Drug War

Here Is What Police Found (and Didn't) After Deadly Houston Drug Raid

The search warrant inventory does not include any evidence of drug dealing.

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Houston Police Department

Last Friday the Houston Police Department released the inventory of items seized during the January 28 drug raid that killed a middle-aged couple and injured five narcotics officers. Strikingly absent is any evidence that Dennis Tuttle and Rhogena Nicholas were selling drugs from their house at 7815 Harding Street, notwithstanding Police Chief Art Acevedo's portrayal of them as scary, heavily armed, locally notorious heroin dealers.

According to the warrant affidavit, a confidential informant bought heroin from a man matching Tuttle's description at the house the day before the raid, when he reported seeing a "large quantity of plastic baggies" containing heroin. Instead police found "approximately 18 grams of marijuana" and "approximately 1.5 grams of an unknown white powder" that Acevedo later identified as cocaine. These are personal use quantities that are not consistent with drug dealing. Nor did police find any equipment, supplies, or cash indicative of drug sales. The inventory does not mention scales, bags, or heroin paraphernalia. It does not even mention the police-supplied money that the C.I. supposedly used to buy heroin from Tuttle, which should have been identifiable by serial numbers recorded before the purchase.

The other four items in the inventory are guns: a 20-gauge Beretta ALS shotgun, a 12-gauge Remington 1100 shotgun, a Remington 700 bolt-action rifle, and a .22-caliber Winchester 190 semi-automatic rifle. The list does not include the .357 Magnum revolver that police say Tuttle fired at the officers who broke into his home, shot his dog, and killed his wife. Nor does it mention the 9mm semi-automatic handgun that the C.I. supposedly saw in the house the day before, which apparently disappeared along with the heroin and the money.

"There's nothing identified in [the] search warrant return as scales or baggies, or anything that would be used to distribute heroin—or any other drugs, for that matter," Val Zuniga, a local defense attorney who specializes in drug cases, noted in an interview with KTRK, the ABC station in Houston. "It's not the amount of drugs that would be associated with distribution. I think in this case the officer probably relied on an unreliable informant."

That much seems pretty clear, but it does not get the narcotics officer who applied for the warrant off the hook. "The confidential informant has provided informant [sic] and assistance to officers in the past on at least ten (10) prior occasions which has lead [sic] to narcotic arrests and seizures," wrote the officer, whose name is blacked out in the publicly released copy of the affidavit. "The confidential informant has proven to be credible and reliable on many prior occasions." Before sending the C.I. into the house, the officer told him that "narcotics were being sold and stored" there, so it was clear what he wanted to prove and what kind of "assistance" was required.

The officer swore that he searched the C.I. prior to the controlled buy and watched him as he entered the house and emerged from it, which implies that the "quantity of brown powder" (later identified as black-tar heroin) the C.I. presented must have come from there. The officer also said the house was subsequently put under "surveillance," so someone presumably would have noticed if people arrived there to buy all of Tuttle's heroin or if Tuttle came out to dispose of a 9mm pistol between the alleged transaction and the raid the following evening. These inconsistencies may help explain why the HPD recently suspended an officer who was involved in the raid, reportedly because of questions about the search warrant.

Acevedo on Friday reiterated his promise to conduct a thorough investigation of the raid and the events leading to it. "When we are done with our investigation, we will have uncovered and turned over every stone to get at the truth," he said. "We owe that to the involved officers. We owe that to the family of the deceased suspects, and at the end of the day we owe it to the community."

Yet Acevedo seems to have prejudged the outcome of an important aspect of the investigation by claiming "the neighborhood thanked our officers" for raiding Tuttle and Nicholas' home, "because it was a drug house" and "a problem location." He also paraphrased an anonymous informant who called police on January 8 to complain that "her daughter was in the house, and there were guns and heroin." According to Acevedo, "The informant stated she did not want to give any information because they were drug dealers and they would kill her." By contrast, the neighbors who have spoken to the press say they never noticed any suspicious activity at the house and thought Tuttle and Nicholas, who had no criminal records to speak of and had lived on the block for more than two decades, were "wonderful people."

Part of the investigation into the raid will involve sorting through the evidence to support these dueling portraits. We already know which one Acevedo favors.

Update: KTRK, citing "sources close to the investigation," reports that the woman who called police on January 8 was Rhogena Nicholas' mother, who was worried that her 58-year-old daughter "was doing drugs inside her own home." If so, the complaint that set the investigation into motion, culminating in the home invasion that killed Nicholas and her husband, was very different from the way Acevedo described it during his press conference three days later, when he implied that Tuttle and Nicholas were scary "drug dealers" and that the caller was afraid they might kill her. Acevedo also said that two patrol officers dispatched to the house heard a passer-by say "the police are at the dope house" while talking on her cellphone. If the KTRK story is accurate, Acevedo, wittingly or not, misrepresented a family dispute as a tip about drug dealing.

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  1. t Acevedo seems to have prejudged the outcome of an important aspect of the investigation

    Shocking.

  2. So he didn’t shoot five cops with a six round gun how shocking

    1. Plot twist: He did it with the Remington 700.

    2. No .357 revolver on the victim’s inventory?

      Seriously? The Houston cops don’t bring along throw-down weapons any more? That’s been SOP in Houston since the 70s.

      1. Somebody didn’t get the word and picked up the throw-down. I’m sure he’ll be properly disciplined.

      2. Pretty hard to distinguish between a .357 and a .38 Spl revolver…… unless you actually take the time to READ the stampings on the barrel. so WHO made that statement so positively identifying the revolver, and on what basis? Or did one of the attencing coppers decide he liked that handgun and decided to add it to his personal inventory?

        At this point given what we’ve been told one of two things is happening:

        One, one or more of the Houston coppers is/are VERY dirty and lying through their teeth

        Two the entire neighbourhood and the deceased’s mother were in on a masterful frameup of the Houston Police Department.

        And I’m not sure which one I’d put MY money down on……

        In any case, showing up with a no-knock warrent and coming in all combat armed and primed to GO, and in non-uniform into the bargain, is just STUPID.

        I’ve got a better idea.. how’s about we just LEGALISE all that stuff? Then there’d be no more criminal activity leading to guns, secrecy, protection, bought off informants, bribes for lies, $65Bn a year at the Fed level and no one even knows how much at state and lower level “enforcement” and 21 million inmates in our jails for just being stupid and not harming anyone.
        And no, I don’t use ANY of that stuff, not even the innocuous MJ.

  3. Is the revolver missing from the warrant because it was already seized before the 2nd warrant? Or is it like the 3rd suspect and the Hardy street address and is just one of those confusion of the moment things that never actually happened?

    1. AIUI, if the revolver—or any other weapon—was used in the shooting, it would have been sequestered for ballistics testing. Probably at the Harris County Institute for Forensic Science, which is supposedly a non-profit, non-governmental entity that Harris County outsourced its crime lab work when its internal crime lab got caught making shit up a few years ago. My own guess is that the Harris County IFS is about as non-governmental as the Harris County Sports Authority, the entity that issues bonds to pay for the various sportsball boondoggles around the city.

      So that the revolver wasn’t mentioned as part of the items recovered per the search warrant, is not by itself alarming. The revolver was likely recovered, it’s just on another list.

