Marijuana

California Police Chief Claims Legal Weed Delivery Could Lead to 'Assaults and Homicides'

It's a scare tactic, and an inaccurate one at that.

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Screenshot via StopWanderingWeed.com

A proposal under consideration in California would allow marijuana businesses to deliver weed straight to people's doorsteps, even in places where it's illegal to sell pot.

Sounds convenient, right? Not according to Morgan Hill Police Chief David Swing, president of the California Police Chiefs Association (CPCA), who warned the proposal could lead to robberies, assaults, and homicides.

It's been nearly two years since California voters approved a ballot initiative legalizing marijuana for recreational use, and more than eight months since the measure took effect. But marijuana sales are still banned in almost 85 percent of cities and counties in the state, according to Weedmaps. As a result, advocates on both sides are still debating whether or not cannabis retailers should be able to deliver their products to homes in localities where selling pot isn't allowed.

A 2017 state law says "a local jurisdiction shall not prevent transportation of cannabis or cannabis products on public roads" by marijuana retailer licensed to make home deliveries. Alex Traverso, a spokesperson for the California Bureau of Cannabis Control (BCC), tells the Los Angeles Times that the proposal currently being considered would "clarify" that licensed retailers can "deliver to any jurisdiction within the state of California."

In recent days, the BCC has held several public hearings to gauge public opinion on the proposal. Bureau chief Lori Ajax will also consult with Gov. Jerry Brown before making a decision.

Approving the proposal would simply reaffirm the decision California voters made in November 2016, say its supporters. The proposal's detractors say that selling delivering weed to people's doorsteps violates local bans on pot sales. They also claim it will lead to more crime.

"This will make it easier and more lucrative to rob a delivery person than a liquor store," Swing tells the Times, explaining that the proposal would permit delivery drivers to carry as much as $10,000 in cash apiece. "Robberies are the tip of the iceberg. They can lead to other crimes, including aggravated assaults and homicides," Swing adds.

The CPCA is working with the League of California Cities to lobby against the proposal. Their website, StopWanderingWeed.com, emphasizes the need to "protect our children and schools." At the top of the website is an illustration of a group of schoolchildren looking up a truck with a marijuana leaf logo imprinted on it.

Linking marijuana to crime—particularly violent crime—is a common scare tactic. In February 2017, for instance, Attorney General Jeff Sessions expressed concern about the "violence around marijuana." But the evidence doesn't back up those sorts of arguments.

According to a Snopes fact-check, there's "no credible evidence" linking legalization of recreational marijuana to an increase in violent crime. In a piece for Reason last October, Steve Chapman made a similar point:

Studies show that after Colorado permitted recreational pot, there was no increase in adolescent use or traffic fatalities. In Washington, which voted for legalization in 2012, crime rates proceeded to decline. California found that when medical dispensaries closed, neighborhood crime didn't fall; it rose.

Along those same lines, a June 2017 study in The Economic Journal found that legalizing medical marijuana in states bordering Mexico actually led "to a decrease in violent crime," as Mexican drug cartels lost their stranglehold on the weed market.

Allowing California marijuana retailers to make home deliveries statewide will not magically make crime skyrocket. California voters have already made their choice on the matter, and the BCC shouldn't stop consumers from enjoying weed delivered straight to their front doors.

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  1. Not according to Morgan Hill Police Chief David Swing, president of the California Police Chiefs Association (CPCA), who warned the proposal could lead to robberies, assaults, and homicides.

    He’s absolutely correct. The police will be out there robbing, assaulting, and killing the people delivering weed.

  2. …who warned the proposal could lead to robberies, assaults, and homicides.

    I said the same thing when they legalized pizza delivery but did anyone listen?

    1. He’s right though. Pizza delivery gets people beaten and killed. Cannabis will be the same. Doesn’t mean either should be illegal.

    2. During da foosball, there was a commercial for Dominos talking about “hot spots” where they would deliver to places other than a verifiable address. Unless I’m missing something, sounds like the want their delivery drivers to get robbed way more often.

