Police

Watch Cops Tackle a Woman Whose Son Was Just Kidnapped

Family friends help locate missing boy while local police pin down and handcuff mom.

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Screenshot/Fox News

A disturbing story out of Sacramento: Paul and Suzanne Guzman's car was stolen out of their Fairfield home's driveway—with their 8-year-old son Brock in the backseat. So the Guzmans did what most people would do and called the local police. The boy and car were eventually found, abandoned unharmed, with the help of a family friend who posted about the matter on social media. The cops, meanwhile, were busy pinning Suzanne Guzman to the ground in front of her house. 

"The cop grabbed her and and they dragged her … around the corner, where they slammed her to the ground and handcuffed her," Paul Guzman told CBS Sacramento. "As soon as they got here we felt like we were being treated like we had done something to our son."

Guzman says he doesn't believe it was the cops who helped find his son. "It wasn't the Fairfield PD that we give credit to for finding him, it was my buddy putting it on social media," he said.

Both Paul and police body-cams caught the interaction on video, which you can watch below. Paul told Fox News his wife was concerned about their dogs when officers wanted to search the house and said they should wait until he returned. 

"Then when I pulled up, there was a cop next to the door, antagonizing the dogs, and so when my wife walked over there and asked him not to antagonize the dogs, and that her husband was here, and put her hand on the screendoor to make sure the screendoor was secure because the dogs will jump up on it and it will open, they manhandled her," Paul Guzman said.

In a statement, the Fairfield Police Department said that "in order to account for every possible scenario, including Brock escaping as the vehicle" and going back inside without his parents noticing, officers requested to search the home. "Suzanne Guzman refused to consent to officers checking her home for Brock … at one point demanding we get a search warrant," it said ."Officers became so concerned they had dispatchers log the fact we were being denied entry into the home." 

The search warrant comment comes after cops repeatedly ask Guzman why she doesn't want them to search her house if her son could be hiding in there. She responds that if her son was inside, he would come running into her arms. The cops suggest maybe there is a dead body inside."Based on the growing concern for Brock, and the exigent need to check the home, officers approached the front door. As they did, one officer saw a 'reddish substance smeared in the carpet' that at first look appeared to be blood," the statement continues. 

Suzanne Guzman got up and pushed past officers toward the front door attempting to enter the residence. Suzanne Guzman refused to move away from the door and struggled with officers as they attempted to move her away from the door. After a short struggle, she was detained in handcuffs. Paul Guzman was also later detained in handcuffs for trying to interfere with officers searching the home.

Both parents were later released with no charges.

"The safety of Brock Guzman was of the utmost concern to us," the police statement concluded. "It was the actions of the family during the investigation that caused us concern and ultimately led to their arrest."

Here's police body-cam video of the altercation: 

And the video from Paul's phone:

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  1. Guzman says he doesn’t believe it was the cops who helped find his son. “It wasn’t the Fairfield PD that we give credit to for finding him, it was my buddy putting it on social media,” he said.

    Unfortunately, I think Guzman is about to find out the hard way what the cops’ real proficiency is: fucking with people who make them look bad.

    1. No, they already found out what the cops actual proficiency is: finding the easiest people in any crime to fuck with and try and pin it on them for a quick and lazy case closed.

      Fucking with people that make them look bad comes later.

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      Tom Clancy

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  2. “Suzanne Guzman refused to consent to officers checking her home for Brock … at one point demanding we get a search warrant,” it said .”Officers became so concerned …”

    about the peasant getting uppity and asserting her supposed constitutional rights that they immediately took her down, so that she would always understand:

    You WILL Respect My Authoritah!

    1. As great as it is to see more and more people understand and assert their rights, what is happening is the cops are learning how to use every single loophole the supreme court has given them.

      You say – “No you may not search my house without a warrant”
      The police respond – “You blinked, there is “exigent cause” to search your house”

      You say – “I have a right to film you”
      The police respond – “You are making me “feel unsafe”, I am going to shoot you now”

      Rights are functionally useless if the police have these “escape” words they can just say that make your rights disappear.

      1. You say – “No you may not search my house without a warrant”
        The police respond – “You blinked, there is “exigent cause” to search your house”
        But the fact is… they didn’t enter without a warrant, did they?

