Police Abuse

More Come Forward to Accuse North Charleston Police and Michael Slager of Abuse

Lawsuit over use of Taser on arrested, submissive man.

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"Stop resisting! It makes it harder to Taze you!"
Dashcam

Another resident of North Charleston, South Carolina, is accusing Officer Michael Slager of abusive police behavior. This one survived, unlike Walter Scott, and is suing Slager, the city, and the police department over an incident captured on police dashcam that appears to show Slager using a Taser on a man while the man is face-down on the pavement after being arrested.

It may be the least of Slager's worries, given that he's been charged with murder for Scott's death, also caught on video. But Julius Wilson claims he was Tased by police after they had stopped him over a broken taillight and arrested him, yanking him out of his car because he kept demanding they explain why they were arresting him. Then once they had him submissive on the street, Slager used his Taser on him.

The Guardian has the dashcam video and the lawsuit posted here. The alleged stunning is not actually visible on the video (the back of an officer blocks much of the view of Wilson). Wilson can be heard reacting to the pain at 2:50 in the video. Slager is on the other side of Wilson, almost completely concealed from the dash cam. There's a lot of talking at once and it's not clear what everybody is saying. According to the lawsuit, Wilson was charged with driving with a suspended South Carolina license, but Wilson had a valid Georgia's driver's license.

In other news related to Slager's behavior, the videotaped shooting of Scott has prompted former New York Police Department Commissioner Ray Kelly to come around on body cameras. He was previously a skeptic, but on This Week on NBC, he said he has come around:

We have to assume that this officer would not act the way he did if in fact he had a body camera that was recording. I think it is a game-changer. What you'll see is a movement now by many more police departments to go to cameras. There are issues with it, there are problems with it, but this trumps all those issues.

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167 responses to “More Come Forward to Accuse North Charleston Police and Michael Slager of Abuse

  1. There are issues with it, there are problems with it, but this trumps all those issues.

    Duh

    1. http://www.slate.com/blogs/the…..shire.html

      Off topic, but Chris Christie declares his intent to run as a Democrat.

      New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will give a speech in New Hampshire on Tuesday that proposes raising the Social Security retirement age, limiting benefits for those who make more than $80,000 a year in other income, and eliminating benefits entirely to those who make more than $200,000.

      1. “What a shocking idea, you could never tell from his politics,” said absolutely no one.

        1. More From Slate: Google Maps Says Edward Snowden is in the White House.

      2. Christie is also scheduled to “mingle with voters at a Manchester pizzeria” during his visit to New Hampshire

        The most important question is would that Pizzeria be willing to cater a gay wedding, or does Chris Christie hate gays?

        1. He don’t like no gay marriage.

          So I guess he’ll have to run as a Republocrat.

        2. Even more important. Will they have enough food on hand to serve anyone after Christie is finished mingling?

    2. I’ve made $64,000 so far this year working online and I’m a full time student. I’m using an online business opportunity I heard about and I’ve made such great money. It’s really user friendly and I’m just so happy that I found out about it. Heres what I’ve been doing
      http://www.work-mill.com

    3. I’ve made $64,000 so far this year working online and I’m a full time student. I’m using an online business opportunity I heard about and I’ve made such great money. It’s really user friendly and I’m just so happy that I found out about it. Heres what I’ve been doing
      http://www.work-mill.com

  2. Speaking of cop cams, David Brooks can always be counted on for abject idiocy.

    Cop-cams chip away at that. The cameras will undermine communal bonds. Putting a camera on someone is a sign that you don’t trust him, or he doesn’t trust you. When a police officer is wearing a camera, the contact between an officer and a civilian is less likely to be like intimate friendship and more likely to be oppositional and transactional. Putting a camera on an officer means she is less likely to cut you some slack, less likely to not write that ticket, or to bend the regulations a little as a sign of mutual care.