      I’d like some independent confirmation beyond Acevedo’s say-so that the white powder in the bag was coke. It’s been more than enough time to run a sample through a GC/Mass Spec, and know for certain. That, so far as I know, the cops haven’t trumpeted it from the rooftops, means it’s either not coke, or they’re too incompetent to know to publicize the results. Either could be true.

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  4. Houston PD on unicycle back peddling?

    1. Upside down.

  5. >>>”When we are done with our investigation, we will have uncovered

    one too many dead dogs and two too many dead citizens. dicks.

  6. Acevedo on Friday reiterated his promise to conduct a thorough investigation of the raid and the events leading to it. “When we are done with our investigation, we will have uncovered and turned over every stone to get at the truth,” he said. “We owe that to the involved officers. We owe that to the family of the deceased suspects, and at the end of the day we owe it to the community.”

    “And by ‘at the end of the day’ I mean ‘at midnight tonight’. After that, fuck ’em.”

    He also paraphrased an anonymous informant who called police on January 8 to complain that “her daughter was in the house, and there were guns and heroin.”

    Well, what more evidence do you need?

    1. Swatting?

  7. I am not involved in the drug culture. So, if anyone who is wants to correct me, please do. It seems to me that you don’t just casually go into the drug dealing business. You sell drugs either because you use and it is helps support your habit or you do it as a living and do it a lot. In either case, it isn’t something you can do out of your house that will not leave any evidence behind. If you are a user, small time dealer, then the stuff you use is going to be around and certainly the paraphanalia that goes with it. These people were accused of selling heroin. If they were users who were also petty dealers, there would be needles and spoons and burners to cook it with and all that crap. If they were serious drug dealers who did it for a living, they would have had some stock on hand or if nothing else weights and baggies and such and there would be trace amounts of the shit all over the place.

    Since there was none of that, it is pretty clear they didn’t sell any heroin to anyone. Either the cops got the wrong house or the informant was lying.

    1. I am not involved in the drug culture. So, if anyone who is wants to correct me, please do. It seems to me that you don’t just casually go into the drug dealing business. You sell drugs either because you use and it is helps support your habit or you do it as a living and do it a lot. In either case, it isn’t something you can do out of your house that will not leave any evidence behind.

      Given my experience and people I know, you can kind of casually go into the drug dealing business because a lot of people who sell drugs aren’t Johnny Depp in Blow. They’re very, very low-level dealers who say, buy a small bag of pot, use for themselves, and then occasionally sell to family and friends what they don’t use. But once you have things like scales and baggies all over the house, that begins to sound like something a little less casual.

      But yes, the fact that what the cops found (or more accurately, what they didn’t find) amounted to zilch, someone in this story is lying.

      1. I totally agree that there are a lot of part time drug dealers. But those people are users. And if you are a regular enough user to occaisonally deal, there is going to be evidence of it in your home.

        1. “And if you are a regular enough user to occaisonally deal, there is going to be evidence of it in your home.”

          I trust you mean evidence of using, not evidence of dealing. If you are occasionally “dealing” (defined here as selling any amount of illegal substance, regardless of how small) just because you have a bit extra and your friend asked for some — its unlikely there will be any evidence of drug sales occurring in your home.

          For most people that make an occasional sale to friends and family, the only evidence in their home would likely be of using, not selling.

          1. I mean evidence of using. And there was none of that here.

          2. How likely is someone who “make[s] an occasional sale to friends and family” to sell to some informant the cops drug off the street?

            Or to put another way, how likely is it in your situation that the cops’ informant also happened to be someone the homeowners trusted enough to sell drugs to?

            1. Yes. That goes to my point below about the informant just supposedly rolling up to the house and buying drugs. Bullshit.

              1. I have heard that generally, these days, small to medium dealers want some sort of intro before they sell to a new customer. J. Random Junkie showing up on the doorstep and scoring is… improbable.

      2. The entire fuckup was originally based on the wife’s mom purportedly telling the cops that her daughter was using heroin in the house. Cops send a CI with taxpayer cash to score. Does the CI just knock on the front door and say “heard your selling heroin. I’d like to buy some”? Wouldn’t there have to be some other party involved as a connection? The story makes less sense with every passing day. It seems obvious at this point that a gang of armed thugs murdered two innocent people. And their dog. Thanks Jacob for keeping us updated. This kind of reporting is why I hang around here.

    2. Since there was none of that, it is pretty clear they didn’t sell any heroin to anyone. Either the cops got the wrong house or the informant was lying.

      Well, given that he saw a 9mm, but didn’t see a .20 Ga., .12 Ga., the Remington 700, or a .22, I’d say his testimony should at least be highly suspect.

      1. The presence of a gun is what gave them the justification to do a no knock raid. I bet if you went and looked every warrant application the Houston PD has put in over a drug buy for as long as you want to go back contains the same stock language about seeing a gun. I doubt the informant even bothered to look for a gun, assuming he bought drugs from someone at all, or cared. Adding in the part about the gun is just an SOP lie that the police put in.

        1. I’d be interested to know the number that come out with the bold-faced “This was a lie.” like this one.

          Unless you murdered someone right in front of the informant with the 9mm, there’s no reason to get rid of it. If you think your operation is blown, you would get rid of everything, guns included. That the guns are were sitting there, without the drug paraphernalia and without the specifically “identified” gun speaks volumes.

          Not finding the 9mm is one thing. The gun got sold or whatever. Not finding a gun but finding a collection of other weapons unmentioned? Systematic intelligence failure.

          1. It wasn’t a failure. It was just a lie. Like I explain below. As long as you get it right and they are dealing drugs in the house, no one is going to look or care what kind of gun was seen in the affadavit.

            1. It wasn’t a failure. It was just a lie. Like I explain below. As long as you get it right and they are dealing drugs in the house, no one is going to look or care what kind of gun was seen in the affadavit.

              The point you’re getting at is that this isn’t a one-off issue. However, for all we know this CI may’ve, in fact, only lied the one time. From a procedural standpoint, going into a house and not finding one piece of evidence is a one-off failure. The issue is, from the evidence collected, it was a blatant and dangerous lie and, whether the informant lied or not, the department took significant risk to themselves in believing the lie. Falling for a good lie is one thing, believing a bad lie and/or repeatedly accepting the same lie is a systematic intelligence failure.

              1. I don’t think they fell for the lie. They helped create it and tell it.

                1. Agreed.

        2. This is exactly why Houstonians should be enraged at the lazy, feckless judges who sign off on these warrants because they are as guilty as the cops.

          Every judge who repeatedly authorizes bogus warrants is just as culpable in these murders as the cops. Every judge: they all facilitate a corrupt system.

          1. The judge who signed this warrant should be fried over it. But that is even less likely to happen than the cop who lied to get it being held accountable.

            1. Instead, what is happening is that the cops say ‘well, I relied on the Judge’s signing of the Warrant’ and the Judge says ‘well, I relied on the police’s depiction of the facts of the case’.

              Each side points fingers at the other and so neither are held responsible.

        3. “Adding in the part about the gun is just an SOP lie that the police put in.”

          This. It’s no more proof there was a gun there than the language, “Upon approaching the automobile, I detected the strong odor of XYZ intoxicant.” It’s a magic incantation the cops feel they have to recite in order to get what they want.

      2. The victim’s rifles and shotguns were probably in a closet. Since there’s neither a handgun nor heroin in the victim’s inventory, it seems most likely that the CI just made up his story. By including a 9mm in the story, the cops can get a warrant for a paramilitary-style assault.