        You say – “I have a right to film you”
        The police respond – “You are making me “feel unsafe”, I am going to shoot you now”
        But I am not aware of a single time someone has been shot while video taping.

        Rights are functionally useless if the police have these “escape” words they can just say that make your rights disappear.
        The only “right” this woman was denied was the right to go back into her home, which was potentially a crime scene. She clearly didn’t want the cops in there. How were they to know if she was going to make one last check for evidence of his killing?

  3. “Officers became so concerned they had dispatchers log the fact we were being denied entry into the home.”

    Uh-huh. Real selfless heroes here.

    1. Maliciously incompetent overpaid heavily armed baboons with qualified immunity backed by politically powerful government labor unions.

      What could go wrong?

  4. The man was smart enough to know the cops would have shot his dogs if he allowed them inside. Maybe he’s one of us.

    Today’s been a very nut punchy day, Reason. I still think you should’ve given out athletic cups as donation rewards.

  5. “The safety of Brock Guzman was of the utmost concern to us,”

    Oh, look, another variant of “for the children”. That simple phrase is like the goto excuse for anything a statist/pig/politician/special interest group wants to do.

    Also, it’s incredible that we’re reaching a point where even calling the cops for the ostensible stuff you still might want to call them about is becoming very dangerous. Think your kid’s been kidnapped? They arrest you. Hostage situation and some hostage runs to safety? The cops shoot them because they’re just baboons with guns and can’t even be expected to have the discretion to, you know, not shoot the people they are there to protect.

    We shot right past “don’t ever call the cops unless it’s really really serious” to “calling the cops for anything could result in you or a loved one being arrested, beaten, or killed depending on the cops involved and their mood that day, even though it was you who called for their help”.

    Yay, what a great place to be!

    1. what’s funny is that in every country i’ve visited except for england and the US? police are basically bums.

      by which i mean, they really don’t lift a finger unless they absolutely have to. they’re utterly disinterested in getting involved. They’d much prefer to do their jobs with a notepad and a walkie talkie than actually have to get into a physical altercation or ‘escalate things’. I’ve seen police in europe *wait for a fistfight to end* before arresting people. Why get punched?

      Whereas in the US? they shoot your dogs, shoot people at traffic stops, smash people’s cell phones for filming the wrong thing, and beat the shit out of anyone who asks too many questions.

      land of the free indeed.

      1. Well, US police forces have been actively recruiting people 1) with low IQs and 2) who will fit right in with their gang mentality for years and years now to fill ranks in order to show more policemen getting hired in order to be “tough on crime”. The incentives are all terrible, and this is the unsurprising result. Goons who view anyone outside the gang as an annoyance or a collar at best and as a mortal threat at worst.

        Is there anything the drug war can’t make terrible?

      2. When I was living in Bangkok, the last condo I lived in was adjacent to the major army base in the city. There was a supermarket about a 10 minute walk from me if you cut across the base. My friend, who lived in the same complex and was formerly a cop colonial officer in Hong Kong before it was returned to China taught me the “colonial bluff”. See, all we had to do was make sure we were wearing at least a sport coat or blazer and walk past the entrance without even acknowledging the guard. We had to be conversing animatedly with one another about something that seemed important. The guards never stopped us; they didn’t want to deal with the hassle of interacting with foreigners who probably didn’t speak Thai and/or were probably important. Plus it was usually like 3 pm and the sun was still beating down, so why leave the shade of the guard station?

        I doubt it would work now, being the post-coup days.

        1. ^This

          The same general rule often applies to ‘how to deal with authority’ in the US. Often, the safest thing to do is ignore it and just smile and nod at something over their shoulder, and just keep walking

          some people are really bad at this. they can’t help but look the dog in the eyes.

          1. Photographers know this trick, too: Smile, nod, walk around like you own the place.

      3. This can’t be posted enough. They think this shows how cops are doing a thankless job and that showing them beating the hell out of people will get us to like them.

