paycheck Protection Program loans, which favored larger chains. And the relief that was available wouldn't be enough for the long term: Businesses were going to need to find ways to make it on their own.

From Haute Cuisine to Hamburgers

Aaron Barnett is the chef-owner of St. Jack, a French bistro in Portland, which in current conditions means he's also the chief dishwasher and prep cook. Prior to the official statewide shutdown, he made the difficult decision to lay off most of his staff and transition into takeout. Unfortunately, meals that work well in a dining room often don't translate to delivery.

"A lot of French food doesn't travel well," Barnett says. "You can't serve an emulsified sauce and expect it to be good after 25 minutes in a car." Instead, more casual menu items, such as the hamburger and frites or the fried chicken sandwich, are leading sales. "I don't know when St. Jack became a burger joint, but we're selling a lot of burgers now."

Barnett also looked into how restaurants serving other cuisines package their takeout so he could adapt the practices to his own cooking. Vietnamese pho, often delivered with the broth in a separate container for the customer to reheat at home, inspired Barnett's own takeout pot-au-feu, a French stew. "I made a porcini consommé that you can boil and pour over the top," he says. "It's tough coming up with fun dishes like that, but they work out really well."

Barnett isn't the only high-end chef unexpectedly flipping burgers these days. In mid-May, René Redzepi of Copenhagen's Noma—frequently named the best restaurant in the world and a pathbreaking leader in New Nordic cuisine—announced that Noma would temporarily reopen as an outdoor wine garden and burger bar. You see it, too, at Portland's Gado Gado, a Beard-nominated Indonesian-Chinese restaurant that has won national acclaim for its rijstaffel, an elaborate family-style feast of curries and sambals. Gado Gado has morphed into Oma's Takeaway, where diners pick up bags of "Asian stoner food" such as the "Omazing Burger," a burger accented with Asian touches like coconut-herb butter and a side salad of pickled papaya.

Some of these changes simply reflect the need to serve food that travels well for takeout or delivery, but even as restaurants gradually reopen to diners, they will face pressures that limit the potential for high cuisine. Restaurateur and Top Chef judge Tom Colicchio predicts a "dumbing down" of restaurants and a move toward comfort food. That can still be delicious, of course, but it will favor certain kinds of dishes—burgers, pizza, barbecue—over labor-intensive preparations that require a full dining room to be economically viable.

Beef Ribs of Instagram

Top-tier restaurant food isn't just about tasting good. It's also about looking good, both in person and on social media. Yet no matter how good they taste, meals in to-go boxes and plastic deli containers will never be as Instagrammable as the dishes at contemporary restaurants. Nonetheless, social media is proving essential to making takeout a viable option for restaurants that would have barely considered that market before.

"I can't imagine not having it," Jen Quist says of social media. Quist is co-owner of the Portland restaurant Bullard, which she opened in late 2018 with chef Doug Adams. With a downtown location in the lobby of a temporarily closed hotel, her neighborhood has become dead to foot traffic. Fortunately, Bullard's large-format Texas-inspired dishes sell out almost immediately when Quist posts them to the restaurant's Instagram account. That account directs customers to Tock, a reservation website for high-end restaurants that has pivoted from securing tables to securing food for pickup or delivery.

"We're doing 60 meals a day, five days a week," Quist says. Everything they serve is true to the style of the restaurant, with an emphasis on smoked meats, though they've had to be flexible due to the unpredictable availability of ingredients. "We've taken a pause on our beef rib because that's been hard to get," she explains. But when they can offer it? Even at $82 for dinner for two, their beef rib is snapped up within minutes. "What's really been amazing to us is the repeat business and the bond we've created with people who've supported us the whole way through. We see the same people a few times a week every single week."

Though the ubiquity of smartphones in restaurants was often lamented, the fact that so many potential customers now have internet-connected devices on them at all times is offering businesses ways to adapt that would not have existed in previous decades. Advertising dishes, queuing orders, taking payments, and arranging deliveries are all enabled by phones. And social media platforms allow restaurateurs to stay in touch with their clientele, if only virtually. "It's the only way to connect with people," says Quist. "We see how people interact with us because we interact back."

Rolling Back Prohibition

For some bars and restaurants, the lockdowns mean adopting an entirely new playbook. That's especially true for drinking establishments, many of which are now operating in a legal environment that would have been unimaginable as recently as the beginning of this year.

Three weeks before the lockdown in Washington state, bar manager Keith Waldbauer had just opened the doors at The Doctor's Office, a brand new cocktail lounge in Seattle. "We barely had a chance to establish our systems," he says. "We were just getting into our groove."

The Doctor's Office is an intimate 12-seat bar with obsessively curated classic cocktails, each one fine-tuned through a process that involved blind tasting hundreds of different combinations of ingredients. It's the last place one would expect to find a to-go option, in part because, until recently, such an option would have been illegal. But when Washington liquor regulators unexpectedly allowed bars to sell cocktails for takeout or delivery, Waldbauer adapted the "global tasting room" concept for the new model.

Those perfect cocktails—Vespers, Manhattans, Negronis—now come in 4-ounce glass bottles for the customer to drink at home, with the garnishes packaged in mini compostable to-go containers. The bar is also drawing on its extensive liquor selection to offer flights, featuring 1-ounce pours of rare spirits like Macurichos Tepeztate mezcal or Nikka Yoichi Japanese whisky. Eventually Keith wants to offer virtual spirits classes taught by his bartenders, getting them some hours of work and bringing part of the intimate bar experience home.

Yet state laws still prohibit some bars from making drinks for off-site consumption. On the West Coast, the freedom to sell cocktails to go is a striking divide. It's now allowed in Washington and California but still prohibited in Oregon. The option is high on the wish list of seemingly every Portland restaurateur with a spirits license. "I'm so jealous of my friends in Seattle who get to do that," says Bullard's Quist. Or as St. Jack's Barnett puts it, "I would fucking kill to be able to do it."

The cocktail revival that began in the aughts has turned bar programs, once an incidental part of a meal, into a vital part of the contemporary restaurant experience. That's especially true at Kachka, an acclaimed Russian restaurant in Portland owned by Bonnie and Israel Morales that's famous for its house-made vodka infusions. Their piquant horseradish vodka is a signature of the establishment—but one they're forbidden from sharing in a takeout format.

