ISIS

The ISIS Conspiracies

How a century's worth of anxieties about America's southern border are affecting the latest foreign-policy crisis.

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The first ingredient was a sudden influx of immigrants over the southern border. The second was a war on the other side of the world, putting Americans on the alert for foreign plots. Just to make people more nervous, there was violent chaos in Mexico that the authorities clearly couldn't control. Add those together, and nervous Anglos were bound to start seeing the Rio Grande as another front in the war. The border itself seemed to be a threat—the sort of hazard Texas Gov. Rick Perry had in mind when he worried that there's a "very real possibility" that "individuals from ISIS or other terrorist states" are entering America from Mexico.

But Perry wasn't born yet. This period of border fear erupted a century ago, when the violent chaos to the south was the Mexican Revolution, not the drug war, and when the fighting on the other side of the Atlantic was World War I, not a Middle Eastern free-for-all. Throughout the 1910s, Anglo-Americans fretted about Mexican conspiracies to raid border towns, to set off domestic insurrections, and, after the European war broke out, to collaborate with the Germans.

Those notions weren't completely groundless. Border raids did periodically happen, most infamously when around 500 guerillas led by Pancho Vila attacked the town of Columbus, New Mexico, in 1916. The Plan de San Diego, a scheme to launch a revolution in the American southwest, really did exist, though when the uprising came it didn't amount to much. (Far more people were killed in the anti-Mexican pogroms that followed.) And in the infamous Zimmermann Telegram, Germany's foreign minister did offer to help the Mexicans recover their "lost territory in New Mexico, Texas, and Arizona" if they would join the war on the German side. (The proposal, which Mexico did not accept, helped push the United States into World War I.)

Facts like these fueled far more dubious tales, which in turn sparked surveillance and repression of Mexican Americans who had nothing to do with any espionage or violence. In East Los Angeles: History of a Barrio, Ricardo Romo calls this anti-Chicano crusade the Brown Scare. (This is unrelated to America's periodic panics over the far right, which have also been described as Brown Scares.) In an especially bizarre episode in 1917, the sheriff of Los Angeles County realized with alarm that thousands of Mexicans had suddenly quit their jobs and left the city; he speculated that "trouble" was on the way. The trouble never presented itself, but a more likely explanation for the exodus did: Employers elsewhere were paying higher wages.

It would not be the last time anxieties about the border would be overlaid with fears of some subversive force. In 1940, for example, the sheriff of El Paso County became convinced that local labor leaders were controlled by the Communists—he basically believed that everyone in the CIO was controlled by Communists—and that these reds in turn were linked to organizers in Juárez, Mexico. The House Committee on Un-American Activities came to investigate, and the county attorney was soon warning that "aliens" were coming "to plow the ground for the planting of the Soviet seed."

More recently, parts of the American right have combined their fears of Mexico and Muslims, worrying that a Middle Eastern enemy would strike the U.S. from the south. In the wake of 9/11, texts like Michelle Malkin's Invasion argued that lax controls along the border (and elsewhere) were paving the way for another attack. In 2011, Gov. Perry claimed that "Hamas and Hezbollah are working in Mexico…with their ploy to come into the United States." And now we have ISIS, a group whose very name, with its scent of ancient mystery cults, seems tailor made for conspiracy stories.

The ISIS stories aren't very plausible. ISIS has focused its energy on seizing territory and building a state, not establishing cells to carry out attacks around the world. The leaders who went to war with ISIS, including the president himself, have conceded repeatedly that they have no evidence the group is plotting against America, stressing instead the possibility that it will be in a position to attack us in the future. And if an assault is brewing, the Department of Homeland Security doesn't think it involves Mexico. Last week several senior officials from the department told Congress that they don't, in one speaker's words, "have any credible information" involving "known or suspected terrorists coming across the border." The most the agency had seen was some "social media exchanges" in which ISIS supporters discuss a cross-border attack as "a possibility." In other words, some people kicked the idea around on Twitter.

Are the White House and Homeland Security capable of getting their facts wrong? Absolutely, though right now their incentive is to err on the side of fear, not calm. Have people with some sort of terror ties entered the U.S. via Mexico in the past? Yes, though that doesn't seem to be the most common route. Is it possible that ISIS might shift some resources toward trying to kill Americans in America instead of the Middle East? Sure—particularly now that Washington is at war with the group. (There's a good chance the Pentagon's air strikes are making us less secure, not more.) But if you want to convince me that ISIS cabals are lurking beneath Texas and preparing to charge, you need to present some convincing evidence. Instead we get rumors and conjecture.

