Libertarian History/Philosophy

Liberland: Disappointing Reality or Encouraging Fantasy?

You probably can't make a libertarian paradise in a Croatian marsh. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't try.

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The New York Times Magazine has profiled in very great length a figure on the exotic fringe of libertarian activism, Vit Jedlicka, a Czech market analyst and political activist, who has proclaimed himself (with the democratic vote of his girlfriend and a pal) leader of a proclaimed nation, Liberland, in a no-mans-land in the Danube River on the border between Serbia and Croatia.

The story details the engineering feats on the river and resulting shifting of pieces of territory away from the contiguous landmasses of Serbia and Croatia that led neither nation to currently, officially claim the crummy piece of land.

Still, neither country gives Jedlicka's proclamation any credence. Croatian police began arresting would-be Liberlanders trying to enter, including their leader Jedlicka, and the Times reporter Gideon Lewis-Kraus witnesses such an arrest during his time dogging Jedlicka around the globe.

It's all theater, of course. No one lives there, and no one I doubt that many people would want to live there—the "there" that is an actual piece of land on planet earth.

Small, cramped, hard to get to and leave, mosquito-riddled, barely space to actually make anything if one wished to do business making things, difficult to find customers if one is providing a service that requires meeting people in person, lacking huge amounts of storage if your business requires owning and shipping inventory.

And if everything you are doing can be done no matter where you live, via the wonders of the Internet, you probably don't want to park your body in the middle of a marshy mosquito-riddled river in Croatia with no pre-existing shelter or civilized services.

Besides, to get along with the community of nations who Jedlicka thinks will accept him, even Liberland will not allow certain things that community of legit nations insists its members bar, like "money laundering" and the sale of certain drugs.

But 40,000 people finished the online application for citizenship in Liberland (of 330,000 who at least started, 87,000 of them Egyptians), and a picky Jedlicka, taking seriously the dictum that rather than letting the people select a new government the government must select the proper people, has provisionally approved but 130 of them as fit for Liberland.

So clearly people might want to live in the idea of Liberland, and it has been surprising how seriously many in the media are taking this whimsy. Lewis-Kraus is not mocking the idea out of hand, even though as a practical reality on earth, it is likely worth mocking. And no doubt the serious tone with which he reports the diplomatic mission through mosquito bogs in a boat overloaded with documentary filmmakers, and the flying around the world to consult with dodgy members of Liberland's far-flung diplomatic corps, is meant in its very seriousness to be ironically mocking.

The Times feature is very very long and details many interesting machinations and personal details about Jedlicka and his efforts to win points in the gamesmanship of the peculiar rules of sovereignty, including trying to get a Czech diplomat arrested by Croatian cops for what was technically just moving from one part of Serbia to another. The story also tells of Jedlicka's various dreams for how actual Liberlandian government would function, including a currency based on efforts toward making the government work. 

It's mostly a story about following a self-important man around the world meeting with small groups of supporters and dreaming dreamy dreams of sovereignty. But it is a very long story, and at worst treats him like an eccentric like someone building a scale model of the Taj Mahal out of Popsicle sticks, and not like an eccentric trying to trap and kill stray dogs.

Jedlicka is the newest part of a checkered but fascinating history of what is known by some in the libertarian world as "libertarian Zionism": trying to create a small polity self-selected to be occupied by libertarians and run on libertarian principles. Recent actuations of this tendency that I've profiled here in Reason include the Free State Project (trying the less radical task of shaping an existing polity in a libertarian direction, in their case the United State of New Hampshire) and the Seasteading movement.

I wrote at some length about previous efforts at libertarian landbuilding, such as "Operation Atlantis" in 1968 (boat sank) and building an Island called Minerva in the southwest Pacific in 1972 (conquered by Tonga), and later in the 1970s  making common cause with rebels in the Bahamas and New Hebrides (like most indigenous rebellions, didn't really work out in a libertarian direction) in that Seasteading story, and at more length in my 2007 book Radicals for Capitalism: A Freewheeling History of the Modern American Libertarian Movement.

However impossible Liberland is, it represents a feeling growing faster and stronger than the states of the world want to recognize. It has had remarkable traction with both media and would-be supporters, far more than any previous such attempt.