Before the closure, "we would make 18 gallons a week," Israel says. "If we were allowed to sell cocktails and infusions [during the lockdown], I probably would have to hire two more people just to keep up with it. The number of requests and people offering to bribe us to sell our horseradish vodka is amazing." But unless Oregon law changes, he'll have to keep turning potential customers away.

Changing Your Business Model, and Your Identity

Toward the end of 2019, Bonnie and Israel expanded Kachka by opening Lavka, an adjoining deli and eastern European grocery. In the COVID economy, that's turned out to be a better idea than they could have possibly imagined, positioning the restaurant to continue operating with much more than basic takeout. "I'm a restaurateur, not a grocer," Israel says. "So it's not even just changing your business model. It's changing your identity."

Lavka provides customers with hard-to-find deli products as well as mundane goods that became scarce due to disruptions to supply chains. "What's been really big for us? Toilet paper," Israel says with a laugh. He also buys 200-pound bags of flour and breaks them down into two-pound portions, feeding the nation's sourdough baking frenzy.

Through their website, the couple has started selling frozen bags of their popular Siberian pelmeni, flavorful dumplings filled with pork, beef, and onions, shipped anywhere in the United States. None of this replaces normal business, but it has allowed Kachka to keep 10 employees working. "It's the restaurant version of finding change under your couch cushions," Israel says.

At Lazy Bear in San Francisco's Mission District, chef-owner David Barzelay has also found grocery sales essential to success in the new environment. The Michelin-starred restaurant normally offers two sold-out seatings per night featuring a multi-course tasting menu at around $200 per person. Now it's doing "Camp Commissary," a menu of takeaway breakfast foods, sandwiches, and pantry items such as cultured butter, pickles, and take-and-bake cinnamon buns. Barzelay says the hot food acts almost as a loss leader: Guests come for a sandwich, but they leave with a bag full of provisions.

No Anchor, a beer-focused restaurant in Seattle, has similarly had to switch gears. When the state shut down, owner Chris Elford found himself with gallons of IPA and no way to sell it. Rather than let it go to waste, he saw an opportunity. "We already had a beer vinegar mother going," he says. "All of our vinegar has been made from run-off from our taps from day one." Those 35 gallons of IPA became the starting ingredient for No Anchor Provisions, the restaurant's new line of vinegars and vinegar-based hot sauces.

Like many other business owners, Elford expects provisions to be part of his strategy for the long term. Bars and restaurants may reopen soon, but in many cases it will be at half their pre-COVID capacity. Complementing food and drink for consumption on-site with packaged goods for consumption off-site is likely to become a more essential part of the bar and restaurant business than ever before.

The Limits of Coronavirus Cuisine

Even as states reopen, the pandemic will bring new challenges to the dining experience: Both employees and guests will need to stay farther apart. That means fewer tables in the dining room, fewer cooks in the kitchen, and fewer dollars per square foot. Hours of operation may be restricted during the initial phases of reopening, and in some places face-to-face bar service may be forbidden. A deep nationwide recession will cut into demand, and a massive decline in tourism will eliminate a source of consumers willing to make expensive nights out a memorable part of their travel experiences. All of that adds up to limit culinary ambitions.

Other limits are less obvious. Contemplating the future at St. Jack, Barnett envisions switching from paper menus to hand-written chalkboard easels. But that will entail shrinking the number of items available. And the restaurant's lengthy wine list? There's no way they could print a new one for each customer, especially not in waste-conscious Portland.

Another concern is that suppliers may not have as much to offer. Behind the scenes of the modern restaurant or bar is an intricate web of purveyors whose businesses are also facing extreme disruption. Some restaurateurs are trying to head this off by designing their takeaway menus to help ensure that the suppliers they most rely upon will still be in business when it's time to reopen. "By focusing on a few purveyors, we can make a big impact," Barzelay says. He cites Sonoma County Poultry's "Liberty Ducks" as an example. The fowl make their way into Lazy Bear's bahn mi sandwich as breast, confit, and liver pâté, as well as into take-home provisions including stock, duck fat, and whole cuts.

But as with so many workarounds, this approach can only help so much. The contemporary cocktail renaissance, for example, grew in a symbiotic relationship with specialty importers such as Eric Seed of Haus Alpenz. Seed's company helped revive the market for esoteric spirits like crème de violette, a French liqueur flavored with violet flowers, and Batavia arrack, a funky Indonesian rum. These and other once-forgotten bottles are now mainstays of the American cocktail scene.

Though Seed is still seeing growth for many products, he notes that the ongoing trade war has rendered the wine and spirits business particularly fragile. Tariffs are driving prices up at the same time that incomes are going down. After the Trump administration threatened in February to impose additional taxes, many importers and wholesalers began to stock up in anticipation, leaving them with less cash on hand when the virus hit. Seed worries that "the dual punch of tariffs and recession" will "harm all but the most durable of producers."

The New Normal

When you think of Texas barbecue, you probably don't think of Portland, Oregon. Odds are you don't expect to hear East Coast–sounding names like Matt Vicedomini, and you definitely don't expect to run into an Akkapong "Earl" Ninsom. Yet Vicedomini and Ninsom are partners in Eem, one of the hardest-to-snag tables in pre-COVID Portland, a current James Beard finalist for best new restaurant, and the place that even Texas Monthly declared in 2019 to be "simply the most exciting barbecue restaurant to open this year."

Eem isn't Texas barbecue in the traditional sense—it isn't traditional anything, really. The hit restaurant arose through the collision of two very different culinary lineages. Ninsom moved from Thailand to Los Angeles in 2000 to learn English and work in his cousin's Thai restaurant. He eventually settled in Portland, achieving success with expertly prepared Thai cuisine, ranging from upscale regional tasting menus at Langbaan to casual fried chicken at Hat Yai. Vicedomini, meanwhile, grew up in Long Island, began cooking barbecue with a Texas-trained pitmaster while living in Melbourne, Australia, and also ended up in Portland. There, he refined the art of smoked meats, building up a cult following at his rough-hewn Matt's BBQ cart.