    WAH! IF COPS HAVE TO WEAR CAMERAS THEY WON’T BE ABLE TO LET THEIR FRIENDS GET AWAY WITH STUFF!

    1. When a police officer is wearing a camera, the contact between an officer and a civilian is less likely to be like intimate friendship and more likely to be oppositional and transactional.

      In other words it WILL MORE CLOSELY MODEL REALITY!!!!!!!!

      When a cop is pretending to be your friend, it’s not because they are feeling friendly. It’s called lulling someone into a false sense of security.

      1. Exactly. Their job is to use deception and authority to get you to admit to things, even if you didn’t do them. We’re hardwired as a species to defer to people in uniforms. That’s just the way it is. It takes effort to fight it. And police know this. They take advantage of it by using vocal inflection when asking a question to make it clear what the right answer is. If you’re not paying attention you’ll fall for the ruse, admitting to something you didn’t do just because you reflexively respond “Yes” because the vocal inflection combined with intimidation makes it clearly the answer the cop wants to hear.

        1. We’re hardwired as a species to defer to people in uniforms.

          It’s not hardwiring, it is pure social conditioning.

          1. We are hardwired to respond to women in pasties. But uniforms are a matter of social conditioning as the finger says.

            1. Uniforms are a signal of someone belonging to, basically, a gang; it merely symbolizes that someone is involved in an organization and that gives them some power. They have “friends” to back them up. It has also come to mean, in our modern world, authority, because the only people who wear uniforms tend to be the military and the police.

              1. And strippers. Don’t forget strippers.

          2. I don’t necessarily agree.

            1. What difference….

          3. And I don’t think it is the uniforms so much as whatever signs that they have that kind of power: uniforms, blue lights, that fucking pig attitude. I don’t feel the same around boy scouts or soldiers in uniform as I do around police. And that’s because I know the police are a threat to me and the others most likely aren’t.

            I suppose that for people more accepting of authority than I am it might be different. A lot of people do seem to actually believe that people in uniform deserve respect and deference.

    2. Ah, David Brooks, the “conservative”half of NPR’s itinerant liberal minstrels.

      1. I used to read Brooks, but I had to stop. He was (and apparently, still is) always going on about these ambiguous concepts such as “communal bonds” and “respect for institutions,” and he’s always tut-tutting that they’re fraying. I swore off him when he blasted Edward Snowden as “unmediated,” which I gather meant “showed insufficient deference to authority/exhibited unhealthy levels of independent thought.” He actually blamed Snowden for undermining people’s trust in the federal government.

    3. Putting a camera on an officer means she is less likely to cut you some slack, less likely to not write that ticket, or

      less likely to tase you while facedown and handcuffed, less likely to kill you.

      1. I suppose I could live with that set of compromises.

    4. Well, I don’t fucking trust cops. So that takes care of that.

      While it is nice not to get a ticket every time you get stopped speeding, I’d prefer they just enforce laws more evenly rather than giving you a pass if they think you are a good guy.

      I heard an interview with Brooks on NPR last night. And while he always comes off as a giant ass, he displayed a surprising self awareness about what giant, smug, asses people with his job tend to come off as.

    5. “[…]Putting a camera on someone is a sign that you don’t trust him,[…]”

      Hmm, I think he may be onto something here!

    6. Lawyers and MADD have contributed a ton to the disappearance of officer discretion.

      No cop dares let someone off with just a warning if they have even a whiff of alcohol on their breath. They know that if they let them go and something bad happens they are in big trouble.

      1. The worry over getting sued is a significant basis behind so many “zero tolerance” policies, whether it’s “never let a possibly slightly drunk person just drive home” or “punish kid who brought a pocket knife to school accidentally”. It’s a combination of freeing bureaucrats and other functionaries from having to think, and the worry that if you ever don’t follow “policies” exactly, you and your organization will be sued into oblivion. The incentives, of course, become completely perverted; normal human “common sense” and interaction is subverted into a robotic, unthinking, zero empathy reaction.