Of course, Liberland has the power of the Internet, by which everyone communicates with everyone else everywhere about everything at something approaching costlessness. Operation Atlantis, for its part, tried to give birth to its aquatic nation in a world of mimeographed newsletters that had to be mailed to the small group of people who somehow learned about it through word of mouth, the very rare mainstream magazine mention, or subscribing to other tiny-circulation mimeographed newsletters.

Placing any more weight on the attention Jedlicka's gotten then just that it strikes people as amusingly bold and absurd might be a mistake. Still, it does feel, to someone following these ideas for decades, that they seem inchoately more cool and admirable than insane and stupid to lots of people nowadays.

Jedlicka could argue, rightly, that all nations are "proclaimed," in their way, made real by a combination of legitimizing threats of force and whatever it is in a human that makes him want to proclaim fealty and obedience to a land-based system of abstract rule. (Whatever that is, trying to change society by completely denying that emotion or tendency exists isn't likely to get you very far, human nature being what it currently is.)

Paradoxically, my marination in libertarian history made me a little less interested in this Liberland story as it first broke, less so perhaps than a reporter who could see it purely as colorful, maybe even zany, but of clear human interest with a sharp political edge. It struck me at first as just a wearying repetition of something clearly impossible to make work, at least the way Jedlicka was trying. How could he expect other nations to recognize or take him seriously and deal with him as a fellow sovereign? And how many people really want to live on that piece of land, no matter its governance?

As Reason.com editor-in-chief Nick Gillespie sharply noted back in 2005, even a libertarian should recognize that strictly political concerns don't always dictate where we choose to live. Economic freedom indexes needn't give libertarians moving orders.

We, just like normal people!, value climate, culture, land itself, civic amenities, or family perhaps more than the abstract laws or taxing systems dominating our land mass. I can recognize both that the Free State Project is a neat idea and that I really enjoy the company of most Free Staters I met, and still not want to submit my poor mammal body to New Hampshire weather, far away from most everyone in life I care about. California is a terrible state for taxes and regulations. But because of the land, and the people, and the culture, and the weather, here I stand.

And given the U.S. government's tendency to make sure it grips you when it comes to taxes and regulations if you were born here no matter where your actual body or technical citizenship lies (see Reason editor-in-chief Matt Welch on FATCA), there didn't seem to be much beside cocktail party talk at stake in claiming your citizenship in Liberland. When 30,000 people start building homes there, then Liberland's time has come.

We can already, in terms of fellowship, entertainment, commerce, do a surprising amount of living essentially in what the kids used to call cyberspace. Communication and commerce are two big pieces of the human puzzle, and physical location and citizenship already don't matter that much for those things, as long as you have access to effective shipping services (another thing unclear about Liberland).

The idea behind Liberland is solid: a country governed the way it imagines being governed would be an interesting place to live, do business, earn an income. 

But more than that, I think the attraction, especially to the people profiled in the Times who are actually going there, or to Croatian prison in the attempt, and to the people opening their Liberland embassies in England and France, is not living in Liberland, or even dreaming of it. The attraction is the bizarre and comic political drama of trying to make it real.

The same is likely true for earlier attempts at libertarian zionism. The adventures of being on the ferrocement boat sailing to the Caribbean with fellow Randians or anarchists trying to make a new Atlantis; of making common cause with Vanuatan rebels; of trying to build a seastead; these are not really political efforts.

They are more properly seen as life adventures, that simple and that complex, inherently rewarding experiences here on Planet Earth, regardless of whether those experiences ever had any hope of producing a nation with no taxes or import duties.

While I was never one of those people, I imagine the experience of trying more than justified itself, whether or not anyone doing them even expected the plan could "really work." What seems to outsiders, or sells itself as, political action is very often a consumption/entertainment expense, leisure at its edgiest, striving for a lived experience that makes the spine stiffen, blood rush, eyes open in wonder, lips form a satisfied smirky smile. You are making a libertarian nation! 

Maybe, but man, it's fun to try!