        1. Is “This” supposed to be a link?

            1. This is my favorite cop fellator bit that shows up on derpbook everytime the brutality issue bubbles over…which seems to a lot lately. As if I’m supposed to swayed by “unsubstantiated” complaints or the fact that more people are raped than are victims of cop brutality. A nice attempt at misdirection from the actual trends of brutality, but overall I give it a freshman stats grade of B-
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRd5oucG114

      4. I lived in Germany and found the Polizei to be anything but bums. They were invariably courteous, professional, and even helpful whenever I interacted with them.

        I also believe they – collectively – fired less shots in calendar year 2013 in the entire Federal Republic of Germany than a gang of thug police in Cleveland did during about a minute of riddling a car and two people with bullets that year.

  6. Is this serving or protecting?

    1. Serving, severing, what difference…?

  7. So these “professionals” have never dealt with a hysterical mother before? Wow.

    And yeah, the Guzman’s should expect retaliation.

    1. I expect that the Guzmans will lawyer up really soon.

  8. I just realized one of their kids in the picture is wearing a Marshawn Lynch jersey. I guess they’re not Niners fans.

    GOOD.

    1. ‘Biscuits and gravy!’

  9. Wait, they needed a warrant to enter the house, but they still get to arrest the mother for blocking a warrantless entry?

    1. If they can arrest people for resisting arrest that seems like small potatoes really.

  10. If you want violence you call the police, if you want help, you call your family and friends. All cops know is force, anything else is beyond their limited mental capacity.

    1. I used to think that you people were being a tad hyperbolic with that kind of talk. i apologize for doubting you, there truly isn’t a situation that one can’t make worse by calling the cops.

      1. When I called the police to file a report for my insurance for a break in in my car they wanted to search my house. When I kept refusing they lost interest in the break in to my car. They tried multiple times including vague threats that I was trying to commit insurance fraud. I think it’s sarcasmic who has a similar story.

        I had a friend who joined the local police force where I was living. He went through the training and quit about 2 months after graduating from the academy. He never would say why but every time he saw a cop he would turn his back or walk away.

    2. Only call the cops if you’re willing to exchange your freedom, such as it is, for their assistance, such as it is.

  11. Tell me again why police are necessary?

      1. The make good umpires?

        1. That’s the coolest thing I’ve seen Japanese people do in the city streets since that video of a historical reenactment of the Boshin War, which I can’t find.

          So this will have to do.

          1. That seems to be the summer festival music. I’ve only joined the dancing once or twice when lit with the father-in-law. That music is mesmerizing.

  12. What am I hearing in the background? More autoplay? What the fuck, people?

    1. The autoplay of the stream on the main page earlier was a little shocking. To find another autoplay video is just laughable. Are they trying to drive people away?

  13. Why is the body cam so shitty? His cell phone is perfectly clear, but it looks like midnight from the cops.

    Also, the local news report said that both parents were cuffed and transported to the station. WTF?!

  14. The lesson here is if your kid is kidnapped, put it out on social media. Don’t call 911.

  15. NEVER call the po-po…no matter what happens, no matter who gets hurt…the po-po will blow your head off.

    1. Why 2 pos in po-po? Poor police? Pope police? Poppa police?

      1. I first heard the term in a country music song….do not know the origin.

        Most of the time they get called “five-oh” around here.

  16. I’m going to partially defend the cops here with the caveat of not having the full body cam footage. If your kid is missing, and they the mother is hysterically yelling at you about not going into the house, it does raise some red flags. Then you open the door and see red stuff all over the carpet…

    If you are going to call them for something like this, let them do their jobs or at least try to rationally explain yourself. She felt like they were suspicious of her. Maybe she reacted to the request to go inside the house the wrong way and got confrontational.

    I’m always bothered by the tackling of women to ‘defend’ themselves, though.

    1. It’s as in Scream: Everyone’s a suspect!

    2. Finally, someone who sounds reasonable. The woman herself sounds slightly nuts; which I am willing to excuse to some degree by apparently she’s terrified and hysterical – aren’t cops supposed to be given some kind of training in handling that situation? It does seem likely that if she had just let them in they would have just looked around for the kid and then he
      aded out — unless of course there was stuff she did not want them to see (given the mum’s behavior, I really am tempted to think the kid took off in the car to get away from her).