        1. Zero Tolerance is one aspect of Institutionalized Stupidity — no public employee may exercise discretion in the interpretation of the various books of rules that govern the masses.

      2. the problem is that they have set the threshold for DUI so ridiculously low that even people who aren’t the least bit impaired are hauled in. Likewise, the actual number of cases involving bodily or property damage is a tiny fraction of the total DUI cases so, public safety isn’t the primary motivation any more. It is revenue and political.
        The same is true for most traffic offenses. Few actually involve an a accident so few are a matter of public safety.
        It is nitpicky stupid traffic tickets that are used almost exclusively for revenue that kills any good will between cops and the public.
        This is partially the problem of the cops and mostly the problem of adminstrators and politicians who prioritize police a manner that is both adversarial and parasitic to the public. Until this changes we have little reason to trust the police.

    7. Putting a camera on someone is a sign that you don’t trust him, or he doesn’t trust you.

      This is what is known as “recognizing reality, rather than living in a fantasy world”.

      1. agreed – we have put a tremendous amount of trust and power in the police and they have been abusing that trust.
        The whole law enforcement system needs overhauling because it is barely functional.

        For one thing, it needs to focus on public safety and property protection not on enforcing codes designed to raise revenue for the government. When the police shifted its role in such manner is when the citizenry lost confidence in the police and it became an adversarial role between the police and the public.

        1. Yessss!!! ^^^This. They’re just another armed gang, collecting money for the gubmint.

    8. When a police officer is wearing a camera, the contact between an officer and a civilian is less likely to be like intimate friendship

      Does anyone else interpret this to mean that David Brooks has traded many a BJ in exchange for not getting a ticket?

      1. There is no other possible interpretation.

    9. The camera should be hidden in a cuddly stuffed teddy bear that the police officer carries around thus maintaining the visage of caring and friendship.

    10. Nothing demonstrates intimacy like a broken broomstick up the poop chute.

  3. When Ray Kelly is getting on board, you know it’s bad…

    1. His previous decades of pretending this shit doesn’t happen – well, that’s just water under the bridge.

    2. It’s refreshing to see someone admit that the people he supervises are like a roving war-band of chimpanzees if not watched 24-7.

  4. So this is becoming the Bill Cosby of police scandals?

    1. Someone been handing out puddin’ pops?

      1. Full of rape drugs.

    2. Leonard Part 6

  5. Looks like the tide is shifting. Wonder if it will last?

    I am generally a short term pessimist and long term optimist. I always figured cops would suck up the corruption so much that it would eventually backfire on them, and maybe it finally is.

    I look forward to being able to look back on these days as when the tide finally turned.

    Whether it will eventually turn back, I do not know. Analogies are not always perfect 🙂

    1. plates shift; tides turn.

      1. Quibblers kevetch.

    2. After watching COPS the other night, I don’t think anything will change. Not as far as police practices go. We’ll just become desensitized to police abuse.

      1. I have also seen quite a few attempts at justification and excuses for the cop on derpbook, so I don’t think the tide is turning quite yet.

      2. I think you may be right. But I try to be optimistic sometimes.

        Even if people do sometimes get worked up about a particularly egregious case like this, they will typically still assume that most of the violence cops do is somehow justified. And constantly focusing on the race aspect (which I think is relevant, but far from the main problem) shifts focus away from solutions that might actually make some difference.

        1. Focusing on the race issue is also a way to separate themselves from the reality of “there outa be a law” If the problem is racism one does not need to examine their support for ever increasing government power, revenue generation, moral busibodism, etc. If it’s racism it’s just evil people, rather than a structural issue that leads to these events. They can claim it’s a bad apple, rather than a rancid recipe.

          1. If it’s racism it’s just evil people, rather than a structural issue that leads to these events. They can claim it’s a bad apple, rather than a rancid recipe.

            Exactly.