The always-optimistic libertarian Jeffrey Tucker on the promise of the very idea of Liberland:

We live in a digital age that is gradually but systematically breaking down the central relevance of borders, traditional nation-states, and arbitrary lines drawn on a map that politicians call countries.

Technology permits new forms of geographically non-contiguous engagement in commerce, communication, and law. A territory of only a few square miles can indeed become a viable nation: a refuge for those who seek freedom, a nimble competitor to stagnant mega-states, and a model for the rest of the world to follow.

Liberland might indeed fail in the short term. But its ideas and its dream have long-term viability. Old-style political systems and political maps will not rule forever. Change is possible, but it takes visionary steps (perhaps steps like as Liberland) to help push us forward to a future of liberty. 

To me the real relevance of techno-modernity to the libertarian project is how it creates the possibility of meeting needs and evading government control without necessarily having to physically move or politically change one's citizenship.

Technology also, as the NSA shows us, has the danger of making such under-the-radar life even harder. Ultimately, I am optimistic that the technologies of privacy and liberation can outpace the technologies of control; more optimistic than I am that the community of nations will welcome a libertarian-loophole state such as Liberland.

I am not optimistic that any libertarian Zionism—creating an actual small libertarian polity in a non-libertarian world—can ever work. The original Leonard Read (founder of the Foundation for Economic Education) mission for the libertarian movement still seems ahead of us: that we will have libertarian government when enough people have been educated to want a libertarian society.

It does not seem like the existing set of nation states leaves room for one, on an island, boats, or isolated chunks of riverine land in Eastern Europe without shelter or running water but with plenty of mosquitos.

But to the extent people yearn for it, work for it, and are forced to think about how such a nation can work, the efforts are encouraging, and should be encouraged. Though perhaps one ought not rely too much on them actually working.

Elizabeth Nolan-Brown introduced Reason readers to Liberland back in April.

Update: The piece has been edited to remove some earlier infelicities of phrasing in the first posting.

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  1. It is a no man’s land because it is where the Serbs and Croats clash whenever they war with each other. the ground there has been saturated in blood countless times. No one lives there because they know that the next time there is a war every single living thing in that area will be slaughtered.

    Do not go to Liberland.

    1. After reading this I kinda want to go.

      1. He’s just paranoid. Nothing bad ever happens in the Balkans.

      2. I’m getting that the land has been well fertilized and is ready for planting crops.

        1. Mosquito-infested swamps aren’t so bad, I heard of this one guy who built a castle in a swamp. Everyone thought he was daft to build a castle in the swamp, but he built it just to show ’em. It sank, but he built another one. It sank, too, but he built a third one. That one burned down, fell over, and then sank. But he built a fourth one and that one stayed up. And today he has the opportunity to aquire ‘uuuuge….tracts of land.

          1. Funny, but there was a place near me in the Bronx that also was built on a mosquito-ish swamp, and it was called Freedomland.

  2. You know who else took control of the Danube river?

    1. Baron Harkonen?

      1. *THIS* IS GEIDI ALPHA PRIME!

        1. Did anyone else not totally hate the Dune miniseries? I should find that… I remember kinda enjoying it.

          1. I liked it. But, I’m mad and stuff.

          2. The sci-fi one? Pretty much. Very boring.

            The David Lynch movie? Fuck-awesome.

            1. I think I should reread the series, actually. I read it a ton in high school, but I really don’t think I understood it.

              1. What you didn’t understand about Dune, was that Herbert fucking loved mushrooms.

                1. Did you read any of his son’s stuff?

                  I wanted to burn it. I settled for chucking it in the bin.

                  1. First off, I love Dune, and second, nope. Never will.

                    1. His prequel involved a FTL communications device some kid scavenges from the ruins of Ix.

                      I shut it down after that.

                    2. Ok. That’s bad.

    2. Johann Strauss II

    3. The Goths

  3. Cold-hearted bystanders took pictures of him bleeding on the ground rather than helping.

    Hardly any more cold-hearted than the cops who will beat the shit out of you if you get in the way in any other situation. Or the cops who will shoot a man, handcuff him, and then stand around with their hand in their pockets while the dude bleeds to death.

    http://popehat.com/2015/08/14/…..decisions/

  4. “A lot of officers are being too cautious because of what’s going on in the media,” said the officer, who asked to remain anonymous for the safety of his family. “I hesitated because I didn’t want to be in the media like I am right now.”