        This is staight-up murder: the only remaining question is about the motive.

        1. The motivation is they wanted a case and were too lazy and stupid to do the work to get one. Some informant told them there was a house that sold drugs. So they just assumed it was true and lied to get a warrant figuring that they would find something and get a bust and even if they didn’t they would get to terrorize some people. The only reason anyone knows about this is because the guy had a gun and shot back. Had he not, this would have been just another day at the office.

          1. I’m not even sure the guy actually shot back.

            Also, the confusion over Hardy Street and Harding Street hasn’t been explained. Google 7815 Hardy Street and look at the Street View. This looks more typical of a dope dealing operation: a seriously ramshackle house with surveillance equipment (you can clearly see one camera in Google Street View; there’s a video out the house with commentary that there are multiple cameras with IR as well as visible capability.) Recall that the Chief said something about how dope dealers use surveillance equipment, but none was present at 7815 Harding Street.

            1. Cato, I think Acevedo just misspoke. The Hardy Toll Road is a big street in this town. And while the house at Hardy Street does look a lot more like the warrant description than Tuttle’s, there’s a lot of houses in Houston that look like a fortified, camera’d up shithole.

          2. “The motivation is they wanted a case and were too lazy and stupid to do the work to get one.”

            And this. Houston area media had been off and on running stories about the opiod menace, and specifically, black tar heroin. This whole thing smells like some half-assed operation put on so that the cops could meet their numbers. Or it’s something personal, like the idea I had earlier that some neighbor who had beef with the homeowners, also had a friend in HPD, and fed the friend a bullshit story about how the homeowners were dealing dope.

            Add to this that the original complaint was given to HPD by the female homeowner’s mother. I think the CI was lying. I think the CI’s description of the male homeowner, that I had originally thought buttressed his story of buying drugs from the house, instead could just as easily have come from the male homeowner’s drivers licence.

            It makes me wonder whether the affidavit to get the warrant was based on mistakes, or lies. And if lies, how much of the affidavit was an intentional lie.

    3. For those here who are lawyers (I am not one), and especially, criminal law lawyers, how likely is it that two people without felony records, or drug records of any kind, decide to go into the retail heroin dealing business? Weed, I could see it. I had friends who grew some for personal use, and tried to defray the costs with some side sales, often with hilarious results. And prescription drug diversion is prevalent enough that I could see a guy who supposedly had a medical retirement from the the Navy doing something like that. But heroin?

      Again, the scary takeaway from this whole thing, for me, is that Harris County evidently thinks it’s OK to approve a no-knock warrant—whether the cops actually knock and announced or not, the warrant authorized a no-knock—for a suspected drug house where the only PC comes from one citizen complaint, and one buy from a CI, where there wasn’t audio or video verification of the buy. That’s it. No months of surveillance, no pinhole video from a CI, seeing bricks of heroin piled to the ceiling, just one guy saying he saw some heroin, bought a baggie or two, and claimed to see a handgun that wasn’t found later during the raid.

    4. Either the cops got the wrong house or the informant was lying.

      don’t forget that bit in this article….. the one copper who seems to be the contact man for the coppers declared on the warrant for the raid that he had PERSONALLY witnessed the “informant” go into THAT house, after a thorough search of the informant’s person, and come back out with the dope and a report that was a Nine inside. The money the snitch had been given for the buy had the numbers recorded before snitch went in. He did not have the bux and did have the brown dope when he came out. The bills have not been found yet, nor has any more of the brown dope. NOR the Nine. I would sorta think the informant might have thought to mention the fact they have a pit in there, too… IF he was on the up and up.

      SO– either this copper is dirty as a birdie turdie and lying through his teeth, or he is so scary space-headed he needs to be insitutionalised as a danger to himself and society. Nothing in between seems to fit.

      1. I suppose there is an outside change their paid informant had a beef with the folks inside and set them up for the SWATting. If I were anyone but a fly in the wall at Houston PD I’d be sitting THAT guy down for some hard quesitoning, recorded audio and video, of course. Have himdescribe EVERY DETAIL of the supposed buy, then take his nahdler who has NOT heard that interview and do it again, with polygraph on both. Now have a third party listen carefully ot, and read transcriptions of, those interviews, and go out to the scene and see what doesn’t match up. Carefully interview ALL personnel who were on that action, too.
        Someone is lying and that someone needs to cool off in the local Crowbar Hotel for a few years. Two people DIED because of those lies.

        If this were a Couple of Colour there’d be riots alll across the country by now. Hands up don’t shoot my dog.

    5. I did. I had 12-15 friends who liked cocaine. I don’t. So I would buy ounces and deal to them. Get em for $800 make 10 8 balls and sell them for $160. Capitalism at its finest!

    6. Although I have no numbers to back this up, I’m going to say that the majority of all drug sales – by occurrence – are not people seeking to make a business out of it. It’s people selling off part of their own supply, either to convert some back to cash for other uses, or to help out friends/acquaintances who don’t have a trusted supplier. ie. it’s penny ante shit.

      But, I’d also venture that people who use heroin are not going to sell their entire supply for pretty much any reason. A dealer might, but then he’s going to have a wad of cash waiting for his next resupply, and he’s still going to have at least some associated paraphernalia.

      This story stinks more and more.

  8. If ballistics results from the shooting of the cops ever comes out it’ll be interesting to see how many were injured by 9MM rounds, how many by .357 Mag rounds, and how many could not be determined. I’m betting on a lot of “could not be determined”.

    1. There is no way in hell that that guy managed to shoot five cops after being surprised in his home. I will be shocked if he got more than one of them. And it wouldn’t surprise me if it turns out he didn’t even fire a round much less hit anyone. Once the first shot was fired killing the poor dog, I guarantee you that the rest of those monkeys just emptied their magazines without any regard to where they were shooting.

      1. If that guy, in the middle of a police raid, managed to accurately shoot five invaders with a six shooter then he is basically a legendary level of badass. That would be five justified shootings in my mind anyway.

        1. Mine too. This reminds me of the case in Waco a few years ago where the cops supposedly stopped this big biker brawl and the bkers shot several cops, or at least that is what the media claimed. Turned out, the bikers didn’t shoot anyone. The cops all shot each other. They are just fucking animals. No regard for their own safety much less anyone else’s safety.

          1. I think you’re conflating two different Waco police shootings: the biker brawl at Twin Peaks, a year or two ago, and the Branch Davidian thing. No cops got shot at the biker brawl, it was just a bunch of dead bikers. IIRC, McClennan County’s department that deals with crime scene ballistics finally, a year or two after the incident, stated the wounds were almost entirely caused by biker-carried weapons. Which I’m not sure I believe.

            1. I am thinking of the Twin Peakes brawl. It turned out that every biker was shot by cops.

              1. There’s an article at the Houston Chronicle I can’t hotline to, but it claims ballistics showed the cops shot 4 of the 9 bikers. Surprised me when I heard it, as I was pretty sure it’d come out that the cops shot all of them.

                I’m sure I’ll be surprised too by whatever Harris County Institute of Forensic Science comes up with for the ballistics report.