          2. Yeah, that is the real issue.

            I have no doubt that there is some general bias in policing that causes them to scrutinize blacks, especially young black males, and certain other minorities more than similarly situated white people.
            But the real problem, as you say, is that when people say “there oughta be a law”, they don’t consider that laws don’t just work by magic. You have to go out there and do real violence to real people if you want to stop people selling drugs or loose cigarettes or patronizing whores or betting on football or whatever.

      3. What possible reason could you have for watching COPS?

    3. They’re wearing cameras, but I imagine the next fight will involve getting them to turn the things on. I’m encouraged that Albuquerque fired an officer over failing to use his lapel cam, but that was after years of abuses and an excoriating DOJ investigation.

      1. Has he been quietly reinstated after arbitration?

        1. Not yet. It’s being litigated, but I think he’ll be the sacrificial goat to placate outrage.

      2. “I’m encouraged that Albuquerque fired an officer over failing to use his lapel cam, but that was after years of abuses and an excoriating DOJ investigation.”

        Probably gonna have to be made a condition of employment before some of the thugs turn them on.
        I wonder though if there isn’t a tech fix for this; old steam-gauge race tachs have a ‘tell-tale’ that follows the indicator and stops at the highest reading; the reset button is not available to the driver.
        There’s got to be a digital ‘analogue’, if you will.

        1. “You blew that engine deliberate!”
          -Harry Hog

          1. +1 Days of Scientology

  6. given that he’s been charged with murder for Scott’s death

    Wasn’t he charged with manslaughter?

    1. That’s the Eric Harris shooting in Tulsa.

      1. Thanks. Hard to keep so many isolated incidents straight.

          1. *nods in agreement*

  7. Shorter Ray Kelly:

    I obstructed justice until it became politically expedient to change course.

  8. the back of an officer blocks much of the view of Wilson

    Nice of the brother in blue to block the dash cam. Simple and effective.

    1. When they talk of the need for more training, they mean “in the destruction of evidence”.

      1. The 300 level courses involve how to tactfully plant a “throw-down.”

  9. As that great Roman historian Suetonius once said “people do not just become depraved”. In the same way, cops just don’t wake up one day and start shooting people. They work up to it and show their depravity in many ways before finally having the guts and getting the opportunity to shoot someone.

  10. Since I won’t be around for the PM links:

    Spot the Not: Ad Slogans

    1. Make 7 Up Yours

    2. How Else Can Two Month’s Salary Last Forever?

    3. Take a Cheetos Break with Cheetos

    4. It Kills Bugs Dead

    5. Virginia Is For History Lovers

    6. Be the King of Your Kitchen

    1. 6. I doubt this needs explanation.

      1. Yes – I think its six as well.

    2. 5. The slogan is “Virginia is for Lovers.”

      1. Wrong!

        Originally, they had come up with history ads, “Virginia is for History Lovers”; beach ads, “Virginia is for Beach Lovers”; and mountain ads, “Virginia is for Mountain Lovers”. This approach was eventually discarded as too limiting, and the qualifiers were dropped.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V…..for_Lovers

      2. You’ve got a friend in Pennsylvania.

        Virginia is for lovers.

        Get crabs in Maryland.

      3. Isn’t that “Vagina is for Lovers”? Maybe I’m a little homophobic.

    3. And the Not is #6.

      “Pele is king of soccer field. To be king of your kitchen, use Crestfield Wax Paper.”

      1. Men cook for sex and profit.

  11. Well, of course more is going to come out. You know that a pig that does something as egregious as shooting a fleeing man in the back, killing him, and then moving a taser close to the body, isn’t in his first rodeo. This didn’t happen out of the blue. In fact his trail of abuse is probably epic.

    1. In fact his trail of abuse is probably epic.

      Probably. But not just him. His buddies helped to cover it up and falsify reports. He’s not a rogue.

    2. Uh dude… Maybe you didn’t get the memo. The guy ran!

      1. “Hands up, don’t run.”