The most widely cited ISIS-invasion tale appeared when the conservative watchdog Judicial Watch announced that "government sources" believed ISIS was planning attacks from a base in Juárez. The sourcing was vague, officials denied the report, and no one has managed to corroborate it. And that weak yarn is the story with the strongest evidence. Go beyond that and you find folks like Gary Painter, the sheriff of Midland County, Texas, whose reason for believing an ISIS plot might be afoot is that illegal aliens have allegedly left "Muslim clothes" and "Quran books" along their trail. Or the Breitbart article announcing that a "Muslim prayer rug" had been discovered on the Arizona border. (On closer examination, the item appears to be an Adidas shirt.)

The real source of this anxiety amounts to a hunch, not a clue: a general unease about people crossing frontiers. Movement and privacy are essential freedoms, but when the individuals exercising those liberties come from outside the tribe, some people inside the tribe get worried. As one congressman put it, "With a porous southern border, we have no idea who's in our country." It's not what he knows that worries him; it what he doesn't know.

The congressman in question is Rep. Jeff Duncan (R–S.C.). I saw his statement in a New York Times piece about these ISIS conspiracy stories, where Duncan's comment came after a more clear-eyed remark from another congressman, the Texas Democrat Beto O'Rourke. "There's a longstanding history in this country of projecting whatever fears we have onto the border," O'Rourke told the Times. "In the absence of understanding the border, they insert their fears. Before it was Iran and Al Qaeda. Now it's ISIS."

So it ever was. In 1917, at the height of Romo's Brown Scare, the Los Angeles Times issued this warning:

If the people of Los Angeles knew what was happening on our border, they would not sleep at night. Sedition, conspiracy, and plots are in the very air. Telegraph lines are tapped, spies come and go at will. German nationals hob-nob with Mexican bandits, Japanese agents, and renegades from this country. Code messages are relayed from place to place along the border, frequently passing through six or eight people from sender to receiver. Los Angeles is the headquarters for this vicious system, and it is there that the deals between German and Mexican representatives are frequently made.

People were scared of Germany then; people are scared of ISIS now. Enemies come and go, but the dread that never disappears is the fear of the border itself.

NEXT: Obama Promises That Military Operation Involving Hundreds of Airstrikes and Troops Won't Be a Combat Mission or a Ground War

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  1. Look, ISIS is scary, really scary! And we have a youtube video to prove it! So be scared, sheep!

  2. Amendment to arm Syrian rebels passes 273-156 per Amash’s twitter.

    1. But no Democrats voted for it, right?

    2. That is some grade A stupid right there.

      Really, worst president ever. Carter was a fucking foreign policy genius compared to this fuckwit.

      1. Carter – Cyrus Vance and Zbigniew Brzezinski

        Obama – Susan Rice and John Kerry

        1. Wow. makes Carter’s troika look like the A team … FUCK!

  3. Why are we so worried about controlling our borders? No other country does. Traveling from the US to the EU, for example, you will find the customs and immigration desks have been replaced with wide open gates flanked by loudspeakers playing a constant loop of Gus Cannon’s “Walk Right In”.

    1. And when Ghadafi threatened to make Libya into a springboard for African migration into Europe Europe didn’t start bombing him and supporting the rebels. Especially not on the same day his son was on a diplomatic visit to the United States.

    2. I don’t like the EU as a model, but maybe that’s just me

      1. What existing country would you like as a model?

          1. Brilliant, yes! Send our Illegals there. Win-win-win.

          2. If only they could get a top notch spokesperson to do their media. Perhaps a top notch redhead.

    3. Not my fault you didn’t qualify for a Schengen visa, bro.

      1. Nor is it my fault that our illegals don’t qualify for US documentation either.

        Bro.

        1. Really?

          You’re going to respond to a light-hearted joke by pouting like a petulant infant while hovering your ass over the punch bowl and dumping a smelly shit?

          Forget it. I’ll just leave you alone in stentorian, humorless curmudgeon land. You seem to like it there.

          1. I missed the joke, for which I apologize.

  4. OT:

    JournoList strikes again. This time in gaming journalism

    http://www.breitbart.com/Breit…..lism-elite

    So is reason going to cover #gamergate now?

    1. I wonder if the GameJournoPros list had anything to do with game journalists shitbagging reason’s video game magazine cover a few months back?

      Also #gamergate has suffered widespread deletions of discussions about it on Reddit. It seems 10s of thousands of posts were deleted there and given lame excuses for deletions by reddit for spamming and upvoting by mods…this seems somewhat reminiscent of Nick and reason links being deleted on reddit a few years back.