    Good. Because the proper response would have been to get out your baton and start wailing away at the guy coming at you – but your ‘training’ only leaves you with ‘freeze in fear’ or ‘shoot dead’ with nothing in between.

    1. You see, the problem isn’t that the police are stone-cold killers, lawless thugs. The problem is that the media reports on it.

  5. I would go. Besides, as its own nation, Liberland can opt to eradicate the mosquitoes with DDT. Or, they can set up some bat houses. One single bat will eat 50,000 mosquitoes per night.

    1. That’s all great until they turn into vampires.

      1. The government assures me that there is no vampire menace.

        1. *checks garlic stockpile*

        2. There is nothing to worry about.

          The Croatia-Serbia boarder is at least a half days horse-carriage ride from Transylvania.

          …..

          Wait…

          IT IS ON THE CROATIA-SERBIA BORDER!?!?!?!

    2. “One single bat will eat 50,000 mosquitoes per night.”

      Yeah, but DDT won’t lay eggs in your hair and drive you nuts.

      1. A la vez, hummingbirds eat a ton of mosquitoes… and, what the heck is it with person and mosquito these days? Used to be a lot of places, they exchanged some unpleasant diseases, but this is no longer much concern for decent white folk. Once that got taken in hand, it seems like there was a period of time when people lived with mosquitoes and it wasn’t so blooming awful for folks. There was a ton of huge cocksucking mosquitoes where I grew up, and I can’t recall nebod who had any allergy of any importance to them. The worst they did was fly into a person’s nose or mouth when he’s trying to breathe, and less than that, some people claimed the bites hurt when they was happening or perhaps slightly, briefly therafter. Then I move to more urban West Coast of United States, and I find much less mosquito of much more diminutive size, and almost everyone is ridiculously allergic to the fucking things. To the point that when I’ve commented on it, I get told, “No. We’re not allergic. How can you be so stupid? That’s what a mosquito bite does. It always causes huge painful welts lasting for days afterward.” It’s nothing different in the bugs. I get bit here, same thing happens as if I got bit anytime any place else in the past–not a fucking thing, except maybe, if it’s in just the right spot, there’s a bit of unpleasant sensation at some point whilst the bite is in progress.

        1. There was a ton of huge cocksucking mosquitoes where I grew up

          Really? I’ve only gotten a mosquito bite on my dick once in my life.

      2. Same with people can’t go on the sun and people can’t low the tiniest bit of uncultivated herb to brush their naked bodies without getting all flammed up with some kind of insufferably overreactive immune response. And fucking bees allergies. I never met anybody with a bees allergy till I come here, and here it seems like at least half of any random group of people is mortally allergic to bees. If life were that fucking hostil to me, it wouldn’t be worth it; it’s like perpetual total war with allthing for these folks, like they come from some mirror world where natural selection works backwards somehow and favours the race least fit to survive the vicissitudes of every contingency. On top of it all, they all seem to have the digestive fortitude of anemic little girls with AIDS; the tiniest bit of normal, salutory corruption in their food, and they’re off to the toilet, spewing crap out of every orifice.

    3. One single bat will eat 50,000 mosquitoes per night.

      Bullshit. If one summer night is 10 hours, that’s 5000 an hour, more than one per second. I simply do not believe bats are that efficient.

    4. Batting left- or right-handed?

  6. Where there is a will, there is a way. Why can’t Liberland work? And by saying it won’t work you would rather wallow in self pity. That is the problem with so many Libertarians, we just want to be critics, commentators, and people watchers. When it comes to actually doing something, we shy away from action. We would rather live in the tranquillity of tyranny, than the tumultuous sea of liberty. So what if it is a mosquito ridden swamp, what do you think Washington D.C. use to be? Did you know Liberland is 3 times the size of Monaco (over 30,000 people live in Monaco). Stop being an armchair statesman. Be the change you wish to see in the world.

    1. “So what if it is a mosquito ridden swamp”

      Well you convinced me. I done with this air conditioning, indoor plumbing and high speed internet!