The two married their talents at Eem, where barbecue brisket gets sliced for spicy jungle curry and chopped for wonderfully smoky fried rice. The combinations are unexpected and mind-blowingly delicious.

The creativity that makes Eem (and places like it) so much fun arrives via circuitous, unpredictable paths, combining traditions, techniques, ingredients, and approaches to hospitality in new ways. Often they fail; sometimes they make magic. That magic will be harder to come by in the post-COVID restaurant economy.

When we think of things going back to "normal," we really mean back to what we may eventually regard as a golden age of restaurant culture. The flourishing of the last decade or so was enabled by travel, immigration, international trade, intricately connected local suppliers, traditional food media, internet communities, and smartphones capable of taking professional quality photographs. Most of all, it was enabled by increasing prosperity and an openness to new experiences.

Prosperity and openness are both threatened now, the former by the economic crash and the latter by the fear that social gatherings will transmit an invisible and potentially deadly virus. The dream is that an effective vaccine will be developed in record time and we can hit a reset button on this year; the restaurant and bar economy, emerging from its deep sleep, will come back to life and pick up right where it left off.

The reality is likely to be far more difficult. Census data reveals that new business applications are already plummeting, and that likely portends a greater stagnation to come. Adam Ozimek, chief economist at Upwork, a global platform for freelance and remote workers, and an adviser for the Economic Innovation Group, a public policy organization advocating for economic dynamism, notes that a wave of business failures now would have effects for years. "When we're talking about a loss as high as 25 percent to 50 percent of restaurants and bars going under, that's going to do massive damage to the credit and capital of people in this industry," he says. Those are the same people who possess the local knowledge required to find new opportunities in their communities.

For Ozimek, it's personal. Although he's an economist by day, he's also a partner in Decades, a bowling alley, arcade, restaurant, and bar in his hometown of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. "Our one-year anniversary was the day before we closed," he says. They're currently offering takeout, including items such as an enormous 40-ounce soft pretzel, but it's not enough to sustain a business with that much real estate.

"When your restaurant fails and your debts go bad, entrepreneurial capital gets lost," Ozimek says. This means that not only would many existing restaurants go out of business but also that new firms would be slow to replace them. "We don't know what the fall, spring, and next summer are going to look like for the virus risk, so it would be a risky time to start a new venture," he says.

A wave of closures followed by the slow entrance of new firms is a worst-case scenario for hospitality, dashing the hopes of existing business owners while closing off opportunities for up-and-comers. The near future is likely to favor chain restaurants at the low end and culinary stars at the high end. Success will depend not just on quality and location but also on the technological and social savvy to stand out in a market where more people are staying home and discovering food via their phones. That creates additional barriers for potential new entrants hoping to make a modest beginning.

Still, for all the well-founded pessimism, the restaurant business appeals to people who find ways to adapt. Barzelay is undeterred from plans to open another restaurant later in 2020 and notes that his own career was born in the previous recession. He graduated from Georgetown Law School in 2008, began working as an attorney in San Francisco that September, and was laid off eight months later. He had taken up cooking as a serious hobby while in law school, and he debuted Lazy Bear as an underground restaurant at his apartment in September 2009. "I didn't start it as a test concept or even to make money," he says. "I started it because I had time." A decade later, he has a brick-and-mortar and two Michelin stars, plus an upscale cocktail lounge nearby.

The near-term outlook for restaurants is gloomy, with widespread unemployment and business closures all but certain. But this will gradually create opportunities. Commercial rents will drop. It will be easier to hire workers. Regulations swept aside in the emergency, such as bans on selling takeaway alcohol and restrictions on outdoor dining, could be permanently eased. Technologies from smartphones to delivery robots will continue to change the way we find, pay for, and receive our meals. The uncertainty of the pandemic, which may rise and fall in waves, will perhaps lead to a boom time for pop-ups: short-term ventures where out-of-work cooks and bartenders can try out new ideas, polishing them in preparation for when conditions become more secure.

Barnett is less pessimistic for the industry than some others, though he notes that things will have to change, such as moving tables outside, requiring servers to wear masks, and of course relying more on takeout hamburgers. "If you're stuck as a chef or an owner where you think you can just plug ahead doing what you've been doing, you're going to be sadly mistaken," he says.

As for what comes next, "I don't know if it will be a disappearance or a renaissance of fine dining," Barnett says. But whatever it is, "we'll find a way to make it as pretty and nice and charming as possible."

That's also the view of Kachka's Israel Morales, who notes that some reinvention will be healthy. "I think a really big mistake would be to assume that everything will go back to normal," he says. "This is the new normal. So embrace it."

Advertisement

NEXT: Oregon Doesn't Get Injunction Against Certain Federal Enforcement Procedures

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. ●US Dollar Rain Earns upto $550 to $750 per day by google fantastic job oppertunity provide for our community pepoles who,s already using facebook to earn money 85000$ every month and more through facebook and google new project to create money at home withen few hours.Everybody can get this job now and start earning online by just open this link and then go through instructions to get started……….COPY HERE====►► Click Here For Detail.

    1. ●▬▬▬▬PART TIME JOBS▬▬▬▬▬●

      I am making $165 an hour working from home. i was greatly surprised at the same time as my neighbour advised me she changed into averaging $ninety five however I see the way it works now. I experience masses freedom now that i’m my non-public boss. that is what I do……
      ↓↓↓↓COPY THIS SITE↓↓↓↓

      HERE► USA Dollars.com 

  2. Big corporations partner with local governments to roll over small business. It’s already happened in Chicago. Target has wiped out quaint, small shops. The suburban sized stores in the inner city take up entire blocks. After the lockdowns finally end sometime in 2023, there ain’t gonna be any small shops remaining. Only in America can communism be a multibillion dollar industry, just ask the CEOs
    who now mandatte workers participate in racial sensitivity training to appease Black Lesbian Female Mob Boss Mayor. The biggies can afford to pay the game of government taxes and virtue signaling mixed with palm greasing. My advise to this somber restauranteur, when you’re working as a waiter for Big Chain Cafe, remember to smile and nod when the leaders tell you that you have only Republicans to blame for your misfortune. So no one gets really hurt.