              2. Yeah and over 100 bikers were charged just for being there. I tried to follow the story for about a year but finally gave up hope that anything like justice would prevail. From my perspective as a non lawyer, there were innumerable acts of civil rights violations, constitutional violations, police misconduct, prosecutorial misconduct and judicial misconduct. But nobody gives a shit about a bunch of white bikers so the bad guys win again.

                1. I don’t know if McClennan County’s won a criminal case yet out of that disaster. It did cost the DA at the time his job. I haven’t been paying attention to the cases though.

        2. Has anyone considered the fact that he might have been firing a six shooter with the right hand and flushing tens of pounds of black tar heroin down the toilet with the other? Don’t underestimate his badassery.

          1. More specifically, do the police not know that they can shut the water off to a home and no matter what, they cannot flush ANYTHING down the toilet? Toilets do not work without supply water. Ergo, NEVER a need for a “no-knock warrant”.

            1. The smart dealers keep a 5 gallon bucket of water next to the toilet for that eventuality.

            2. A toilet tank holds enough for a flush even if the water is turned off. I don’t know how far one would carry anything but it would flush once.

              1. once its past the hump in the toilet itself, its gone. If there is enough water to lift it above the trap, there is enough to carry it downhill the rest of the way to the big pipe under the street.

            3. Every single-family home I’ve ever lived in, you had to shut the water to the home off at the street in front of the individual home.

              Doing that means there’s a tiny window of vulnerability where someone sees you fiddling with the front yard and can then flush their 2 KG of shit before you can clear the valve.

              Plus, it forewarns the residents that something’s about to go down.

              That endangers our fine protectors. You don’t want to endanger them, do you? Because then they’ll do ‘no knocks’ on the whole neighborhood simultaneously to prevent that.

      2. This is the odds-on favorite.

        Though, I’m still holding out hope for the “Training Day” scenario. It’s a long shot.

        1. Me too.
          But if so, they really f’d it up.
          If not… they really f’d it up.
          Unless it was just a hit, in which case… they f’d it up, but not as bad as the other scenarios

      3. Oh and it’s four cops that got shot. Two in the face. The fifth guy just ripped up his knee trying to get the hell out of there.

        Which doesn’t disagree with your point that it’s insanely unlikely that one nearly sixty year old guy, surprised in his apartment, managed to score four hits with a revolver on guys with armor. While he was taking fire.

        1. Hey now, what does his age have to do with it? Are you saying 60 is too old to use a gun?

          1. Sure age doesn’t matter, that’s why HRT likes to use 50 year olds as leads when they try to rescue hostages. (Although it does look like Houston P.D. does use them as door kickers, as IIRC, two of the shot officers were in their 50s.) Or why you see plenty of top ranked 3 gunners in their late 50s.

            Reflexes slow with age. Hell, from my own experience in my 40s, the ability to focus on the front sight, and keep everything else aligned, gets really tough. I need to be poor somewhere else and just put a red dot on my pistol already.

            That he was in his late fifties, makes the official HPD story tougher to believe.

            1. Mas Ayoob recently flipped over the Sixty page…. a week or two ago, after eye surgery, he wanted to see if they were working any better than before the fix. He fired, from offhand, 94 rounds in 90 seconds, at five yards, and ALL of them hit theb”chest cavity” outer ring on the paper, nearly all of them hit the instant death ring in the centre. This included mag changes in total time.

              . His assessment of the eye surgery results: I was’t any better but I certainly was not worse than before…. and I’d not done any shooting for a month or so.

              Glad he’s on OUR side…..

              1. Cool, add Jerry to the list. That’s two.

                I like Ayoob’s book, In The Gravest Extreme. Great advice, considering when he wrote it.

        2. Not to mention with a revolver that doesn’t exist apparently.

      4. I could see it being possible, but not likely. If he caught them in their ‘stack’ then even just one or two shots – from head on, and at neck height, could pass through multiple targets. Ballistic vests do not offer much protection for the neck or shoulders.

        Not saying it happened, just saying it’s not impossible.

    2. I still haven’t heard details on the injuries. For instance, were they all shot in the back?

      1. It sounds like at least one officer may’ve stumbled over a coffee table, landed on the couch, and maybe been hit in the fusillade that brought down the notorious Rhogena “Bonnie” Nicholas.

      2. Who knows at this point. In the days after the raid it was widely reported two cops were shot in the neck, one in the shoulder and one in the face. It is hard for me to accept that two got shot in the neck with a .38 and both survived. They are making up new shit as they go along.

        1. It’s not hard for me to believe it. If, and it’s a giant if, the bullet doesn’t lacerate the jugular or carotid, nor cause significant trauma to the cervical spine, there isn’t much else there that’s going to be immediately lethal. Even if the trachea gets compromised. I’ll bet these guys had competent medical care very soon after getting shot (media accounts at the time mentioned repeated LifeFlights), and for handgun wounds, that’s often all it takes to ensure survival.

          Handguns just aren’t very good at killing people. Especially if those people get prompt medical attention.

          1. And, it is possible that some of the wounds were caused by fragments that passed through or off a previous impact point. If so those could be very superficial.

    3. How could the cops have been shot by 9MM rounds or .357 Mag rounds? No such weapons were found at the scene, according to the sworn warrant return that was released late last Friday.

      https://bit.ly/2Buin9Q

      Either the cops “lost” the weapon used to shoot the cops, or there was no such weapon to begin with.

      And, to be precise, 9MM rounds and .357 Mag rounds are the exact same caliber.

      1. .357 bullets are slightly larger diameter, according to Wikipedia. So they should be able to distinguish if they want to. Also, what are the odds that the police used the exact same bullets as the dead guy? (assuming the dead guy did actually fire any).

        1. I stand corrected. 9MM Parabellum bullets are 9.01 MM, and .357 bullets are 9.07 MM. Any bullets recovered from wounds could be identified.

          But where’s the gun/guns?

          1. In a box in the attic, along with the cash and drug merchandising material. That box just got inadvertently labeled as Christmas ornaments on the search results list, and hasn’t been opened yet – – – –

        2. .357 bullets are slightly larger diameter, according to Wikipedia. So they should be able to distinguish if they want to. Also, what are the odds that the police used the exact same bullets as the dead guy? (assuming the dead guy did actually fire any).

          Unless they recover the bullet relatively in tact, they’re effectively the same diameter. The main way you tell the difference via terminal ballistics is penetration depth and/or shockwave effects.

          1. Yeah, I suppose the cops, at least, are probably using expanding bullets. I don’t know what happens to a FMJ bullet in a human body, but I’ve seen a lot come out of wood pretty well intact.

            1. There’s still usually the shank of the bullet, which can give you the number of rifling lands and their twist. Probably a few elemental differences too between e.g., HST or Gold Dots or other expanding bullets.

              1. While I have seen a 9mm revolver they are not exactly common.

                So, consider that automatics also tend to produce ejected shell casings.

                1. As I mention below. Ruger used to make a blackhawk revolver that, through the use of moon clips and an interchangeable cylinder could fire .357 magnum and 9mm through the same barrel.

                  At 1/2″ steel, 9mm, 9mm +P, and .357 magnum are indistinguishable. All you get is smushed lead (assumptions made re: bullet composition), maybe a slightly larger/deeper dent. Round about 1/8″ .357 starts to push through the steel categorically on a straight shots but 9mm won’t without +P and an appropriate barrel/action to handle the extra charge. I’d assume +P+ would work nearly as well as a .357. Glancing nits on a round 1/8″ steel plate are virtually impossible to distinguish. Presumably, this would be easier if 1/8″ steel could bruise.