      1. I wonder what your house looked like before it was built. Are you telling me that no Libertarian knows about construction? plumbing? communications? Even if we don’t know, find someone that does and pay them…

        1. “Are you telling me that no Libertarian knows about construction? plumbing? communications?”

          Yes, because they’re all na?ve little boychildren, living high on the hog at the expense of the community, who can’t understand how things work in the real world. The only reason they get through the day alive some days is because they are able to dupe some one more of us more practical minded adults into providing services to them in exchange for money.

          1. I award you no points and may God have mercy on your soul.

    2. If there is any chance liberland can turn into D.C., I say nuke it now!

    3. Maybe the fourth castle they build there will stand.

      1. +2 tracts of land.

  7. I’ve heard that not all the women in Serbia and Croatia are drop dead gorgeous.

    Some of them are just unbelievably beautiful.

    1. That makes what Clinton did all the more unforgivable.

    2. I knew a Serbian woman. I had to work with her. She was horrendous, with an ugly face, terrible skin, and brown teeth. Not to mention she was a complete and utter bitch with mental problems.

  8. Elizabeth N Brown introduced us to this
    thing that is the canyons of letters
    and suppositions forming the winds and
    craters of a I guess my works should respect
    your works….

    If people can live for decades together why can’t
    soulful majestic mashups challenge our
    conjoinings and tiny villages
    take a tiny productive village
    and map it to other prodvillas
    and maybe we get
    a super mesh village…

    break off and supermesh villages
    get droned and outer space…

    and tech makes terrestrial drone villages drop
    sustenance and marketable receive…

    I love enb

    1. And I love YOU.

  9. First we need to decide if abortion, bakeries, and Hihn will be allowed in liberland. Also, we should draft our demands for reparations and nail them to the UN door.

    1. only gay bakeries. Problem solved.

    2. We need to make AGile supreme non-leader.

      1. A Cyborgopoly?

        1. I doubt he’ll mess with anybody.
          All we need to do, is keep him supplied.

  10. a tall pillar of lines and stars
    trimmed oil upon the waves
    of living exants and hosawana
    and the sentencs cried like that weird
    fucking 70’s shit color and all the new people
    removed those tiles abd birche ass weird
    pukey brown and orange and
    why would you fuck us up knowing
    bitches have to do this shit…
    for real am I alive?
    is this real or am I tripping?

    am i tripping in the 70 or waht the fuck is going on here, babe…
    a line of words . dude….

  11. ,y ,y

  12. tap ‘
    linkswoop
    frang
    fall
    deep…
    dtone bak
    lose vains break muscles hwtiudoa tuneladi
    under the mountain of bird and bride and sharp up
    on cliff tack clap cliff
    under fall
    realase vom
    the tone of life is
    full and appropriate
    and deep buddha from nowhere
    I feel it deep
    and i am falling into the …..

  13. I found the bruszzzzzz
    i feel the brzzzzumpy
    I will be changed by the deep fbrisizizzzzzzzzzzzzpophojohohohohohoyhhhlo

  14. my math os feel dee[ reservoir we are not used o feel

  15. the flowers on the hill
    leapt under the cloud
    falling when the lord samurai
    pulled his sword as the
    space ship passed upon
    his arm falls in the midst

  16. First it would have to start out as a fortress too tough to mess with for what little it held in the way of plunder.

    From there it would have to become an unassailable village surrounded by meters-thick, re-enforced concrete walls with it’s own artillery support, redundant, overlapping heavy machine-gun fields of fire, able to withstand siege from all sides.

    After some years it would have to work out a liveable existence with all local powers. At that time it would be best to gain recognized sovereignty – then things would really get interesting.

    When do we start?

    1. Enjoying some Iced coffee and a calzone at Dotour for lunch. They still got you on hospital food?

      1. Yup, 24/7 Washoku. A buddy stopped by a couple days ago with a care package of stuff from a local base. Quality of life shot up a bunch that day.

    2. Tejicano, just one word…thermonuclear weapons.

      1. Or just have white people. Nobody attacks them.

        1. “Or just have white people. Nobody attacks them.”