    1. ●US Dollar Rain Earns upto $550 to $750 per day by google fantastic job oppertunity provide for our community pepoles who,s already using facebook to earn money 85000$ every month and more through facebook and google new project to create money at home withen few hours.Everybody can get this job now and start earning online by just open this link and then go through instructions to get started……….Click For Full Detail.

    2. Or monopolistic forces are naturally present in a market. Not sure you’ve proven any connection between that and undue government patronage, let alone communism. It would take government to solve the problem regardless.

      1. No government patronage, as government closes all businesses except for the big multinational ones? I know you can do better than this.

        1. As a liberal I can assure you that undue influence by corporations on government is certainly on my radar. What do libertarians propose to do about it? Cut their taxes and regulations more? Call legalized bribery “free speech”?

          1. If the government had not the power to favor those corporations, there would be no interference:
            Shrink the government so it has no such power, you fucking ignoramus.

            1. I quit working at shoprite to work online and with a little effort I easily bring in around $45 to 85 per/h. Without a doubt, this is the easiest and most financially rewarding job I’ve ever had.GFr I actually started 6 months ago and this has totally changed my life.

              For more details…..► Home Profit System

          2. Making a book or a movie is free speech, which was the issue in Citizens United. Is that what you’re ranting about?

            Ready to go full on fascist anti-free speech? For the sake of democracy, no doubt.

            1. Tony is always ready to murder his political opponents, so a little fascism doesn’t bother him at all.

              1. I Make Money At H0me.Let’s start work offered by Google!!Yes,this is definitely the most financially rewarding Job I’ve had . YEr Last Monday I bought a great Lotus Elan after I been earning $9534 this-last/5 weeks and-a little over, $10k last month . . I started this four months/ago and immediately started to bring home minimum $97 per/hr

                Heres what I do…… SeeMore here

              2. Need I remind you that 80% of the people here are just fine with federal jackboots brutalizing protesters because they don’t like their politics?

        2. So which shutdown orders defined who had to close based on the size of the business? None. The orders defined business by what they sold, and since places like Walmart and Target basically sell everything they were able to stay open, but small businesses that sold the “allowed” goods were also able to stay open, like independent grocery stores (because groceries were an allowed item) and mom and pop hardware stores (because building materials were also allowed)

      2. “Or monopolistic forces are naturally present in a market.”

        Yes, and they are countered by competition
        Every.
        Time.

        1. You should tell businesses so they don’t waste time trying to corner the market to reduce or eliminate competition.

          I think the appeal of your worldview is that it can switch between self-justifying ideas with ease. One is that markets are magical, utilizing some unknown mechanism of nature to always produced the best outcomes. Since this is contrary to all evidence, you can simply switch to the idea that markets never do anything bad by definition because the moral good itself is defined by market outcomes. Complete this circle jerk of rhetorical cover for corporate interests by noting the rid anything obviously goes very wrong, there’s always a government to blame.

          1. “You should tell businesses so they don’t waste time trying to corner the market to reduce or eliminate competition.”

            So, there are no monopolies, but I should tell them that because of your half-witted assumptions?
            Followed by lies….

          2. The only good monopoly is the government, apparently.

            1. Nobody said monopoly is inherently bad. You want some monopolies. For the private sector you usually want competition so that it works as advertised.

              1. Turns out, private monopolies, of which there has been exactly one (Alcoa) which was not harmful.
                Every government monopoly turns out bad goods at outrageous prices.

    3. ” that you have only Republicans to blame for your misfortune. ” republicans or democrats, the coronavirus would have happen. Why are republicans to blame???

  3. “This is the new normal. So embrace it.”

    So sad that in the end this is a man-made panic and the advice is to just lay back and think of England instead of fighting this bullshit.

    1. If they aren’t fought they’ll just think up new bullshit.

      1. I quit working at shoprite and now I make $65-85 per/h. How? I’m working online! My work didn’t exactly make me happy so I decided to take a chance on something new… EWs after 4 years it was so hard to quit my day job but now I couldn’t be happier.

        Here’s what I do………..► Home Profit System

    2. What can you do? Pandemics may be man-made, but government abuse? Now, that’s a force of nature.

    3. The new normal is mass stupidity.

    4. Libertarian moment!

    5. It easy to see this as a man made panic but ignoring it did not work. If just fired up the virus. The world is in constant change and the new normal is every changing. I appreciate the people adapting and wish them well.

      1. “…If just fired up the virus…”

        You.
        Are.
        STILL.
        Full.
        Of.
        Shit.

  4. “This was not going to plan. On Monday, March 16, I was supposed to be in Austin, Texas, wrapping up a weeklong event at South by Southwest, where I would have been making Scandinavian craft cocktails alongside some of the top chefs in Denmark. Instead I was home in Portland, Oregon, essentially unemployed, alone on the patio of a brewery enjoying one last beer before my entire industry ground to a halt.”

    Could anyone sound more superficially precious? Or have a life more dedicated to useless extravagance? Grier makes the Kardashian clan sound like a bunch of essential workers.

    Among the many others things revealed during a crisis, perhaps the focus of life chosen by some people turns out to be rather frivolous. And whining is barely tolerable from 3 year olds.

    1. I’ll offer a contrarian view. I think this ability to do “frivolous” things speaks volumes about how robust our civilization has become. Quality of life is so good that a person can make a living by flying from Portland to Austin and demonstrate Scandinavian craft cocktails (whatever that is).

      As a resident of Austin I recognize your disdain and offer up my own ambivalence towards most of the nonsense that SxSW brings to our city.

      1. “I’ll offer a contrarian view. I think this ability to do “frivolous” things speaks volumes about how robust our civilization has become…”

        Make that two of us.
        Yes, we do need 23 brands of deodorant if only to wave them in the faces of supposedly ‘top men’ like that twit Bernie.

        1. Agreed.

          It’s not a life that sounds great to me. And I’d agree the author sounds a bit grating as well.

          But I’d prefer that the author can love the life he wants, and I can live the different life I want. It’s better than any alternative at least.

          1. “But I’d prefer that the author can love the life he wants, and I can live the different life I want.”

            All of this. Such luxury and abundance, that this guy can get people to pay him enough money to fly 1500 miles to entertain them. And there’s a sizable minority in this country that would prefer we were too weak to be able to afford that lifestyle.