      1. I also remember Game and tech sites shitbagging reason’s millennial polls a few months back as well….and polygon was one of them.

    2. Great takedown of Quinn yesterday at Niche Gamer.

      First of all, you are not the center of Gamer Gate. You were never the center of Gamer Gate. This victim-complex you have that convinces you that you are the center of this conspiracy is doing you a horrible disservice. It’s making you look even crazier than you’ve already proven yourself to be, and acting like you are the big giant red X in the middle of the dart board just screams “clueless”. No Zoe, you are not that important. This isn’t about you. In reality, you were simply the first domino that fell in a gigantic Rube Goldberg machine of gaming journalist failure.

      As I said before, this is about corruption and collusion. Unfair coverage and silencing of developers. Intimidation and cronyism. This isn’t about you, your ex, your ex’s ex, your sex life, your trendy lip piercing or your hair color. This isn’t about you in even the slightest. What this *is* about, however, is the “San Francisco scene” you and Phil fish ran around in. You can play it off and act like it’s just conspiracy nerds throwing around wild theories, but with how much has been dug out and how much of it has been both verified and fact checked, you look really foolish by passing it all off as wild fantasies and make-believe.

    3. before i ask WTF ‘gamergate’ is…

      … please, in a sentence, tell me why i should care.

      1. Gamers are figuring out that the media is just as corrupt and venal and leftist as libertarians already know it is.

        1. That’s not true. What the SJWs and the internet media is gearing up for is FCC-like content controls for the internet. Those they can’t shame or bullying into silence will have to be taken care of by DaddyGov.

          1. What the SJWs and the internet media is gearing up for is FCC-like content controls for the internet.

            Then they’re deluded. Outside of the tumblr-land circle jerk no one gives a shit about this chick or self-important gaming journalists. What they will get is a fuckload of pushback if there was even a breath of censorship. Hell, they can’t even successfully tax the damn thing; how the hell do they think they’ll regulate speech on it?

            1. They got 10s of 1000s of Reddit posts deleted and got all mentions of #gamergate deleted on 4chan.

              Seriously if they can censor the butthole of the internet they can regulate speech.

            2. Uh, it’s already happening. The targets are game developers and journalists and the gaming mags and sites are using a variety of tactics to censor, bully, and blackball people for not towing their lion.

              Here is a good summation of the why of it.

              Why is it happening?
              Over the last five years, the gaming media has grown increasingly politicized, all with the same political stance and agenda. It has become almost unheard of for a gaming news piece not to include at least a passing comment about a game being retrograde for not matching this stance, or for a game to be praised to the moon because it reflects the right politics. Many gamers are sick of it. Add on to this the claims of corruption, of censorship, of blacklisting, and of careers ruined, and these gamers have become incensed.

              Gamers have been lied to, belittled, shamed, stifled, and held in contempt by the industry they created and continue to drive. Developers have been attacked, silenced, belittled, and forced to compromise their art by this same industry.

              It has to stop. GamerGate is a grassroots movement by the gaming community to hold the press accountable for their actions and to demand better.

              Lots of links, and, if you are really, really bored, 2600+ comments in the thread talking about it. The first post is all you need though.

              1. Yeah, i glanced over your link, and fuck me its like 10,000 words to say the simplest fucking thing.

                You want a ‘gate’? How about “kids can barely write in the English language anymore”-Gate.

                I get that its something about “gaming journalism”…

                but for fuck’s sake, is there really that much to talk about … games?

                “Red Dead Redemption and Fallout 3 were awesome. The End”.

                Beyond that, i don’t know what there is to say.

                But i hope kids take something away from it, to the tune of “political correctedness is some fucking lame-ass bullshit”

        2. We’ll see. The gaming community is a mixed crowd, but there are definitely a lot of young people involved in it. I think it is notable that there has been significant push-back against the PC mentality that has rolled over so many other parts of our culture. If there is anything to Reason’s doting on millenials the gaming community pushing back might actually be an example of it.

      2. Journalists colluding to shape the news and push an agenda at the expense of informing readers and consumers.

        Want to find the game you want to play? Nope you only get news about games a small cliche wants you to play.

        1. Also as i mentioned i think they have attacked reason.

          Which offends me greatly cuz that is our job.

      3. In a sentence: Because it is one area of popular culture that is pushing back against the SJW machine.

        1. Fun video!!

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9MxqSwzFy5w

          Note: Yeah AEI are a bunch of neocons…but the points made in the video are still good.

