Marijuana

Maine Voters Will Decide Whether to Legalize Marijuana

An initiative that was temporarily derailed by a notary public's sloppy signature qualifies for the ballot.

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Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol

Yesterday Maine's marijuana legalization initiative, which was temporarily derailed by a notary public's sloppy signature, qualified for this November's ballot.

The Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, which needed 61,123 signatures, submitted almost 100,000. But Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap rejected nearly half of them, mostly because they appeared on petitions bearing a notary public's signature that he said did not match the signature on file with the state. Some 17,000 of the rejected signatures—enough to make a decisive difference—were on petitions certified by a single notary, who confirmed that he had signed them. But Dunlap said the notary's petition signature was not a close enough match to the one on his commission. Earlier this month, a judge ruled that Dunlap had read the relevant law too narrowly and ordered him to re-examine the rejected petitions.

"We are thrilled to finally start transitioning into the more substantive phase of this campaign," said campaign director David Boyer. "It has been a longer wait than expected, but nothing compared to how long the people of Maine have been waiting to end the failed policy of marijuana prohibition."

The Maine initiative would allow adults 21 or older to possess, transport, and share up to two and a half ounces of marijuana and grow up to six flowering plants at home, along with 12 immature plants and an unlimited number of seedlings. It charges the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry with licensing and regulating commercial growers and retailers, imposing a 10 percent tax on sales. In addition to ordinary marijuana stores, where consumption would not be permitted, it allows "retail marijuana social clubs," which would sell cannabis products specifically for consumption on the premises.

A new poll by the Maine People's Resource Center puts support for the initiative at 54 percent, with 42 percent opposed and 4 percent undecided. "This November, Maine voters will have the opportunity to adopt a more sensible marijuana policy," Boyer said. "It is time to replace the underground market with a regulated system of licensed marijuana businesses. It is time to redirect our state's limited law enforcement resources toward addressing serious crimes instead of enforcing failed prohibition policies. And it is time to stop punishing adults for using a substance that is significantly less harmful than alcohol."

Maine is the second state, after Nevada, where a legalization initiative has qualified for this year's ballot. Legalization initiatives are also expected to appear on the ballot in Arizona, California, and Massachusetts.

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  1. Obama – end your un Constitutional war on drugs

    I own my body – not your centralized socialist state.

    I have a natural and US Constitutional right to control and defend my own body.

    Now I will puff on some reefer to defy your centralized socialist state.

    1. I don’t think POTUS reads Hit’n’Run, broski.

  2. Maine and Massachusetts both with referenda in November 2016. The prospect of “Live Free or Die” NH sandwiched in the middle provides a Delicious situation of unenforceable stop to supply across the imaginary lines.

    1. Fuckin’ A to that!!!

    2. Our governor here in NH is a POS, and the NH Senate sucks.

      The NH House, whether it’s been controlled by the Republicans or Democrats, has passed marijuana decriminalization multiple times. The Senate has stopped it, and the governor has given veto threats against marijuana decrim.

      We need a new governor and a few more pro-liberty senators.

      1. Hassan is an authoritarian turf. Film at 11.

        1. turd, even

  3. I used to know a number of back-woods Maine hicks who grew their pot in the middle of nowhere. Sounds like next year they will be the equivalent of moonshiners instead of drug dealers. I suppose that’s an improvement. Probably makes no difference since the chance of cops finding pot plants in the woods of Aroostook county is close to zero.

    1. I’ve read enough Steven King novels to know that any cops who DO go looking for pot in the Maine woods will inevitably meet with horrific ends.

      1. Lyme disease, poison ivy, and hypothermia are a bad mix.

        1. Not horrific enough.

  4. allow adults 21 or older to possess, transport, and share up to two and a half ounces of marijuana and grow up to six flowering plants at home, along with 12 immature plants and an unlimited number of seedlings. It charges the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry with licensing and regulating commercial growers and retailers, imposing a 10 percent tax on sales. In addition to ordinary marijuana stores, where consumption would not be permitted, it allows “retail marijuana social clubs,” which would sell cannabis products specifically for consumption on the premises.

    Oooh, “allow”…license, regulate, tax…not permitted. I know this is better than what currently is, but this is not exactly letting freedom ring.

    1. Incrementalism’s a bitch.

      1. No, it’s great! I can make my own whisky in the backyard now, right?

        I suppose I can make beer in the bathtub, so it’s kind of hit and miss.

        1. These masturbation euphemisms aren’t abstract enough anymore.

  5. Gives a whole meaning to ‘down east’

  6. OT:

    Cruz and Fiorina at Tanagra.

    Oh, about her……..strangely enough……..would.

    1. No. Fucking. Way.

  7. “And it is time to stop punishing adults for using a substance that is significantly less harmful than alcohol.”

    Why just one such substance?

  8. “And it is time to stop punishing adults for using a substance that is significantly less harmful than alcohol.”

  9. Their Governor LePage is a POS. He is a drug war crusader and says drug traffickers should get the guillotine in the town square. (He also stoked race war fears with “Guys with names like ‘Money G’ come up here to sell your daughters drugs and have sex with them.) Unsurprisingly he was one of the first to endorse Christie and Trump. (Peas in a pod on this issue.) So this will be a nasty fight, but should at least be fun to watch as the vitriol flies.

  10. The Maine initiative would allow adults 21 or older to possess, transport, and share up to two and a half ounces of marijuana and grow up to six flowering plants at home, along with 12 immature plants and an unlimited number of seedlings. It charges the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry with licensing and regulating commercial growers and retailers, imposing a 10 percent tax on sales. In addition to ordinary marijuana stores, where consumption would not be permitted, it allows “retail marijuana social clubs,” which would sell cannabis products specifically for consumption on the premises.

    This is what I’m fucking talking about!

  11. I quit my office job and now I am getting paid 69 Dollars hourly. How? I work-over internet! My old work was making me miseraable, so I was to try-something different. 1 years after…I can say my life is changed completely for the better! Check it out what i do…UI5

    ========== http://www.Report20.com

    1. 69 dollars, eh?

  12. I don’t know why everyone is putting Arizona in the list. The public passed 3 different referendum over a number of years decriminalizing weed and twice was hijacked by the AZ legislature. Even this time the State Gov’t seems to be kicking and screaming into complying. Unlike OR and WA whose gov’ts seemed to say, “OK, that is the will of the people, it shall be done.” And, of course, the Courts allowed them to do it. FYTW is very strong in the AZ gov’t (Exhibit #1: Joe Arpiao).

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