            In other news, the deader at the Austin protest last night, Garrett Foster. was a Libertarian and public Jo supporter, in addition to being a vocal BLM advocate.

            Plus a penchant for open carrying an AK at Austin protests, and allegedly pointing said AK at a vehicle last night. The driver, who shot him, is cooperating with APD. Entirely likely he was familiar with Reason and perhaps, these pages.

            1. That came out strange. My guess is the protester was familiar with Reason; I’ve no idea who the driver that shot him was.

        2. Just as long as you worship the right messiah and use only the gender pronouns you approve of.

          1. Was that intended to suggest something other than an early bout with the bottle?

          2. It is Mask. All hail Mask. All hail It.

      2. I don’t think robust is the right word. Look how quickly things turned to shit after the writer’s experience in that city. Civilization is fragile and people take it for granted.

      3. Wealth is what enables these frivolities. Wealth is what enables freedom and innovation and progress.

        Luddites think that if they don’t want something, it is unnecessary, and if they want something, it is necessary.

        Imagine life reduced to the common essentials. Air, water, food.

        Oh you want shelter? OK, here’s a cave. Clothing? OK, kill that bear. Transportation? You got feet. Medical care? Find some herbs.

        Reminds me of all those precious idiots saying truckers and farmers were the most essential workers, but reality TV? Sportsball? Naw, nobody needs those. Those truckers and farmers might differ. Maybe after a long day of working essentially, they like to watch billionaires paying millionaires to bash each other, or rich ditzes reciting scripted dramas.

        1. I had a mexican bbq and margarita ‘social distancing’ hang out this weekend, with my neighbors.

          If you guys know of a better way to explain to an academic ’50’s-ish’ lady how her veganism is the height of first-world, *white* privilege, I’m all ears.

      4. Of course the degree we get to indulge our personal desires reveals something about how productive we all are (at least most of us). But “robust” is not what we have seen (or what Grier is whining about). Like much of our modern society and economy, it turns out that lots of things do not survive any degree of disruption. And that in truly hard times (natural or induced) extravagant things vanish quickly, and living lifestyles that used to be available to the uber-wealthy revert to, well, only the uber-wealthy.

  5. Oh, and the cutesy message about staying safe by staying home, given the data on infection transmission, that only works if you kill your family and room mates before they infect you.

    1. Make 6,000 dollar to 8,000 dollar A Month Online With No Prior Experience Or Skills Required. Be Your Own Boss AndChoose Your Own Work Hours.Thanks A lot Here>>>ReadMore.

    2. No jury would convict you.

  6. We WILL return to normal, complete normal, no masks, no distancing, nothing unusual. Why? Because we never needed to shutdown in the first place. If COVID-19 fatalities were counted using the same criteria as used for SARS, there’d be about 16,000 https://americanmind.org/essays/the-covid-coup/ .

    The wild over reaction by democrat governors and mayors was purely political.

    Watching the creation of The State Science Institute is one reason for my sig:

    Atlas Shrugged was supposed to be a warning, Not A Newspaper!

    1. Which politician ignored science and counsel of medical expertise in favor of an unnecessarily draconian lockdown that would ruin the economy? Which politician does that benefit?

      1. “Which politician ignored science and counsel of medical expertise in favor of an unnecessarily draconian lockdown that would ruin the economy? Which politician does that benefit?”

        Newsom, for one. Cuomo, for another.

      2. Phailing Phil Murphy. Governor of the People’s Republic of NJ.

        1. I’ll not debate that point. It could in theory be politically beneficial to see the entire country turn into just enough of a shithole to make New Jersey seem livable.

      3. Phil Murphy, Andrew Cuomo, Gretchen Whitmer, Tom Wolf, Bill DeBlasio…

      4. Politicians are just as infallible as markets.

        1. Markets have corrections.

  7. Every month start earning more cash from $20,000 to $24,000 by working very simple j0b 0nline from home. I have earned last month $23159 from this by just doing this 0nline w0rk for maximum 3 to 4 hrs a day using my laptop. This home j0b is just awesome and regular earning from this are much times better than other regular 9 to 5 desk j0b. Now every person on this earth can get this j0b and start making dollars 0nline just by follow instructions on the given web page>>>Click Here For Full Detail.

  8. I’ve been surprised at the number of hospitality businesses that have been able to keep their doors open. But still, it’s certain that they’ve also almost all taken revenue hits and shed jobs. And there is still so much fear out there. Last night we went to one of our favorites, a place that we never bother with on a Saturday night because there’s a line out the door. But last night, for the second weekend in a row, it was practically empty. They had full social distancing protocols, but still, the customers weren’t coming back.

    I still don’t understand why the stock market is where it is. I guess the employment shakeout hasn’t fully hit bottom lines. But I can’t see how there’s not some sort of massive market correction coming in the near future. And the economic bounce-back seems far far distant.

    1. It seems distant, but it is not.

      1. Right. At some point this ends, and that point can’t be far away given current trends. Things certainly won’t be like this in a year.

        And then what? The demand for all the good things will still be there, and so will the supply. That bowling alley and all its expensive real estate? It’s not like the real estate can disappear. Same with all the other factors of production.

        Anyone who timed this right (probably just lucky) and cashed out when they could still get a good price is going to be swimming in investment opportunities very soon. In a generation we’ll know about the class of richy-riches who got in at this mother of all bottoms.

        1. “And then what? The demand for all the good things will still be there, and so will the supply. That bowling alley and all its expensive real estate? It’s not like the real estate can disappear. Same with all the other factors of production.”

          Nope.
          A successful business is not just a plant, some raw materials and a collection of fungible people; they are the result of the right people, carefully selecting inputs and processing those to an output through carefully-developed processes.
          That bowling alley probably isn’t coming back as a bowling alley; *that* collection of people, input and process is GONE.

    2. Your looking at the stock market wrong. Many would like to portray the market to you as a measure of a good economy. What moves the stock market is confidence. Much of the market now understands that this pandemic is here for the foreseeable future and has corrected its expectations for that. The market doesn’t see the economy returning to prepandemic but rather has adjusted to a new normal.