      1. Evil corporashunz don’t care about employees or customers or the products, just evil profitz.

        1. And there’s no better way to make profits than by killin gyour employees and shitting on your customers.

          1. It where the real money is.

  3. “But marijuana sales are still banned in almost 85 percent of cities and counties in the state…”

    What a clusterfuck!!! To smoke pot, I have to have the Galactic-Cluster dictator approve, then the Galactic Emperor, then all the planetary councils in our solar system, then Der TrumfenFuhrer and Jeff Sessions, then the Sate Pigs, then the county, then the city, then the local homeowner’s association, then the local dogcatcher, and then I have to give up my rights to self-defense, and then…

    WHO THE HELL KNOWS what is next?!?! Is pot REALLY actually legal ANYWHERE, according to ALL of our self-appointed ninnies and nannies?!?!

    1. Pot is legal everywhere you don’t get caught.

    2. Canada. Read about the new cavity searches, Berlin Wall and forced confession forms at the border…

      1. You mean this article’s content, and so forth, that just about makes me shit my pants?

        https://reason.com/blog/2018/09…..uana-users

        WHEN will anti-pot fascism come to and end? WHEN!?!?!

        1. Right after lung flutes are sold at dollar stores.

          1. Touche! SOMEONE has been listening to my “Libertarian GRRRRRR” theories, as one of my offspring calls it!

  4. Look, it’s very simple. Arresting people and putting them in jail reduces crime.

    1. Dammit, squirrels are hungry today. As I was saying:

      Arresting people and putting them in jail reduces crime. Ergo, the more reasons we invent to arrest people and put them in jail, the less crime there will be. Duh.

    2. If you don’t count the crimes committed by police and prosecutors.

      1. Look, do you want that omelet or not?

  5. The proposal’s detractors say that selling delivering weed to people’s doorsteps violates local bans on pot sales

    Truly the cornerstone on which their municipal governments rest.

  6. The Constitution allows Congress to have post offices, NOT a weaponized monopoly. But the monopoly was nevertheless created in 1851 to put Lysander Spooner out of the mail delivery business. That made it possible for Republican Comstock laws to ban all birth control and impose strict Islamic censorship 22 years later. There is something odd about Californians re-instituting Saudi-style prohibitionism. Is this on account of plant leaves or alcohol profits in a tax-and-rob mixed economy?

    1. The US Constitution tells the current federal government to go fuck itself up the ass.

  7. KILLER WEED! REEFER MADNESS!

  8. Better ban UPS and FedEx. I’ve seen documented proof on Youtube of thieves stealing packages right off porches!

  9. I have a confession: I order pizza and packages so I can kidnap and store the cute delivery boys in my barn. It’s a shame I don’t live in Cali because this would totally help me in my quest to increase my collection.

  10. He’s probably right: Drivers with up to $10K in cash on them will be targets for robbery. Of course the solution is for the 85% of counties that have created the problem (which the drivers are trying to solve) of people not being able to get products they want.

  11. David Swing, president of the California Police Chiefs Association (CPCA), … warned the proposal could lead to robberies, assaults, and homicides.

    It *could* lead to uncontrollable diarrhea.

    Swing and a miss.

  12. Sort of like black market gang warfare? Oh wait, we have that now with illegal drugs.
    Any Coors or Budweiser trucks getting shot up lately?

  13. I’ll smoke what I want.

    I don’t need a stinking permission slip from government to do so .

  14. This story is factually incorrect. I live in a Bay Area locality where retail pot shops are illegal, but there are over twenty outfits that will deliver to your home or business. The service from most of the is great–sometimes within the hour. The Morgan Hill Police Chief is wacko, needless to say.

  15. “who warned the proposal could lead to robberies, assaults, and homicides.” he forgot to add the raping of the white women!

  16. “California Police Chief Claims Legal Weed Delivery Could Lead to ‘Assaults and Homicides'”

    So do pizza deliveries, you choad!

  17. Pizza delivery leads to assaults and homicides.

    Shitty people like to take other people’s stuff. It’s not unique to weed.

  18. Weed delivery has worked out pretty well in Phoenix.

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