          Nobody attacks them…unless they are in Serbia or Croatia.

      2. The cost to go nuke, without sovereignty at least, would be more than it would take to build what I’ve outlined above.

        Once it gets sovereignty it can offer tax havens, cheap business licensing, untraceable bank accounts, etc.

        Also, imagine the navy it could put to sea – with leasable business/tech offices free from regulations which could anchor off the coast (any coast) in int’l waters.

        1. Maybe find that one they lost in NC. Or get spectre to steal one for you.

          Look, I’m not a detail guy, ok!

        2. And I know people will dismiss the navy idea out of hand simply because the country is land-locked and thus has no port. My answer to that is: where is the home port for the US 7th fleet?

          1. Isn’t the Danube supposed to be open to international navigation?

            1. That is correct.

              1. The kind of ship I’m considering would be too big for that. Think up-armed cruise liner. Being a naval vessel flying the Liberland flag everything that happens on board falls under the sovereignty of Liberland.

                Think unregulated corporate management, narco-tourism, tech development without government oversight – all for the price of leased office/lab space.

  17. Yo AC, what are you on? Not saying stop, just wondering for my education.

  18. And if everything you are doing can be done no matter where you live, via the wonders of the Internet, you probably don’t want to park your body in the middle of a marshy mosquito-riddled river in Croatia with no pre-existing shelter or civilized services.

    That depends. What’s Liberland’s policy on pants?

  19. Vit Jedlicka, a Czech market analyst and political activist, who has proclaimed himself (with the democratic vote of his girlfriend and a pal)

    A democratic vote? Already off to a bad start.

    1. It’s already in decline…And, it doesn’t even exist yet!

  20. That depends. What’s Liberland’s policy on pants?

    Optional, but since it is predicted that STEVE SMITH will be an early migrant, they’re probably a good idea.

  21. “Small, cramped, hard to get to and leave, mosquito-riddled, barely space to actually make anything if one wished to do business making things, difficult to find customers if one is providing a service that requires meeting people in person, lacking huge amounts of storage if your business requires owning and shipping inventory.”

    Sounds like Singapore before it took off.

    1. THIS. See also, Hong Kong. That part of Bailey’s piece was surprisingly inept.

      1. Also, see Hong Kong’s harbor, and a size about 150x that of Liberland.

    2. If differences of 100x are meaningless, then yes, as singapore is about 100x the size of Liberland. And if direct access to an ocean is meaningless, yes, though I think many mighty nations would disagree.

      1. Give that differences of 100x and 150x are clearly meaningless when building viable, economically prosperous nations, please invest in my new land, which has 142 feet of liberty-loving marsh, open for business.

        1. And it is on a creek, which eventually connects to an ocean.

  22. http://www.theguardian.com/us-…..rown-bonus

    Missouri police officer brags about spending ‘annual Michael Brown bonus’

    According to the St Louis Business Journal, just responding in the wake of Brown’s killing in August 2014 cost St Louis County a reported $4m, including “$2.5m in overtime for police work.” By January, the South County Times reported that St Louis County police had “put in 121,935 hours of work since the shooting, which amounts of $3.9m in overtime costs and $1.2m in fringes.”

    My god, imagine how expensive it would have been had they actually worked hard enough to prevent the riots and arson.

    1. Thank that officer for his service.

      They taught those uppity Ferguson residents a lesson, didn’t they?

  23. “It’s mostly a story about following a self-important man around the world meeting with small groups of supporters and dreaming dreamy dreams of sovereignty. ”

    Epi’s Story

      1. Damn. That was supposed to be a stand-alone post, not a response. To the best of my knowledge, Epi had nothing to do with the murder.

        That we know of.

      2. “Carson believed Kauffman and others were stealing valuable antiques from storage containers on his property, and he wanted to stop the thefts by sending a message, investigators said.”

        Well, he gets away with this kind of stuff at his day job, so I can understand his confusion.

  24. But 40,000 people finished the online application for citizenship in Liberland (of 330,000 who at least started, 87,000 of them Egyptians), and a picky Jedlicka, taking seriously the dictum that rather than letting the people select a new government the government must select the proper people, has provisionally approved but 130 of them as fit for Liberland.