  9. In the face of the greatest challengegovernment screw-up in generations, America’s chefs, bartenders, and restaurant owners are reinventing their food, their businesses, and themselves.

    FTFY

  10. Government made a mess of this. Sweden is gonna get the last laugh.

    And if I get a note ‘Stay safe, stay home’ on my bag I’m gonna throw it back in the face of chef.

    They shouldn’t be playing good citizen with empty slogans. They should be MAD. All of us should be outraged by the fact the government is in total control of how we live and move.

    It’s beyond astonishing we’ve let these incompetent, psychopath mid-wits do this.

    1. “…They shouldn’t be playing good citizen with empty slogans. They should be MAD. All of us should be outraged by the fact the government is in total control of how we live and move…”

      We have sacrificed control of our lives and most of our economic activity to that notably incompetent organization known collectively as ‘the government’, and anyone who has read even a modicum of 20th-century history should know full well that *nothing* good comes of that.
      And we have done so as a result of an illness which infects many and seems to cause real harm in few; so far, it has yet to kill 1/10 of 1/2 of 1% of our population.
      After more than 6 months of draconian controls, followed by a mild relaxation of these controls, we find a rise in the infection rate, accompanied by a falling death rate. The governments’ response is to increase controls, which controls, from experience, seem only to have pushed the rise in infection rates down the calendar.
      At one time we were told the controls would be withdrawn after ‘the curve was flattened’; now it seems they will be lifted after Eastasia is defeated.
      At least some of us are embarrassed at the lack of outrage at such a naked power grab, and I was not alone in calling for rioting in the streets the first day Newsom decided he was dictator thereby ruling when and under what conditions we could leave our prisons.
      Again, this grab was accepted by us as a result of an illness which infects many and seems to cause real harm in few; so far, it has yet to kill 1/10 of 1/2 of 1% of our population.
      The path forward and out of this government-inflicted disaster is suggested by Vaclev Havel’s approach (“Post War”, Judt, pg 568):
      “…The objective […] should be to act with autonomy, whatever the regime tries to impose on you; to live *as if* one were truly free…”
      Regardless of the CA ‘mask gestapo’, I wear a face diaper when I must enter a business and nowhere else; any dirty looks get a smile in return.
      No, I will not be tested, since it seems any test is valid for, oh, a week or so at best. Nor will I accede to any ‘tracking’ scheme, regardless of any claims of privacy.
      Simply I attempt to act as if the world is not currently in control of tin-pot-dictator wannabes; if it means a ticket or jail for action, I’m your guy!

      1. We have sacrificed control of our lives and most of our economic activity to that notably incompetent organization known collectively as ‘the government’

        Maybe you. I wouldn’t trust this government to run a fucking daycare let alone give them control of nuclear weapons. My ideological brethren are busy duking it out with federal troops in the Pacific Northwest. Where are you? At your local GOP block captain meeting? Pfft… that’s pathetic— especially where you live.

        1. “Maybe you. I wouldn’t trust this government to run a fucking daycare let alone give them control of nuclear weapons…”
          An yet, as a fucking lefty ignoramus, you ignore all historical evidence and hope the NEXT socialist government will somehow do it right!

          “…My ideological brethren are busy duking it out with federal troops in the Pacific Northwest…”
          You lefty out the part where they’re burning down buildings, which is no great surprise, you stinking piece of lefty shit.

        2. Oh, so you demanded totalitarian government but just not this brand?

          Fuck off.

        3. Oddly enough, they DO have control of nuclear weapons, but not much control over the economy. So I guess that sucks for you.

        4. “Block captain”? Gee, as a self-proclaimed socialist, you know all about those, don’t you?

    2. The refrain that bothers me the most is “we should be paying attention to science now. We shouldn’t be playing politics.”

      These consistently come from folks I know who demand pretty extensive government intervention, from a national Mask mandate to forced quarantines to whatever. I just want them to recognize that the insertion of government force is inherently political. And that they believe in some apolitical, purely scientific, government action is truly scary to me.

      1. Unless that science says clearly to open the schools?

        1. Far too many people believe what they want regardless of facts based on how they feel. There could be dozens of Nobel prize winning scientists saying the facts prove COVID-19 is not nearly as lethal as initially thought and that given the actual risks it’s time to lift most of the restrictions and get on with life. If 2 people with a BS and a Democrat leader say we need to keep the lockdown going, the scientists will be summarily dismissed and attacked for being greedy conservative hacks willing to let grandparents die for money.

    3. It’s the media we have allowed to do this. Even the biggest media critic on the planet, Donald Trump, fell for their fear tactics and will eventually go down as a result. They butchered the world’seconomy to go after the only anti-establishment president in100 years. He lost, they won, but they aren’t done. Who’s to blame? Screaming fire in a public place has not passed the SCOTUS scrutiny for free speech, but we have allowed the media to get away with it over and over. You can call it fake news, but that lessens the reality of its impact. It’s screaming fire nonstop all day, and the results of all these false flags have been devastating. But we humans need our entertainment, so on an on the media rips holes through our society, and we act like corporate communist monstrosities like Netflix is our safe place. And yes I watch it too. I need to escape through the very monster that is forcing me to need to escape. Choices? Even Fox News is woke now. Give me more of that heroin so that I can forget that it’s killing me.

      1. Of all the media except for a few unshowered fringe Youtubers are saying something is actually a crisis, maybe consider the possibility that it is.

        Say what you will about Trump, he never feels pressured to step away from whatever chic rightwing conspiracy theory is out there. You say he’s been compromised by some ill-defined conspiracy to destroy the economy. Or perhaps even he has the remaining brain functionally necessary to see a deadly global pandemic as something to be concerned about and worthy of trying to fix.

        1. “Don’t believe your lying eyes, believe what your betters tell you!”

          -Tony

          1. “I started with a 5th about 9 this morning”
            -Tony

          2. If all your eyes want to do is seek out fringe rightwing bloggers, yes, you should shut your face and listen to your betters.

            1. As if YOU could identify anyone’s ‘betters’.
              Fuck off and die.

              1. Luckily this society credentials people for their wisdom and expertise, so I don’t have to guess.

                1. “Luckily this society credentials people for their wisdom and expertise, so I don’t have to guess.”