      1. Yes. They are trained to wrestle her to the ground and cuff her. Amazing that they didn’t bounce her head off the pavement, peeper spray or taze her for being so uppity.

  17. The rage. The. Rage.

    I guess I’m prepared to watch the finale of Vikings now that my blood is up.

  18. so what ever happened to the cop who shot that kid in Cincinnati?

    1. Most likely, nothing.

  19. C’mon Reason….Are you serious with this one. Police ask to search the house because there have been numerous times children have been found @ home. This is a BS story. You’ve got great articles and then you have Rolling Stone articles. This is a RS article. Give me a break. There also seems to be in inordinate amount of fucktards posting this evening as well. Every time we try and sell libertarianism as the party of thinking people, we get idiots like this posting. Such idiots do not help the party.

    1. The Fairfield mother had called the same police officers to her home after her car was stolen from her driveway with her 8-year-old son, Broc in the back seat.

      The child was in the car when it was stolen.

      He (Guzman) says Fairfield Police officers insisted on first searching their home, something he says Suzanne stopped them from doing until Paul (Guzman) returned to corral their dogs.

      “We have two dogs and one of them would bite somebody that they didn’t know coming into the house,” he said.

      I’m guessing she didn’t want the cops to get bit and then shoot her dogs when she knew her kid was in the car when it was stolen.

    2. We understand the children are sometimes, even often, found hiding at home. Of course in this case the car’s being missing rather mitigated that as a possibility. Regardless, if the distraught people don’t want you in the house, how does that give you the right to go in & drag her out? If they want to say, sorry, then we can’t search for your child, well OK, then, they’re “even”.

    3. CopAndLibertarian

      Please register with then share comments from PoliceOne. A few months ago the admins blocked even viewing comments to all non-LEOs. Thanks in advance.

  20. Note to the Chief of Police : Take Mr. “Hook her up” and fire him and revoke his certification. Note to the Mayor, Just write a check for $50K and hope they accept it.

  21. OK, you’ve got a missing child, a hysterical mother who doesn’t want you in the house, and you think you might see blood inside.

    So, naturally, you…go in without waiting for a warrant, right? Am I missing something?

    1. No, you sprinkle a little crack on the floor after you shoot the dogs.

      Then you get a warrant.

      1. Seriously, does the article mention them going in right after thinking they saw the blood?

        1. I’d say there’s a bunch missing from this story, like I wouldn’t be surprised if the kid took the car joy riding – the dad did say they left it running in the driveway- and it was mysteriously found two miles away, and the blood on the floor seems weird. But tackling a woman who can’t find her son seems like it was handled………poorly.

    2. No, you ask for permission to go in, and when it’s denied, you log it (like they did) because that’s the first sliver of evidence that there’s a dead kid inside.

      No judge in the world will turn down a warrant based on “the kid is mission and the parents are uncooperative so we want to search the house.

      Lots of parents kill their kids. Lots.

  22. I can certainly understand the police officer’s desire to search the house. There have been instances where kids reported missing were safe at home (anyone remember the balloon boy?) and of course there is the possibility that the kidnapping claim was bogus and the parents were trying to cover up something happening to the kid.

    But… they know they are dealing with someone who is likely hysterical (her kid is missing after all), they could probably have done a better job in calming her down and working with her. I mean asking her if she is concerned with the welfare of her child? What is that going to do other than make her angry. These are supposed to be trained police officers. Does their training not include how to deal with a potential victim’s loved ones without antagonizing them?

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  24. The last thing I would expect would be that I would have secure my five dogs at a moment’s notice when they’re supposed to be finding my kid. But “get a search warrant”? I think I would have stuck with ‘just wait for my husband so our dogs don’t get killed.’

    The cops need to be updated on public perception. Every new meme of cop behavior, whether fair or not, plays into the public consciousness, and should be updated daily for their edification.

    They really need to rescind low-average-IQ-only hiring policies.