    It would be amusing if some citizens did move to that little bog, and then staged a revolt, deposing Jedlicka as sovereign. By what right does he get to make the rules and rule over them?

    1. By what right does he get to make the rules and rule over them?

      If one accepts that Liberland was truly terra nullius, then the Labor theory of property would justify it. Of course, one could focus their attack against Locke, but that always seems strange when coming from liberty-folk.

      1. Mao Tse-Tung trumps labor theory of property. “All political power grows out of the barrel of a gun.”

        I didn’t specify that the revolutionaries had to be libertarians. That’s the big problem with Liberland, Libertopia and the rest — getting people to agree to your rules of engagement.

    2. There is in fact another libertarian group dedicated to wresting power away from Jedlicka, mentioned in one of the articles.

      But right now the bigger problem is the 2 neighboring countries blocking anyone from accessing the area.

      1. How do Libertarian groups go about “wresting power” while staying true to Libertarian principles?

        “I’m going to ignore the hell out of you!”

        “Oh, yeah? I’m going to ignore the hell out of you more!”

        “Get off my lawn!”

        “I’m not on your lawn!”

        “No, you’re not! And I’m not on yours!”

        “I’m starting a private police force!”

        “So am I!”

        “You better not agress against me!”

        “I won’t! You better not, either!”

        “No way I would! But I’m prepared!”

        “Fine!”

        “Fine!”

      2. How do Libertarian groups go about “wresting power” while staying true to Libertarian principles?

        “I’m going to ignore the hell out of you!”

        “Oh, yeah? I’m going to ignore the hell out of you more!”

        “Get off my lawn!”

        “I’m not on your lawn!”

        “No, you’re not! And I’m not on yours!”

        “I’m starting a private police force!”

        “So am I!”

        “You better not agress against me!”

        “I won’t! You better not, either!”

        “No way I would! But I’m prepared!”

        “Fine!”

        “Fine!”

  25. Perhaps the question is what would you do for your freedom for the balance of your life?

    I suppose that depends on the oppression you’ve experienced all while knowing its neither lawful, nor ethical, and certainly not moral.

    Perhaps those that believe in NAP, and ground up libertarianism, are growing impatient with the striving and waiting, knowing that all the while they are dealing with a rigged system, in a politically run, completely corrupt totalitarianist world.

    While Seasteading is far out of the reach of most individuals financial ability, moving to Liberland is not. Perhaps that’s the draw — to be free now, or as soon as possible.

  26. I bet Liberland doesn’t have ROADZZZZ

  27. Well, for one thing, they got the name wrong. It’s “Libertopia,” people!

  28. I am surprised that Bailey didn’t mention ZEDE. It won’t be full on Libertopia but it will be the most economically free place on Earth probably in history. It is probably coming soon.

  29. Seriously, If a large group of libertarians with some $$$; say 10,000 with $100K each made an offer to a nice-climate, dictator-run country to buy a gigantic area of land and have their own laws and borders, (like Hong Kong) some govt. might go along for the Billion dollar offer AND the creation of jobs for its poor peasants who could come and go into the zone.

    Of course, your $100k would buy you 1/10,000 of the land area for your own home, and rights to vote on where to place the airport, downtown park, rules and officials in charge, etc. etc.

    1. Why wouldn’t the airport and park be privately owned, and why would you get to vote on it? It’s not your property.

      1. There are some legitimate externality issues regarding noise.

      2. There are some legitimate externality issues regarding noise.

      3. There are some legitimate externality issues regarding noise.

  30. I believe the Croatians consider it a Serbian swamp. You’re clearly taking the Serbians’ side in this dispute….

  31. I guess I have to spell it out.

    Start and develop Liberland for the purpose of attaining some acerage over which you establish sovereignty in the traditional, accepted land-based model.

    Then you form a navy under that attained sovereignty for the purpose of “sea-steading”. Your naval vessels are hybrid battleships/ocean liners/leased business centers.

    Thus a large number of your citizens can spend much of their time in balmy, ocean breezes rather than dwelling in a mosquito infested swamp.

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