                  Yeah, that’s the reason you start drinking in the morning.

                  1. I’m a nondrinker right now, sadly.

                    1. Did you pass out and keep typing?

                    2. “I’m a nondrinker right now, sadly.”
                      Yeah, we’ve all heard that story and seen the evidence (provided by you) that it’s bullshit.
                      Or, perhaps, you’re that fucking ignorant absent booze or other drugs.

                    3. Sad for who? Definitely not for the poor people that have to deal with you IRL.

      2. Sad but true. It’s difficult if next to impossible to maintain a functioning free society when a functioning free press is replaced by a massive corporatist propaganda complex that busies itself actively suppressing dissident voices, deplatforming contrarian opinion and marginalizing principled truth-seeking.

        Remember when Twitter called itself “the free speech wing of the free speech party”? How’d that end up working out? For that matter, remember when there were locally owned newspapers? The unfortunate reality is that there’s really no sustainable market demand for a free press in this country, or for free speech in general.

    4. Black Lives Matter

  11. The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated bars, restaurants, and other hospitality businesses, driving unprecedented levels of unemployment.

    We, the American dining consumer, wish to honor your sacrifice, as we toss you into the Rona volcano, and scream GRANDMA KILLER at those of you who dare complain on the way in.

  12. See there? It took 20 years for the effects of Y2K to kick in and 12 years for the Maya Calendar to doom us all.

  13. It was dismaying to learn that delivery services screw restaurants over and can be a cost to them rather than a source of profit. My sister runs a restaurant that refuses to be listed, and they were aggressive in opening as much and as early as they were allowed. Now their staff has three Covid cases.

    I was having a minor ethical crisis before the lockdown about this, since I would regularly use DoorDash and such. After the lockdown the ethical concerns could be laid aside since you couldn’t go in-person anyway. There is a real, if minor, tug against freedom since you just can’t get meals that are meant to be served straight out of the kitchen. Not to mention the actual enjoyment that comes with going out with people. But it’s a small price to pay for not dying. Would that this country had better leadership so all these things could come back sooner.

    1. If Hillary were president we’d be in the same boat or worse sinking faster. All of these decisions were made by governors and there’s not much success rate except in lower population density states.

      It’s time to speak honestly and forcefully to the Chinese communist government and make them pay for their lies distortions and blame shifting. They could have tried honesty but it’s not in their culture.

      Unfortunately the left is enamored of China’s one party rule and they are attempting it here. It will fail horribly.

      1. No one can say what would have happen had Hillary Clinton been President. We can say this, Hillary would not have started a disastrous trade war with China. She would not be in a position to have to placate the Chinese, like President Trump did, to try to get an agreement. With experience in diplomacy she would have been more likely to follow the lead of countries that were successfully addressing the pandemic. The pandemic would come no matter who was President, but Hillary would be likely yo handle it better.

        1. “No one can say what would have happen had Hillary Clinton been President.”
          OK, followed by:

          “We can say this,…”
          Worthless speculation.

        2. We can say this, Hillary would not have started a disastrous trade war with China.

          LOL! What a gal. When she’s bought she stays bought.

      2. “They could have tried honesty but it’s not in their culture.”

        Never miss an opportunity to be a racist dickhole. See, if the yellow Chinese are to blame for everything, Trump isn’t to blame for anything. It’s politikal genuous!

      3. Unfortunately the left is enamored of China’s one party rule…

        And fascism, focus on ideological conformance, sheep-like population, purging of dissidents, plush lifestyles for the ruling class, and on and on and on.

    2. It’s a small price?

      Three cases is nothing Tony. It’s statistically insignificant.

      And have you paid any attention? You talk as if Covid will kill you.

      Again, the statistical probability of that happening is small. Yet in that tiny improbability they managed to fool people like you – completely incapable of perspective and context – to believe this is a deadly virus – which it isn’t.

      Now go look at the trade-offs our spectacularly stupid response in the form of lockdowns and idiotic face masks. The lockdowns have ruined and cost lives by an order of magnitude twice over compared to Covid-19 could ever do. In a nutshell, in addition to destroying kids and their education as well as causing starvation and abuse, for every person spent saving (and to be frank since we’re ruled by incompetent psychopaths I don’t even think it’s about that anymore) it may have cost us 1.5 to 2 people – if not more.

      Is that the price you’re referring to?

      1. And the fall out of the masks will also start to appear.

        Already we have stories of cops beating people up and some cunt in California (where else?) macing a couple because we’re conditioning low IQ people to thick we’re a threat to each other.

        Leaders and people who egged this superstition on can go to hell. Literally.

        1. Yep. People talk about the masks as if they are cost-free, but turning Americans into Nazis is a pretty high cost if you ask me.

          All because “It might be better than nothing.”

          1. Are masks going to turn Americans into Nazis? Really?

            1. Who wants to field this one?

              1. If not Nazis, then Nazi theater. Now to be fair, Americans do themselves some theater. Think about what changes the public sees after 9-11. We have TSA security theater. And we have permanent war disguised as democracy delivery (and security) theater.

                So while Americans might not become real “let’s invade Canada and Mexico” and round up all the (insert your most hated group here) Nazis, the dress-up and marching will quickly get very annoying. Not to mention the worship of Dear Leader.

      2. “Three cases is nothing Tony. It’s statistically insignificant.”

        Read the comment. That three is just in a the restaurant’s staff, that is significant. It likely meant the whole place had to close down and quarantined all staff. So the restaurant does get in house, takeout, or delivered customers. It get nothing.

        1. I read that. I know it’s way out there but I’m at the point I think that too is overplayed. I’ve seen a number of those incidences where staff get infected in one place.

          Go home. Quarantine. Get better. Move on.

          Enough with the lockdown hoopla already.

      3. “Three cases is nothing Tony. It’s statistically insignificant.”

        What an insight into how your brain works. I’ll check in with you when there are 15 cases of this highly contagious disease and see if it’s “statistically significant” to the workplace in question then.

        Your comically autistic approach to this naturally misses the obvious point: people can and do choose all for themselves how exposed they want to be to this disease, based on the facts of it.

        Government mandates of course are one major source of direction and education on what’s appropriate. And government can be a terrible source of information and leadership such as when it ignores the facts, downplays the risk for political gain, and moves to reopen the economy when it would only mean a worse and longer outbreak.