    1. I think the mom’s hysteria and seeming unreasonableness has to do with not just *her son having just been kidnapped* but the cop’s attitudes. If you watch the whole video, she starts out simply minorly defensive about why they need to search her house when she knows her son isn’t in there and saying that they have to wait for her husband to get back and deal with the dogs. It’s only after they keep pestering her over and over again about what she’s hiding and suggesting she doesn’t care about her son and saying they can search her house without her permission anyway or come back with a search warrant that she starts telling them, “fine, get a search warrant!” I mean, I don’t think Ms. Guzman handles things perfectly, but then it’s like… how would you be if you just saw someone drive off with your child in your car, called the police, and then they keep insisting that before looking for your kid they need to search your house?

  25. So, what I see on this video is that this is apparently taking place in the dark (street lamps are on), and the cops are very calm despite the mom flipping the fuck out whenever they mention going in the house, while being oddly calm at other times. Maybe she’s worried about the dogs, maybe she’s worried about something else. I can’t blame the cops for entertaining the idea that maybe the son is inside, either hiding or dead.

    Then they think they see blood on the floor inside–and it’s dark, so I can buy spilled nail polish, but how do they know? Only then do they “hook her up”.

    I’m not really seeing the horrible police misconduct here, as opposed to, say, the cop in TX who smashed a drunk lady into the pavement for no particular reason, or the prosecutor in MI sending SWAT teams after teh evil ‘baggers

    1. I’m not really seeing the horrible police misconduct here, as opposed to, say, the cop in TX who smashed a drunk lady into the pavement for no particular reason, or the prosecutor in MI sending SWAT teams after teh evil ‘baggers

      I think prioritizing a woman who is, at most, disturbing the peace (and pretty directly because of the police presence) over a GTA and potential kidnapping is pretty shoddy prioritization.

      I think bringing more officers to a scene where the police presence is causing problems shows a distinct case of officers escalating the issue rather than resolving it.

      A squad car out front and two officers at the premises stops her from burying any dead bodies that may be tucked away in the house and establishes the appropriate ‘rally point’ for Dad, kid, and other relevant parties.

      Plenty of bad decisions, but (and somewhat sadly) she got out of the situation with her face intact so I don’t see any specific misconduct. Just poor execution and/or poor policy.

      1. We don’t know how many other officers are out looking for the kid, and the officers on scene have no idea who/what is in the house. Sure they can hang around outside, but that dude from that one episode of SOA could be inside as they speak, cutting up the body and washing it down the drain.

        Look, her behavior is weird. She goes apeshit when the cops say they want to go inside, but is calm and cooperative any other moment. Maybe she’s acting weird from stress, but maybe the stress is that she’s hoping she can keep them from finding her son dead ten feet away in the livingroom. It happens. They need to pursue all lines of investigation. And it’s a little unfair to chalk up the fact that they didn’t beat her up to them being too lazy or dumb to manage it, rather than them being professional enough to rule her out as a suspect without killing her in the process.

      2. No, she was cuffed for trying to access a potential crime scene. The police have every right to prevent people from entering a potential crime scene even if it’s their own home.

  26. Sorry, I blame the parents as well as the cops. While mom was being mulish, goodness knows what the kid might have been doing, perhaps drowning in a creek. Have the cops in, check the house, and be done with it.

    1. Yeah, sure, fuck your Constitutional rights. You know the child isn’t in the house, but you have to put up with the cops treating you like a perp and either agree to a warrantless search or get a cop beatdown. That is reason alone to refuse entry.

      Simply exercising your Constitutional rights is reason enough. You have a right to make them get a warrant. I’ve done it myself (They were bluffing. They never got the warrant. They had no cause to enter my house or search my property.)

      If you don’t like living in a police state and have no rights, you have to act like you have rights and don’t live in a police state.

      1. Constitutional rights, or expediting the search for my missing son? Hm……constitutional rights, or expediting the search for my missing son? You always have to weigh everything. In an emergency situation, I’d let them look in the freaking house if it meant they could then move on to looking for my son.

        As to the situation itself, as many above have said this doesn’t look like the greatest poster case for “jackbooted thugs.” Seems like the cops had good reason to want to look in the house on this one. As long as they had more than one cop on the case so the department was multitasking (looking for the car at the same time as looking in the house) I don’t see the problem with a house search. I do think tackling mom is overboard, as cops usually go.