        – is evidently a phrase making the rounds in Law Enforcement friendly circles. Has anyone else heard it or read it yet?

        1. #fuckyourbreath

          1. defining words of a generation
            all that “boot on the neck, forever” thing!

    3. Exactly that. People don’t just become depraved. Just the act of shooting the guy is one hell of an act of depravity. The guy was running away and wasn’t a threat. It takes a lot of balls to shoot someone even if you really feel your life is in danger. To shoot someone in the back running away from you is something very few people could do at all.

      1. Whatever happened to that old man that shot the pregnant lady in the back?

        1. I hadn’t known about that case, FM, and my search engine is moving too slowly to find a good article with an update.

          1. Here it is. The guy walked. The lady wasn’t pregnant.
            http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new…..rglar.html

            1. Thanks, FM, and good work on defending your homefront this morning.

              1. I refuse to let old people clean out the Golden Corral before I get there.

      2. Oh, it is absolutely sociopathic. It is a cold, calculated decision to execute someone. The person is running away. They’re no threat any more. You have to line up on them because they’re fleeing. You have to actively want to do this. And Slager did.

        All because the guy annoyed him by struggling and then fleeing. A person’s life meant less to Slager than the gratification of punishing someone who annoyed him.

        1. Depraved indifference is a job requirement.

          1. “Depraved indifference is a job requirement.”

            I listened to part of an interview over the weekend in which a police chief explained how he and other officers were initially relieved (upon viewing footage) that two arresting officers hadn’t done any harm to a man who asphyxiated in the back of their patrol car.
            Despite the man’s increasing labored breathing and pleas for help – over the course of approximately eight minutes – the two officers remained steadfast in their belief that the dying man was trying to trick them.

            When there was public outrage following the video being released, the chief and his peers were surprised and couldn’t at first understand why everyone was so upset since the arresting officers clearly didn’t do anything wrong.

            It had to be explained to them from someone outside the force, I suppose.

            1. Had it not been a police car and had it been a dog instead the owner would have faced charges.

        2. You could do it if you had the kind of adrenaline and sense of fear you get in combat. I think that is what is going on in these cases. I think cops have talked so much shit about the “danger” they face they have started to believe it. They go out every day terrified and convinced they are in real danger of being killed and that every encounter could be their last. That is the only way I can explain them doing this kind of stuff. It is worse than just this guy being a sociopath. I wish it were that simple. I think it is instead and entire culture that gives the people in it such an inflated sense of danger and creates so much adrenaline and fear that they end up doing things like this.

          1. I think that what you describe certainly happens, like when an officer draws and starts shooting within seconds of encountering someone, even to the point that they’re shooting before they’ve even stopped shouting some command. But there are also the cases like this one, where there is a more calculated element to it. Slager wasn’t fear shooting or adrenaline shooting. He was “put the little fucker down for fucking with me” shooting. And I guarantee you there are plenty more like him: total sociopaths.

            I mean, what would be a better job for a depraved sociopath than cop?

            1. Gas chamber technician?

            2. It definitely attracts that kind of personality. Instead of working to weed that type out or discourage the hell out of them from acting on their impulses if you don’t, cop unions create a sense of total immunity, which of course only makes the already bad even worse.

              1. A while back I was working at a restaurant where the owners and managers were cop lovers. A couple of the managers (children of the owners) even became cops. They joked about how some officers were “hardasses.” I think that’s the term they use for those personality types. And they think it’s funny.

            3. “I mean, what would be a better job for a depraved sociopath than cop?”

              Leader of the National Socialists?.

              Oops.

            4. Look at how he acts after he kills the guy. He doesn’t look distressed. Hell, he starts doctoring the scene is a very casual way, with another cop standing right there watching.

              Who hasn’t been charged yet with obstruction of justice, as far as I know.

              1. That’s because he wasn’t obstructing justice, he was watching it happen!

                /cop

            5. Secretary of State

          2. “I think cops have talked so much shit about the “danger” they face they have started to believe it.”