        You can tell people that their risk is low according to your Excel spreadsheet, but oftentimes people will rationally choose to be cautious when something is highly likely to infect them, perhaps even if it wasn’t a game of Russian roulette with their life and health.

        Witnessing libertarians tell other people exactly how many of them should sacrifice themselves for the sake of a good economic quarter (*cough* Trump’s poll numbers) is amusing to no end. I always told you you were fascists.

        1. “…Government mandates of course are one major source of direction and education on what’s appropriate…”

          Assertions from lefty fucking ignoramuses =/= argument.

        2. You know if this disease is as contagious as you fear, that means the death rate is even lower than what’s being reported right?

          1. You know that hundreds of thousands of dead people is bad no matter what, right?

    3. “It was dismaying to learn that delivery services screw restaurants over and can be a cost to them rather than a source of profit.”

      Folks, shitstain actually posted that; let that sink in.
      I’ll bet it’s a surprise to this slimy piece of lefty shit that the *food goods* restaurants buy ‘can be a cost to them’!
      Tony’s stupid that way, along with many other ways.

      1. He does almost have a point: Often when I order doordash, I want to also tip the restaurant that’s actually cooking the food. As far as I can tell, there’s no way for that to happen.

        1. “He does almost have a point: Often when I order doordash, I want to also tip the restaurant that’s actually cooking the food. As far as I can tell, there’s no way for that to happen.”

          Well, no.
          That is not a result of the cost of delivery services. Try again.

        2. Buy drinks and dessert. They are all profit margin, as opposed to entrees

      2. I can’t tell if you’re a downer person or an upper person. Whatever it is, take less of it.

        I’m merely referring to the complaints of restaurants that delivery services structure their fees and such in a way that restaurants lose money on each transaction. They tolerated it pre-outbreak as a sort of advertising cost. Now that it’s their primary means of getting their product to people, I’m not sure if things actually got better or if they’re still losing money on deliveries through these services.

        Either way this wasn’t a criticism of Trump, so you can untwist your panties and go back his ripe, throbbing tit in that way that is equal parts innocent suckling babe and jealous man-slut.

        1. “I’m merely referring to the complaints of restaurants that delivery services structure their fees and such in a way that restaurants lose money on each transaction.”

          In which case, not being the fucking lefty ignoramus that you are, they would not use those services.

          1. Tony’s dumb enough to use a delivery service that loses him money. He’s also dumb enough that he’ll never be on a position to make this stupid decision. At least not for long

            1. I have no idea how Tony makes his/her living other than the claim, many years back, that s/he is ‘an editor’ living in a gated residence in fly-over country. Similarly, at about the same time, s/he claimed top have ‘an advanced degree’.
              Editor of ‘Dog Walker’s Weekly’ fills the bill all the way around.

  14. “There’s no sugarcoating it: The COVID-19 pandemic has devastated bars, restaurants, and other hospitality businesses, driving unprecedented levels of unemployment.”

    There’s no sugarcoating it: The GOVERNMENT RESPONSES to the COVID-19 outbreak has devastated bars, restaurants, and other hospitality businesses, driving unprecedented levels of unemployment.

    Please think for your self, and be SURE to vote in November.

    Welcome to the revolution.

    1. “There’s no sugarcoating it: The GOVERNMENT RESPONSES to the COVID-19 outbreak has devastated bars, restaurants, and other hospitality businesses, driving unprecedented levels of unemployment.”

      “But the debble made me do it!!!’
      Gavin Newsim.

      1. Nope. It was Science made him do it.

    2. Definitely vote against retaining the current government, yes.

      1. I would definitely vote for a mannequin over that grease-ball currently residing in Sacto.

        1. I would be proud of you if you managed to get your crayon mark somewhere within mashing distance of the ballot.

          1. “I would be proud of you if you managed to get your crayon mark somewhere within mashing distance of the ballot.”

            Need help finding your crayon after you’ve worked that bottle down a bit?
            Tough shit; I’m not going to help you, you pathetic piece of lefty shit.

          2. Somebody already told the crayon joke this weekend. Pathetic.

  15. See there? It took 20 years for the effects of Y2K to kick in and 12 years for the Maya Calendar to doom us all.

  16. JACOB GRIER, a freelance writer, bartender, and consultant based in Portland…

    Did he mention anything about the peaceful protesters?

  17. Making money online more than $15k just by doing simple work from home. I have received $18376 last month. Its an easy and simple job to do and its earnings are much better than regular office job and even a little child can do this and earns money. Everybody must try this job. Click For Full Detail.

  18. ????eat????at????home????

    “But we have to save our restaurants” is a noble sentiment, but wasting limited amount money on expensive vanity items is not a good idea in a pandemic. In January 2020, buying a venti size drink at Starbucks for 5 bucks instead of spending 2 dollars more for a roast ground coffee that would last you a month was a non factor. Now it’s a waste of money if you do it 4 times a week.

    I tried to buy a six pack of soda and Amazon charged me 6 bucks for delivery, which is almost as much as the actual product. No freaking way, I’ll just drive 15 mins to Walmart.

    Obviously the author is making the necessary adjustment in the covid economy, but it’s in the interest of the nation for its people to spend judiciously. I fear a certain crash is looming in the distance because people are spending money on convenience that should probably skip. All those delivery charges and credit card use will catch up eventually, and the government can’t keep sending you checks forever.

  19. STAY HOME AND STARTING WORK AT HOME EASILY… MORE AND MORE EARNING DAILY BY JUST FOLLOW THESE STEPS, I am a student and i work daily on this site and earn money..Go this site home media tech tab for more details thanks you.CLICK HERE══════►► USA TODAY  

  20. Google easily work and google pays me every hour and every week just $5K to $8K for doing online work from home. I am a universty student and I work n my part time just 2 to 3 hours a day easily from home. Now every one can earn extra cash for doing online home system and make a good life by just open this website and follow instructions on this page………click for jobs its a limited offER.

  21. helpful information thank you

  22. Jobma an online video interview platform that helps you structure recruitment interviews using live video, screen sharing, and analyzing the recordings.

Please to post comments