                  Shell casings are great and all but they don’t exactly tell you which way the gun was pointed and what was down range. If Tuttle fired 5 rounds into the walls and the fuckups in blue shot each other from behind or if Tuttle gunned them all down and they mostly missed him would largely bet determined by entry/exit wounds and angle of travel. They don’t generally dig bullets out of people to see lands and grooves and unless composition was obviously different lead vs. FMJ, any sort of compositional comparison is a crap shoot. Maybe they’d conduct such a thorough investigation to find out who shot whom, but I doubt it. Unless they’ve got an ME with an axe to grind, they’re going to get the usual 3rd person passive voice COD report they want.

          2. The .357 and 9mm differ mostly in the charge, not mass. Caliber and mass are not the same thing.

            The basic relationship when the bullet hits anything is KE=1/2 MV^2. The .357 has higher velocity.

            Velocity counts more than mass in kinetic energy imparted.

            Not so easy to tell always since other variables come into play, distance, the specific ammunition and firearm, degree of fragmentation as is passes through different tissues.

            Here is a review from the medical literature I found interesting. Tables 1 and 2 summarize the energy of common handgun and rifle rounds.

            https://tinyurl.com/Radiologygunshot

            1. Velocity counts more than mass in kinetic energy imparted.

              Yes, that is why a .306 calibre rifle will blow through you and leave you dead before you hit the floor and a .38 caliber handgun won’t kill you unless it hits something vital.

            2. but Nines are much smaller in weight, 9, 115, 124 grain, where .357’s are most often MUCH heavier. Bear in mind, the casings on the nine only hold about half the powder volume as do the .357’s.

              Barrel length also figures in heavily on handguns. In the .38 cal, four and six inch have almost the same downrange velocity. In .357, the four inch has signficantly less than the six. Two, three, even far less. In Nines, four and five inch are almost the same in velocity but the five is more accurate, presumably because its in the barrel longer thus better stabilised. The .38 and .357 testing comparisons I read were using the same bullet weight in the different barrel lengths, and actually tested all the common weights for proper comparison. It WAS barrel length that determined both accuracy and downrange velocity. The theory being that the .357 holds so much powder that the bullet benefits from the extra two inches (between four and six inch length) as it captures more of the power from the burn. Over six inch it slows.. friction from the barrel, they figure, and no more power left to capture.

              1. The last part doesn’t make sense, as 357s velocity out of a rifle is much greater than a pistol. Have a look at something like ballistics by the inch. Extra barrel length to provide for more complete charge combustion is the only reason I can think of.

              2. “but Nines are much smaller in weight, 9, 115, 124 grain, where .357’s are most often MUCH heavier.”

                125 grain .357 Magnum bullets are a popular self-defense load.

            3. The .357 and 9mm differ mostly in the charge, not mass. Caliber and mass are not the same thing.

              I know, I’ve spent some time reloading handgun rounds. I was going by the SAAMI (and personal experience) where, technically, their tolerances overlap (or are allowed to). Ruger used to make a Blackhawk revolver that had an interchangeable cylinder that utilized a moon clip (9mm rounds are rimless) that allowed you to fire .357 magnum and 9mm rounds down the same barrel.

              Again, nothing that I’m aware of prevents officers from having 9 mm +P or +P+ ammunition and/or expanding bullets. Barring that (no reason to, it just seems slightly less likely to me), KE=1/2 MV^2 is irrelevant to anyone not at the scene and even most of the people who were there. The .357 will generally punch through clothing, flesh, metal, glass, and bone further and better than 9mm, but, as I indicated, it’s no guarantee. The best they would do is see that the person receiving 9mm rounds had bullets deflected from his ribs lodged in his chest cavity while the person receiving .357 rounds had shattered ribs and through-and-through wound channels but, once again, this is highly dependent on rounds being off-the-shelf, shots being delivered at optimum angles, targets being roughly similar in mass, etc., etc., etc.

            4. .357 revolvers are often loaded with .38 Police Special rounds to lower the cost, recoil, and muzzle blast. That puts the energy and muzzle velocity much closer to 9mm Parabellum. I doubt you’d be able to tell the difference from the wounds and slugs unless a slug came through virtually intact and was markedly different from the department-issue 9mm bullets. There are also “+P” (hotter) varieties of 38 SP, and moon clips to load 9mm in a .357 or .38 revolver. So the best way to determine what was fired is to find the casings – which for a revolver, usually means you need to find the gun with the expended casings still inside. And if they have that, it should not take long to match most of the slugs to the gun barrels that fired them. (A few slugs may be so smashed up that no rifling marks are left.)

              If they don’t have the revolver that a guy was supposedly shooting at the cops when they killed him, there’s a HUGE problem. It’s not like anyone from outside the department was in the house to pick it up! More likely, it’s on it’s way to a gun lab and the evidence sheet listing it hasn’t been collated with the rest yet – but as messed up as this case seems to have been from the beginning, it’s not impossible that there was no gun and the cops made it up…

      2. Also very peculiar: No ammunition is listed in the inventory.

        1. That is a good catch. Where the rounds in his pistol the only rounds he owned? Seems awfully odd that a drug dealer would not have any ammunition.

          1. That’s just the items they seized, though. They didn’t list any of the guy’s furniture either, but we can assume the house was furnished. They may have sezied the weapons but left the ammunition for said weapons in the house-there’s not necessarily any reason to scoop up all the unused bullets.

            1. If they seized the weapns they would have seized the ammunition. No way they would have left it behind.

              1. Every time I’ve seen cops bragging about a “successful” drug raid they list the ammunition seized.

              2. Yeah, if there’s a shootout, the ammunition, used and unused, is evidence. It would be pretty shitty police work to pick up the rounds spent and just leave the unused rounds sitting in the cabinet.

  9. Part of the investigation into the raid will involve sorting through the evidence to support these dueling portraits.

    I think you mean investigation*s* – plural. We already know (h/t – Verbal Kint) that the cop’s investigation is going to find what the cops want to find, there’s going to have to be multiple news outlets and police accountability groups breaching the stone walls the cops are going to put up to get at the real truth.

  10. This is one of the more insulting things cops do when they get things wrong. They royally fucked up. They are using military style tactics, and they used it on the wrong house to boot. This post hoc attempt to say, “Eh the people we murdered were probably sinners anyway” is entirely besides the point. They could have been running a Dahmer inspired cannibal cult out of their apartment and their actions would have still been incorrect and they should still be severely punished for their actions.

    This is a question of procedure and the evil that powers run rampant inflict, the relative quality of the citizens involved is incidental to that issue.

    1. Even if they were the biggest heroin dealers in Houston, they didn’t deserve to have their door kicked in and murdered. Even if you take it at the cops’ word that they must make an entry quickly to keep the evil dooers from destroying the evidence, that doesn’t justify what happened here. If they had knocked and waited even a minute, this likely would never have happened. And no way is someone destroying evidence of a drug dealing operation in a minute.

      They did this because they like doing it. They like shooting dogs and terrorizing people they are going to arrest. It is fucking disgusting.