        1. The only people keeping the cops from moving on to look for her son was the police — essentially trying to blackmail her and intimidate her into giving up her constitutional rights.

          And, since, as they mentioned, they already had people out looking for the boy, the intimdation wasn’t particularly compelling. I don’t let police into my house for any reason without a warrant. It’s just an invitation for them to go fishing. I don’t have drugs or anything illegal in my house that I know of, but as has been written in “Five Felonies a Day,” if the police decide they want to find something to arrest you for, they will. We shouldn’t, as a people, acquiesce to that. We have to take stands at every opportunity.

          They did’t have “good reason.” They saw a bit of red on the floor. Nail polish — which they hadn’t seen when they were initially trying to intimidate her into letting them search. They didn’t have probable cause. The parents themselves were the ones who had called the police. You think they would have done that if they had their dead kid’s body in their house? Ridiculous. They were trying to invent justifications to invade the family’s privacy.

          Nobody should have to put up with that.

          1. ^This. I don’t trust the police at all and the proliferation of police brutality we’re seeing and their tendency to create any type of probable cause to enact a search would cause me to do the same. After all, who knows what they’ll find and to try to charge with. No one should feel compelled to give up their constitutional rights, especially with a bunch of bullying cops.

          2. Because no one has ever murdered their own kid then falsely reported a kidnapping, right?

    2. While mom was being mulish, goodness knows what the kid might have been doing, perhaps drowning in a creek.

      Wow! Actual victim blaming.

      I can’t fault the mom for being hysterical. And I can’t fault the father for, after potentially having lost his son, getting irrational about them then taking his wife too.

      This is, pretty directly symptomatic of a general policy of escalating policy into crimes, which is not what officers *should* be paid to do, but is repeatedly proven to be general habit of theirs.

      As I said above, it would’ve been just as easy for one or two officers to ‘voluntarily detain’ her on her doorstep while they looked for the kid and/or obtained a warrant. Instead, they pressed indoors under mistaken assumptions, false pretenses, or whatever other euphemism you want to use for bad and/or stupid reasons.

    3. They probably had some pot sitting out or something stupid like that (or just didn’t want their dogs shot). If they let the cops in, they all go to jail and then the kid comes home to … child protective services…

    4. What are you blaming the parents for, exactly?

      She wouldn’t allow the cops in the house right at that moment, apparently in part because she expected that they’d shoot their dogs. She just wanted them to wait for her husband to get home.

      If the cops wanted entry into the house, all they had to do was wait until her husband arrived. Don’t you think that would have been faster, more effective, and more professional approach than this ridiculous scenario?

  27. Police officers are vocational sociopaths.

    A sociopath is someone who displays a “disposition to violate social norms of behavior” through “deceitfulness ? impulsivity ? irritability and aggressiveness ? [a] reckless disregard for safety of self or others,” and a “lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.”

  28. Her dogs would have been DEAD if she had let them enter her house.
    ofdogsandmen.net

  29. Google pay 97$ per hour my last pay check was $8500 working 1o hours a week online. My younger brother friend has been averaging 12k for months now and he works about 22 hours a week. I cant believe how easy it was once I tried it out.
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  30. does nobody here find it at all suspicious that the parents wouldn’t allow the police to search the house. there have been many cases of kids either hiding in the house or dead in the house. the cops may sometimes be assholes but for what wasn’t reported here was that the cops saw blood on the floor through the window. this was reported on the local radio station. Again know the facts before judging.

    1. the cops may sometimes be assholes but for what wasn’t reported here was that the cops saw blood on the floor through the window. this was reported on the local radio station. Again know the facts before judging.

      I don’t know the facts, but you must be a cop or fellate one regularly. Better? Or should I make fewer presumptions about your sexuality with regard to officers, and judge you illitererate and blind? Because the article pretty clearly covers the “blood” “witnessed”‘ by the cops and the statements about the *nail polish* are there on the video.

      Maybe I should judge, maybe with some absurd notion like the presumption of innocence. So that I don’t look like an imbecile who can’t tell the difference between blood and nail polish, maternal homicide and a carjacking, or someone too busy to read and pay attention vs. someone who just loves it when officers fuck them in the ass.