            Yep. What it is is a police specific moral panic. They’re terrified of the public they’re allegedly supposed to be protecting.

      3. To shoot someone in the back running away from you is something very few people could do at all.

        Imagine the level if institutional depravity, that this cop obviously never thought anybody would even question a dead body with bullet holes in its back.

        That’s like Soviet-level shit – “the guy committed suicide by shooting himself in the head three times”.

        1. That is an apt analogy. Someone did a statistical analysis of all of the various known Soviet leaders whom the government claimed had died in “auto accidents”. It turned out that known members of the Soviet Communist Party were more likely to die in auto accidents than any other group of people in the world. They were more likely to die in an auto accident than long hall truckers who drove the infamous road of death in South America.

      4. I’d call it murder. I think that because of the elevated trust level the cop was endowed with, it should be a capital murder case. Since the cops get special protection when someone takes a shot at them, if they viciously murder a fleeing suspect then they should receive the absolute maximum punishment.

        Send the cop to Utah – they use a firing squad which would be an equivalent punishment to shooting an unarmed man eight time in the back.

  12. Spot the Not: Martin Luther

    1. Like the drivers of donkeys, who have to belabor the donkeys incessantly with rods and whips, or they will not obey, so must the ruler do with the people; they must drive, beat throttle, hang, burn, behead and torture, so as to make themselves feared and to keep the people in check.

    2. If I had to baptize a Jew, I would take him to the bridge of the Elbe, hang a stone round his neck and push him over with the words I baptize thee in the name of Abraham.

    3. It is not in opposition to the Holy Scriptures for a man to have several wives.

    4. People give ear to an upstart astrologer who strove to show that the earth revolves, not the heavens or the firmament, the sun and the moon.

    5. The word and works of God is quite clear, that women were made either to be wives or prostitutes.

    6. If one permits an infidel to continue in his role as a corrupter of the earth, the infidel’s moral suffering will be all the worse. If one kills the infidel, and this stops him from perpetrating his misdeeds, his death will be a blessing to him.

    1. 6 Sounds more like Mohammed.

      1. This is my pick. Same reason.

        1. Did you two not read all of option one?

          1. Yes. YOU pick it. I’m good with the psuedo-Islamic cleric choice.

            1. I thought Derpwatcher picked six to trick us.

              Two.

              1. True, you do know him better.

                1. Perhaps, Doom, but I have only guessed correctly twice that I know of.

    2. 5

    3. God, the only one I actually feel confident he DID say is 4.

      I’ll agree with the peanut gallery on 6 but something tells me the use of the word “infidel” is a colossal head-fake.

    4. The Not is #6- Ayatollah Khomeini said that.

      The word “infidel” seemed to throw people. Maybe I should have changed it to “heretic”. Infidel is not an Arabic or Persian word. They would say kafir. “Infidel” basically means “faithless” in Latin.

    5. 1 sounds like Machiavelli.

  13. I now understand why his family said he was a good guy and generally supports him: they are justifiably deathly afraid of him.

  14. re: the inevitable “Not All Cops” arguments:

    Not all pilots are suicidal sociopaths who will crash planes filled with passengers into mountainsides, either. The difference is that airlines have an incentive to mitigate suicidal behavior (including screening and counseling pilots) As a result, crashes instigated by suicidally depressive pilots are diminishingly rare. Police departments have no incentive to weed out abusive cops from their ranks, and every incentive to cover for and advance them. Aggressive cops pad their numbers and inflate their budgets, and raising issues over behavior engenders problems with the union. Respectful public servants might be tolerated, to the extent that they’re quiet and compliant, but whistleblowers are absolutely not countenanced. “Not all cops” are abusive, but the institution of policing makes it impossible to distinguish between them.

    1. Not all priests were sodomites with a taste for small boys. Somehow that fact doesn’t seem to make the systematic failures of the church to stop those who were any less loathsome. It is the same thing here.