      1. This idea that it’s worth risking the life and safety of pretty much everyone involved is justified by the small chance that bad guys could destroy all evidence of a crime in a few minutes really needs to die. They are basically saying that it’s worth it if people have to die so that the cops can arrest some completely replaceable drug dealers, having absolutely no effect on the availability of drugs. They can’t even claim that they are keeping drugs off the streets, since flushed drugs are also off the streets.

        1. They are basically saying that it’s worth it if people have to die so that the cops can arrest some completely replaceable drug dealers, having absolutely no effect on the availability of drugs.

          It should also be made clear that, in this case, they would’ve gladly sacrificed officer’s lives based on shitty intelligence and methodologies to do so. It’s pretty clear from the lack of intelligence that it was a bit of dumb luck that these officers didn’t wade in, outgunned, to a bigger shitstorm than they presumably did.

        2. ^THIS!

          Which is exactly why I say this is just as much the fault of judges as it is the cops.

          The whole point of a search warrant is to have a responsible adult to keep the cops honest.

          The judges have failed in their responsibility.

          1. So SWAT the judges?

            1. We cannot legally condone such actions, nor offer opinion as to whether such actions that should or shouldn’t not be taken are or are not judiciously cromulent

              1. Once again, I’d have to say this falls under the category of “rules I never supported, but that were forced upon me, so don’t be surprised if I don’t get too excited when the other ox is getting gored.”

        3. Devil’s advocate, I’ve heard claimed by LE officers that raids like this do make it more difficult for criminals to put up resistance to the officers serving the warrant, that it’s an officer safety issue, not just an evidence preservation issue. IOW, the one time in a thousand that a homeowner get killed by an entry team because he thinks they’re burglars, freaks the cops out, and the cops kill him, is outweighed by the 10 times in a thousand that some idiot tweaking drug dealer doesn’t want to go back to jail, and decides to start shooting the entry team while they’re stacked up at the front door.

          Which is disgusting—the police should not be allowed to defray the risks of their voluntarily-assumed profession, onto the people they’re protecting—but that’s the logic.

          1. For that one time in a thousand, every homeowner should have an AR-10.

            1. More effective is serious barricade of all doors and windows, and some kind of short barreled firearm which is more maneuverable in close quarters. Best of all from a legal defense point of view is serious delay devices at the entry points and a safe room. Proof of violent entry, and no way to press charges for retreating into a safe room.

              1. My AR-10 ‘is’ a short-barreled firearm, it’s 16″ barrel makes it as short as an AR-15. But it’s got twice the power and is far superior for penetrating barriers (like doors and walls). Or tactical body armor. There are plates that will stop a 7.62X51, but they’re heavy and they cover a rather small area. The rest of the vest is Kevlar, which is just another piece of cloth to 7.62 ball.

                There’s nothing in a modern home that will provide cover for your attackers except a large gun safe, which is going to be in your safe room, if you have one.

                There’s no point in defending yourself with a gun if it can’t stop the people trying to kill you.

  11. 1. Apparently this narcotics officer is barely literate.

    2. Even if they had found a metric ton of cocaine in the house, it doesn’t justify killing the dog, much less two human beings, all of whom were minding their own business and not hurting anyone.

  12. The officer swore that he searched the C.I. prior to the controlled buy and watched him as he entered the house and emerged from it, which implies that the “quantity of brown powder” (later identified as black-tar heroin) the C.I. presented must have come from there. The officer also said the house was subsequently put under “surveillance,” so someone presumably would have noticed if people arrived there to buy all of Tuttle’s heroin or if Tuttle came out to dispose of a 9mm pistol between the alleged transaction and the raid the following evening. These inconsistencies may help explain why the HPD recently suspended an officer who was involved in the raid, reportedly because of questions about the search warrant.

    That story is complete bullshit. Why send the informant in to buy the drugs. Why not send an undercover cop? Further, if the informant had never bought drugs at the house, how did he know they sold drugs there? And if he had, why send him in to buy more?

    1. Since drug dealing is highly illegal, you don’t generally roll up on a drug house and buy drugs like you do at Wall Mart. They only sell to people they know or if someone they know vouches for the person. So, how exactly did this informant roll up alone and buy drugs from someone he had never bought drugs before? That makes no fucking sense. There is no way it happened like that. The whole thing is a complete fabrication. The informant gave the cop an address and said “they are selling drugs there” and the cop just made up the rest. Think about it, 9 times out of ten they find something and no one ever questions the affadavit that results in a bust. So, why go throught the trouble of confirming. Just make up a story good enough to get past the judge.

      I would bet my mortgage payment that is what happened here.

  13. Yet Acevedo seems to have prejudged the outcome of an important aspect of the investigation by claiming “the neighborhood thanked our officers” for raiding Tuttle and Nicholas’ home

    1. “Thank you! Thank you, brave officers, for creating a war zone right next door! It’s just what the neighborhood needed!”

      1. I, for one, have always wanted to live next to the O. K. Corral.

        1. The O.K. Corral shooting probably would not have happened if the Canton boys had been allowed to ride out of town with their guns, which was legal in Tombstone. The Cantons were gangster, but the Earps were not plaster saints either. Not good guy v bad guy but more like Crips v Bloods.

          1. It really matters who survives to write the history

    2. Bullshit. Why did they thank them? Who did this? What things about the people who lived in that house caused the neighbors to thank them and why haven’t these things been made public?

      Complete fucking lie.

      1. Now, John. Those thanks were made *anonymously*, like the allegations.

      2. Not that I believe the line. However, I do believe that there are copsuckers out there, sucking so hard that the police could shoot their neighbors dead on the flimsiest of flim-flam excuses and they’d still say, “Thanks!” The kind of people who will watch live footage of a mass shooting taking place in a gun-free zone and think “We need more gun-free zones.”

        1. Or they might act all nice and grateful to the cops hoping that it will reduce their chances of getting shot by them some day.

          1. Well, the police Union Boss did say he was taking names.

        2. “However, I do believe that there are copsuckers out there, sucking so hard that the police could shoot their neighbors dead…”

          Yea, and unfortunately I think I am related to the majority of them. Every person in my family is a “Back the Badge” copsucker. Hence I am the black sheep that no one in my family likes. Fuck ’em. The badge is wonderful…until it comes for you.

          1. Yea, and unfortunately I think I am related to the majority of them. Every person in my family is a “Back the Badge” copsucker. Hence I am the black sheep that no one in my family likes. Fuck ’em. The badge is wonderful…until it comes for you.

            Mine aren’t that far in the bag but close enough that I could picture them never being shown that they are, objectively, condoning murder in support of a police state.

            1. Most people dont think much about it.
              It’s not like corporate media’s covering it.
              The majority of people have largely neutral to positive interactions with police throughout their lives, and respect/appreciate the uniform (plus the ostensible purpose ((myth)) that they’re there to “protect and serve”).
              Ignorance is bliss… unless your front door is kicked in and your pets and family are slaughtered.
              But it’s a bit too late then

      3. This. These cops are absolutely despicable sub-human abominations.

      4. Apparently the neighbors who actually went on the record told an entirely different story. If any neighbors actually thanked the cops because this was a drug house why weren’t they at the press conference? The chief is making shit up.

  14. But why even bother reporting on this police misbehavior? What are we supposed to do about it? Reason should really stop covering these incidents, right Ken?

    1. Not only that, but they’re not telling me what I’m supposed to think. This is just a straight up reiteration of some facts on the matter. What a waste of an article.