      1. Because no one who beat their kid to death would ever say, “that’s not blood it’s nail polish.”

        Did you fellate a lot of inmates when you were locked up?

      2. you don’t know the facts while I stated what was stated by the local police you fool. Just because some one disagrees with your opinion does not make them a fellater to an imaginary cause.
        You are commenting to a person who has been tackled by a group of under cover cops, cops who did not tell me they were undercover which almost proved fatal, lucky for all of us a uniformed officer showed up in time to tell them they had the wrong man. so there is no love or hate here asswipe just honesty to the situation.

    2. I don’t think it’s absurd at all. I have turned police away at my doorstep and told them to go get a warrant. It’s what a free man does.

      The burden is not on me to prove I have nothing to hide. The burden is on them to prove they’ve got a good reason to force themselves inside my home.

      The “blood” was mentioned on the video and in the article. It wasn’t blood. It was nail polish. Since we know the outcome and we know the kid wasn’t lying dead in the house (a ridiculous proposition at the time). A red stain on the floor is not probably cause for a warrantless search in absence of any other evidence or claim that violence has occurred in the house.

      The parents called the cops themselves (bet they’ll never make that mistake again). The idea that they would call the cops to come over while they had their child’s dead body lying in their house is ridiculous. It was a paper-thin pretext to go snooping around their home.

      1. Why was it a ridiculous proposition?
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D…..ee_Anthony

        http://www.valleymorningstar.c…..6e741.html

        Had that child been found dead in the house, every cop-hater hear would be saying “those idiots didn’t demand to go in the house? That’s the first place you look.”

        I’m sure as hell glad none of you will answer my 911 call. (And, yes, I am fully prepared to protect myself too).

  31. Any lawyers care to give over/under or expected outcomes on a video recording of an explicitly unwarranted search?

    The traditional wisdom is ‘deny, deny, deny’ but that was predicated on the notion that they would just find *something* and arrest you. Seems to me, this woman followed the script to a ‘T’ and ended up in cuffs anyway.

    Ultimately, whether there’s a warrant, the police wrongly cuff me and kick in the door, or I let them in, it’s in the judge’s hands. I almost wonder if the explicit statement/agreement, on camera, that there is no warrant and that the intent of the search is to find the kid would be worth more (to my lawyer or a judge) than a screaming, yelling, outright refusal.

    At the very least, it might be an approach to open up an avenue whereby citizens/lawyer can rather expectantly rely on the police to a) be capturing video and b) the video be handled and used as evidence. There’s no point in having video if the only people who can hold/release/view/judge/use it are the department and IA.

    1. She wasn’t cuffed and detained because she wouldn’t allow them in, she was detained to prevent contamination of a potential crime scene. Very legal, and very logical (Unless you believe cops do know right, which is most of the Reason readership, it seems).

    2. She wasn’t cuffed and detained because she wouldn’t allow them in, she was detained to prevent contamination of a potential crime scene. Very legal, and very logical (Unless you believe cops do know right, which is most of the Reason readership, it seems).

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  33. Pretty pathetic that her privacy was more important than helping the police find her kid. I’m all for freedom and warrants, but seconds counted and she was more interested in protecting her homestead than her child.

    Instead, she acted like she had something to hide, which is a pretty stupid thing to do to cops who are investigating a kidnapping.

    Because, you know, no one ever lies about their kid missing because they killed her…
    http://www.latimes.com/local/c…..story.html

  34. Google pay 97$ per hour my last pay check was $8500 working 1o hours a week online. My younger brother friend has been averaging 12k for months now and he works about 22 hours a week. I cant believe how easy it was once I tried it out.
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  35. Google pay 97$ per hour my last pay check was $8500 working 1o hours a week online. My younger brother friend has been averaging 12k for months now and he works about 22 hours a week. I cant believe how easy it was once I tried it out.
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  36. pay 97$ per hour my last pay check was $8500 working 1o hours a week online. My younger brother friend has been averaging 12k for months now and he works about 22 hours a week. I cant believe how easy it was once I tried it out.
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  37. my Aunty Sophia just got a nearly new BMW X4 SUV just by some parttime working online with a lap-top
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