      1. Not all TSA agents want to grope the genital areas of passengers. Wait, what am I saying, of course they do. Ware a cod piece when going through security.

        1. This doesn’t work, Lady. You are asked to go to a small room and remove the “unknown object” and then scrutinized even more than you usually are.

          I mean, I’m simply guessing this is what happend… I mean will happen if anyone tries this again… I mean for the first time.

          1. Precisely. And ladies, no pendant necklaces. It could be anything – improvised explosive device, death ray, cleverly concealed vial of Ebola – and it’s conveniently hanging at boob height.

        2. I once got felt up by either Chip or Dale (think it was the one with the black nose) at the Liberty Tree Tavern at Disney World.

          Jus’ sayin’

          1. Yeah but you were 30 years old and liked it. NTTAWWT

    2. It’s similar to Islamic terrorism. Yes, only a small % are responsible and all groups have evil members, but the problem remains because the rest tolerate it or support it indirectly.

    3. The other side to the “not all cops” arguments is…you still don’t know if the cop who pulls you over for a broken taillight will be a “good cop”…or Slager. The fact that there is a significant possibility that it could be a Slager is like saying “sure, the Ferris wheel is only dangerous 25% of the time”. Guess what? That’s an unacceptable number.

  15. OT: Fun story of the day:

    DENVER (CBS4) ? A CBS4 investigation has learned that two Transportation Security Administration screeners at Denver International Airport have been fired after they were discovered manipulating passenger screening systems to allow a male TSA employee to fondle the genital areas of attractive male passengers.

    http://denver.cbslocal.com/201…..-genitals/

    1. Remember if security at airports was still privately run, the women who were victims of this could sue the living fuck out of the security company. The threat of that and the bad pub that would go with it would have created one hell of an incentive to make sure their employees were not molesting women. Thanks to TSA, no one can be sued over this and we have to rely on the good will of bureaucrats to police their own. Good luck with that.

      1. “You can’t professionalize unless you federalize.”

        Tom Daschle, (D-ipshit), explaining the need for the TSA

        1. agreed –

          one logical step further

          “you can’t professionalize unless you governmentize”

          Explains all government officials or employees contempt for the private sector.

          1. Explains all some government officials or employees contempt for the private sector.

            FIFY

            1. Ivan – me-thinks my statement as written is by far more true than false.

              1. Ivan – me-thinks my statement as written is by far more true than false.

                I would disagree. Most federal employees I have worked with over the years hold no contempt for the private sector, just the opposite in fact. But your experience may be different. I just try to avoid absolutes.

      2. Fortunately, it seems no women were harmed in this story. On In the other hand…

        1. For fuck’s sake.

          But the recent case uncovered by CBS4 is more problematic for TSA since its own employee blew the whistle on the practice, a supervisor observed it happening, the agency fired the employees, and the female screener who was fired admitted to the fondling conspiracy.

          Earlier this month a prosecutor from the Denver District Attorney’s Office was asked to review the case but she declined to press charges because there was no reasonable likelihood of conviction and no victim had been identified.

          WHAT.

          1. It’s a victimless crime. Like punching someone in the dark.

            1. Well written, DL.

              After all, character is what you are in the dark.

          2. Oh, all of a sudden we’re not prosecuting “victimless” crimes? When did that start?

    2. “We’re not forcing you to have gay sex.” No, just the foreplay. And you don’t even get any cake!

  16. Bigorati.

    Why did it have to be bigorati?

  17. “appears to show Slager using a Taser on a man while the man is face-down on the pavement after being arrested.”

    Could have been worse. Slager could have ‘accidentally’ used his gun.

    1. Or he accidentally didn’t use his gun.

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  19. police dashcam that appears to show Slager using a Taser on a man while the man is face-down on the pavement after being arrested.

    I guess tasing people while they’re face down and defenseless is SOP now. He should just be glad Slager didn’t “accidentally” grab his gun instead.