      1. Having read Ken’s position in the previous thread, this is an accurate interpretation of Ken’s position. That said…

        Human communication is subjective, and there’s a largely voluntary element that is generally unnoticed. It’s all very Tower of Babel.

        Let’s assume that Ken isn’t a pro-statist fuck. I KNOW. It seems we have him dead to rights at the moment, ripe for mockity mocking. Just for giggles, let’s roll with another interpretation, say.

        I know Lenore bugs the fuck out of me. She acts as if people’s children being kidnapped, families being terrorized, is just another feather in her cap. Oh, here’s this rando that no one gives a damn about, let’s take three minutes out of our day to goggle at their pain, buy my books, click my bait, ME ME ME. There’s little indication these are real people to her. There’s little follow-up. These people are just grist to her free range blog mill. Any families being terrorized or children being significantly damaged on taxpayer dollars that doesn’t sound “free range-y” enough, well, never mind that. Her schtick is middle-class/upper middle class kids riding the subway to Whole Foods in peace, and anything that doesn’t fit the schtick is unimportant. It doesn’t serve her bottom line.

        Robby is quite similar. He’s a click-bait whore, and I have to backhandedly applaud him for not even pretending not to be some Buzzfeed-worthy fishwife in it for the bait at this point.

        1. Sullum has generally earned better cred, and seems royally fucking pissed (you go, Sully!), and fair bananas to him on that. Perhaps he’s being tarred with the clickbait brush. Perhaps Ken is just fucking done listening to this clickbait shit by now (Ken’s outraged!). Maaaaybe Ken wants to see some fire, some spittle, some sinew and bone and goddamned American mettle, and he’s not sitting idly by while yet another completely un-fucking acceptable story is degraded to just another faintly masturbatory sick story of America that we all ignore because we have to work in the morning and no one cares what we think anyway.

          If this is the status quo, then maybe Ken thinks the status quo can go get stuffed. I don’t know. I don’t know Ken well enough to read his mind. I’m just positing that there may be another interpretation besides Ken being a statist fuck. He certainly doesn’t have a history of loving the state. Yes, there’s some weird reactions (Ken’s outraged!) and yet we can all react weirdly to weird circumstances. Perhaps we should ask him to clarify.

          And maybe Ken’s just an asshole. I don’t know. I don’t know the man well enough to say for sure. I know him well enough to cast a doubt, however. I would like to upgrade our communication in this regard. I am not sure the statist fuck explanation – however neat and tidy it may seem – fits here.

        2. Your characterization of Lenore Skenazy is inaccurate. She does follow-up on these incidents, all the time. She kept up with families she helped on her TV show, and she keeps in touch with the people affected by the busybodies, CPS, and police to see how things progress for them. If you’re only reading the occasional article posted here I can understand how you might miss out on all that though.

  15. In other Texas news: ‘Rage Yoga’ Uses Beer, Cursing To Release Stress

    “We are all angry about something and we all have been holding onto an ‘F’-bomb for a little bit too long,” said Duzich. “So that’s what this does ? is ? it allows you to have a safe space to let go of your and frustration and rage in a healthy way? and then also wash it all away with some ice cold beer.”

    Think I’ll stick with the “Laugh Yoga”.

    1. The yoga part of it kinda seems like an afterthought.

    2. Are they just putting the word “yoga” in there to gentrify the procedure a little?

    3. I’ve been drinking beer and cursing for decades. I did not not know there were health benefits.

  16. In other crime news …

    Jussie Smollett’s neighbors cast doubt on his attack story

    “I don’t believe it happened the way he said it did,” said Agin Muhammad, who lives in the same swank high-rise near the Navy Pier as Smollett.

    “I’ve been in this neighborhood five years. I don’t believe it, not around here ? Half the people are gay and the other half are black.”

    1. 15 homeless people froze to death in one night in Chicago during the recent cold snap. There are hundreds of murder cases that are unsolved. And in the midst of all that, the police dropped everything and spent thousands of man hours on a case because some D list celebrity got a black eye from his drug dealer or hook up or tranny hooker who who knows who. This case is a perfect example of everything Progs claim to care about but in fact don’t.

      1. “15 homeless people froze to death in one night in Chicago during the recent cold snap.”

        Isn’t that the same cold snap that Jessie is claiming these MAGA-hat people were braving with rope and weapons in-hand just for the off-chance that a gay black man would come strolling by for them to attack?

        1. Yes it was. I mean who doesn’t want to go out in 20 below weather to find a black guy, who is likely to be armed and make attacking him a contact sport to beat up in the name of MAGA?

    2. Yeah I don’t believe a thing about this guy’s story. Literally no one that lives in that city would openly wear a MAGA hat, let alone declare that its “MAGA country”…. or, you know, sit around at 2AM when its negative degrees outside with some extra rope, weapons, etc. on the off chance that a gay black man would walk by. It just doesn’t add up.

      1. Chicago proper is a majority black city and full of areas in the words of Rick in Casablanca I would advise against invading and people you definitely would not want to meet. The idea that some crazy redneck Trump supporters would go to Chicago and pick out a random black guy to beat up has to be the stupist thing I have heard in a long time. There is no way in a million years that happened.

        1. It was, proportionally weighted, the most pro-Obama county in the country and it got more blue in the ’16 election.

          Robby should be beaten over the head with stories like this every time he says somebody’s claims shouldn’t be dismissed out of hand.

    3. But what percentage are gay and black. Those are the ones targeted by the MAGAs.

  17. The crime sucks puss from boils,but the cover up and ass covering should be the undoing of HPD and its chief.

    Aside: The Winchester 190 is one the guns recently reclassified as a “semi-automatic assault rifle” by Washington State’s assault weapon laws. It’s a wonder Bloomberg and Everytown aren’t in there cheering HPD for preventing another Parkland. The gun control nuts cheered ATF over the June 1970 shooting of Ken Ballew, why should anything change?

    1. A Winchester 190 is a .22 isn’t it? It is a squirrel rifle for God’s sake.

      1. It’s a .22 calibre assault rifle.

        1. An M-16 is a .22 caliber assault rifle.

          The Win 190? Not so much.

      2. The Washington law copies the ATF GCA 1968 definition of a semi-automatic rifle as its definition of a “semi-automatic assault rifle”.

        I’ll bet if it’s repealed for vagueness and overreach, there will be the usual attacks on NRA extremists gun nut lobby buying the courts and legislature, please send money to Everytown (run by a billionaire Bloomberg)..

      3. Yes it is… so are the Marlin, Remington, Mosberg, Ruger semi-automatic .22 rifles. I went to bed on election night and did not own one “assault rifle””, nor any AR, AK or similar style “black and ugly” rifles. In the morning when I woke up I learned that I now have nearly a dozen of them….. because they redefined tin can murdering Ruger 10/,22 as “assault rifle”. Funny thing, by Browning BAR in 7.62 x 57 (.30.06) deer rifle is now another “assault rifle”, as is my Ljungman 6.5 x 55. None would ever have beenquestioned prior to the new Bloomie Bill.Now ALL of them, yes, the Ruger 10/.22 included, are renamed and reclassified in Washington.

        Oregon had a cookie cutter ballot intiative being passed about for signatures, and was challenged forthe sameserious faults WA’s was. Both came out of Bloomie’s twisted black heart. Oregon’s Supreme COUrt tossed it out as illegal, WA’s corrupt high court let it go onto the ballot. False misleading advertising duped enough lazy voters it got approved, but cannot stand legally.