  20. I hate (not) to say I told you so to body cam critics , as referenced in this article but the benefits of bodycams AND a public that is free to, heck ENCOURAGED to, videotape cops far outweigh the drawbacks. Video means that cops who are doing bad stuff will be held accountable FAR more frequently, and that includes in the criminal arena where the burden of evidence is the highest – that alone justifies Bodycams, as well as giving good cops the tool to protect themselves from false complaints, as well as incentivising both cops and people dealing with cops to behave better, as well as helping gather evidence of crimes cops are investigating

    A murder caught on film is compelling as hell and without that evidence it’s quite possible he would have avoided criminal charges, if not departmental ones

    BOOYA body cameras!!!l

    Booya people filming us!!!!!

    Any cop should assume that any interaction he has with others – in a house at a DV, on the street, etc is bring filmed. Operating under such sn assumption , is a simple way to nearly perfectly ensure a cop acts, NOT PERFECTLY ( a pipe dream) but in good faith and with restraint and that when he does not, he will be held accountable as well as protecting him from a false complaint

    Win win win

    All cops need to understand – this is a new age. We’ve always operated in a fishbowl, but now it’s one where there are ample cameras recording our actions, to EVERYBODY’s benefit

    1. ? What is derp?

      Baby don’t herp me
      Don’t herp me
      No more

      Derp derp whoa whoa ooh whoa oh whoa whoa
      Ooh whoa oh whoa whoa…. derp derp!

    2. body cam critics

      Who around here is a body cam critic?

      We’re cop critics. We think they will do all they can to minimize the burden that body cams place on their daily activities. That’s been the criticism – the conveniently lost data, the conveniently malfunctioning camera, the turning it off when you want to go all baboon on someone, that kind of shit.

      And the lack of accountability for it.

    3. You can’t spell “The artist known Dunphy” without “we shit on truth”.

      1. you forgot to log out and log back into your sockpuppet account before you insulted yourself, “dunphy”.

        1. I wonder who your other account is …

  21. Cilantro Pesto

    2 c. cilantro, or, lots and lots
    garlic
    olive oil
    pine nuts
    lemon juice
    parmesan

    Start by stripping the cilantro. Yes, I know no one ever does it in restaurants, but they’re being lazy barstards, and if you want to reward that kind of tomfoolery, that’s your business. Strip the leaves from the stems and check for slimy bits. Trust us.

    Save time, and don’t chop the garlic. Any food processor which can handle nuts is not going to notice your garlic.

    Nuts, garlic and cilantro go into your food processor. Add just a little oil and start blending. Gradually drizzle in oil. Very gradually. Plan for this to take some time. Watch a movie. Bring some porn. No, really, I joke – a third of a cup of oil ought to take just a couple minutes.

    When you have a good blend and emulsion, add a lot of parmesan. A lot. A good ratio of cilantro/nuts/parm would be 3:1:1 (if you started with that cilantro finely chopped).

    Season with lemon, salt and pepper. Et viola.

    1. Replacing basil with cilantro…interesting. But dude, Parmesan? Really? Use peccorino romano. You’ll thank me. Parmesan is too sweet.

      1. Ooh, you cook. Have you tried it with walnuts? Also a very nice change. I’ll try it with romano if you’ll try it with walnuts sometime.

        Of course, this means I’ll have an excuse be forced to make two pestos, one with parm and one with romano, so I can fully experience the difference. What. A. Tragedy.

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  23. Kelly is still an America-hating scumbag.

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  26. Google pay 97$ per hour my last pay check was $8500 working 1o hours a week online. My younger brother friend has been averaging 12k for months now and he works about 22 hours a week. I cant believe how easy it was once I tried it out.
    This is wha- I do…… ?????? http://www.netjob80.com

  27. We here in North Carolina have similar issues with a combination police/fire department due to the large amount of time required of officers to attend school and take refresher and required classwork to be both police officers and firefighters.

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