        1. The really fun part is that an M1 Garrand is NOT an assault rifle.
          (It only has a bayonet lug, none of the other ‘bad’ things)

  18. “a 20-gauge Beretta ALS shotgun, a 12-gauge Remington 1100 shotgun, a Remington 700 bolt-action rifle, and a .22-caliber Winchester 190 semi-automatic rifle”

    So, super-boring sporting long-arms, right.

    (And ref above, WA’s utterly daft law has no exception for .22s, or tube-fed.

    Because of them DANGEROUS Marlins and Remingtons!)

    1. All Reason posters should be OK with banning those nasty .22 rifles. They are used to kill squirrels, and Reason cannot really exist with the squirrels – – – – –

  19. How the HELL did our government(s) ever decide THEY had the right to tell me what I can put in MY body? Good grief, it is legal to kill a baby close to being delivered from its mother’s womb, but I can’t snort cocaine if I want to? (I hate drugs, by the way). The only way to solve the HUGE number of problems the government at all levels cause the citizens they pretend to represent (they, in actuality RULE them!) is to CUT government at all levels by at least 50%. We need a constitutional convention to reduce the power and cost of government at all levels, and then perhaps we will actually be a free country again. We don’t need a DOC, we don’t need a FDA, we don’t need 90% of the crap the feds and lower level governments force on us. In a perfect world, there would be NO federal government, only county and state, and the citizens of THOSE places would get to decide what was legal. One state’s citizens may approve dope smoking, and another not, but telling the whole country no dope for you (again, I hate drugs, except for beer) is an OUTRAGEOUS act.

    1. CUT government at all levels by at least 50%

      CUT government at all levels by at least NINETY PERCENT

      There. FTFY.

      Constitutonal convention won’t fix a thing… we already HAVE a perfectly good Constitution. It is just not being upheld…. by all those government employees who SWEAR to uphold and defendit then don’t. So, what’s “on the books’ is meaningless until IT IS ENFORCED.

      NOWHERE in the Constitution do FedGov get any authority to regulate, restrict, prohibit anything we do/do not put into our bodies. Yet we have a formerly common weed listed as a “Schedule One COntrolled Substance” (the definition of which does NOT include said weed) and people are prosecuted and imprisoned at HUGE expense because it is so listed.

      If we were to FOLLOW that Constitution, no more DEA, BATF, War on (some) Drugs, FDA, Ed, FBI (standing army enforcing “criminal” law, prohibited), federal lands anywhere, BLM, Nat Parks OR their “police”) USFS, EPA.

      What is needed is CRIMINAL prosecution of ALL holders of public office who fail to uphold their oaths of office and act in accordance with state and federal Constitutions. If they don’t do that now, what says they will if we hold a ConCon and chnage the flyspecks on the paper we SUPPOSEDLY operate under?

    2. Or just prohibit government from initiating force.

  20. Tell my why this isn’t the most likely scenario:

    1) Incompetent cops assault Harding Street address instead of Hardy Street address.
    2) The family dog rushes to the front door, and a trigger-happy, roid-fueled cop blasts away per SOP.
    3) In the confusion of the moment, the lady of the house becomes frantic upon seeing the summary execution of the family pet, and rushes the cop, attempting to take his gun in a futile attempt to save her dog.
    4) The house becomes a free-fire zone; not only does the whole murder of trigger-happy, roid-raging cops wantonly shoot all occupants, but also treat each other to friendly fire.

    This story sounds like something out of the Philppines or the favelas in Rio.

    1. 4) The house becomes a free-fire zone; not only does the whole murder of trigger-happy, roid-raging cops wantonly shoot all occupants, but also treat each other to friendly fire.

      They don’t have to be trigger-happy, roid-raging cops. At the point where they’ve killed an innocent woman, they’ve got to make a choice whether they’re going to leave witnesses and testify against one another or not.

    2. Change number 3, dog shooting asshole tripped over the coffee table and landed on the couch next to Nicholas who then puts out her hand to try to keep the loaded shotgun that just killed her dog out of her face, prompting all additional officers to mag dump due to her “trying to disarm” officer klutz.

      1. Let’s go to the tape. Wait. No body cams?

  21. Does anyone find the CI claiming a 9mm semi-automatic pistol to be oddly specific? I can probably tell the manufacturer (Glock, Walther, Springfield, etc) of most common pistols from a few feet away, but I’m not going to be able to tell you the caliber unless I actually read the stamping on the slide.

    Something described more generic (i.e. black semi-auto pistol or shiny revolver) is a little more what I would expect from a quick, across-the-room observation.

    The fact that 9mm semi-auto are probably the most common guns out there sounds like boilerplate B.S. for getting the raid/warrant authorized.

    1. Yes it is oddly specific. Unless it is a beretta or a colt .45, I couldn’t tell one automatic pistol from another, other than that glocks are very ugly. You sure as hell can’t tell the calibre.

      1. There is one position from which you can see the caliber, but most who have been in that position could only describe the muzzle opening as “(expletive deleted) huge” no matter what the caliber was.

  22. In The Declaration of Independence [that thing Americans get all riled up about on the 4th of July but NEVER bother to read], two of the grievances cited against the Crown were:

    “For Quartering large bodies of armed troops among us:
    “For protecting them, by a mock Trial, from punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States…”

    So now we have HEAVILY-ARMED TROOPS (militarized police enforcing VICTIMLESS “crimes”) but, since the sheep have been so well-conditioned, THEY DON’T EVEN BOTHER WITH “MOCK TRIALS” FOR THE MURDERS THEY COMMIT!

    In SO MANY ways, the people of British America didn’t have it as bad as we do today!

    1. ^^^+++100. The United States is right now today a full fledged police state by any reasonable definition wherein government thugs murder and plunder every day under color of law with absolute impunity.

    2. Similar police-assisted lynchings of innocents were committed on July 4, 1929, when the Herbert Hoover administration was tasked with enforcing possession of beer as a felony. See: http://tinyurl.com/y4ln7gn3
      One of the victims’ granddaughter is married to a gentleman who has twice run for office on the Libertarian party ticket. THAT is what makes a difference and changes the bad laws that produce bad cops.

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  27. Somebody give Sullum a raise for producing objectively cogent reporting on this disgraceful mess. These are the sort of persistent facts voters must face. Similar murders were being committed when I was still a kid, and the Governor’s mansion was burned down not too long ago in apparent pushback. The unknown arsonist is locally regarded as a more valuable citizen than anyone in the Statehouse.

  28. the woman who called police on January 8 was Rhogena Nicholas’ mother who was worried that her 58-year-old daughter “was doing drugs inside her own home.”

    There is a special place in hell for people who make this sort of police call, and there’s an even more special place for people who make it regarding a member of their own family.

    Scum, utter scum.

  29. If simply owning a gun is reason for a no-knock warrant Arizona is in trouble because about everyone in Arizona owns a gun Arizona has 6,392,017 People, and 5,676,111 Guns… 99.9% of people do not want to shoot at police, but will shoot someone breaking into their home. What would you do with people breaking into your home?

    Stop these no-knock warrants…

    If they’re worried about someone flushing the evidence… It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to shut off the water at 5AM and wait for someone to call the water company to complain, then knock on the door they can’t flush shit….

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