    4. Honestly, it seems like #gamergate would be a big opportunity for Reason to put up a regular gaming column, and poach people who want a less asinine perspective. Ideally without being any more ideological than their movie reviews, what with cramming preachy shit everywhere being the reason people are annoyed with gaming journalism right now.

      I’d appreciate it. I normally keep up to date on gaming with RPS, but it has been spiraling shitterward pretty much since KG left. Which reminds me, I bet there’s an equivalent scandal in the comics world if you look hard enough.

      Still, there’s something really weird about seeing people I normally relate to in a journalist-audience sense become the subjects of a story rather than the tellers.

      1. Still, I have to wonder where the doxxing and threats of violence were against Square Enix and Gamespot over firing reviewer Jeff Gerstman, who didn’t give a properly positive review was. But a woman accused of taking part in a cozy relationship with journalists? Somehow, now, it’s a problem and doxxing and rape threats are now “pushback against PC”.

        1. …and a now there’s a vast conspiriacy that must be stopped.

          1. I think it is the straw the broke the camel’s back.

            Been reading a lot of #gamergate on twitter and previous breaks in ethics and corruption have been mentioned.

            Not just the Gerstman thing but Including journalists giving devs and personalities money via patron who they are covering, indy devs being blacklisted who don’t tow the lion, a women’s charity group being black listed, Devs winning awards who are friends with journalists who are the judges, etc.

            1. I hope that’s what is going on.

        2. Maybe, just maybe, people don’t get fired up about fairly standard corruption as they get over people trying to shove their politics down your throat, ruining an entire entertainment medium in the process.

          1. WW, I’m hard put to see where anything is being forced on anyone. Or how gaming is being ruined. Perhaps you can tell me what Quinn or Sarkeesian have done to do earn such hostility?

            1. Quinn took down a youtube video critical of her using false copyright claims.

              Quinn was payed through patron by journalists covering her (not her fault but her name is mentioned in regards to journalist corruption)

              Quinn attacked a women’s charity in regards to their game jam got her friends in the media to blacklist them so she could promote her own charity game jam.

              Sarkeesian is a side show to #gamergate really. Mostly she comes up because many of these gaming sites and MSM used harassment claims directed at her to cover up #gamergate. It was not the gamers who brought her into all this. It was her and her Journalist friends who keep plastering her face up in hopes that it will distract from the layers of corruption.

              1. Assuming that’s all true (and not just a bunch of shit exaggerated or fabricated by a bunch of bitter loser devs who can’t get their own games published and her competitors in the industry) her actions describe less some PC harridan and more a ruthlessly ambitious person playing the game the way it’s been set out.

                With regards to payola, again, the reaction to Square Enix demanding that Gamespot ditch a reviewer over a (fairly meh) bad review was as a fart in a hurricane compared to the anger towards Quinn.

                1. bad review was as a fart in a hurricane compared to the anger towards Quinn.

                  She does keep inserting herself into the discussion.

                  Also most of the heat is on Polygon and Kotaku right now.

                  To be honest I don’t even want to talk about her. And until you brought her up i haven’t. You are right that she was ambitious. It just happens that Game journalists, not Quinn, had pretty fucked up ethics and were colluding which facilitated her rise to fame. It is the game journalists who made up the fucked up system and the dirty rules…she just followed them.

                  Also you have to take the chaff with the cream here. It is the internet and any asshole can post a tweet with #gamegate.

            2. Much of the hostility seems to come as a reaction to their self-important, condescending, holier-than-thou, but self-serving and at least partly dishonest attempts to impose Third Wave feminist/politically-correct norms on gaming.

              1. And how can one crooked indie developer and one commentator with a YouTube series topple the Billion dollar gaming industry?

                Regarding the hostility itself, it’s perplexing that people who consider their own vitriol “reasoned discourse which must be considered” would get their panties so twisted by someone taking a look at video game storytelling.

                1. Nobody said they would “topple” it, but they are stirring up a shitstorm far out of proportion to their numbers, due to undue and sometimes unethical influence in the game journalism world, including (in Quinn’s case) sleeping with people who then gave her game unduly positive reviews.

                  I think the major pushback is due to a bunch of people who don’t like being called racist sexist homophobes because their favorite games don’t comply with this week’s PC mandates. Bluenoses, political commissars, and other “reformers” are usually not welcomed wherever people are having fun.

                  1. Well, unless Quinn has the VayJay of Venus I don’t see what kind of damage one person can do or how much influence she can wield – certainly not enough to get doxxed and threatened IRL.

                    WRT Sarkeesian, if all she is is a humorless killjoy with YouTube series then why do the “honest discussion” types get so defensive? Without the flaming MRA butthurt virtually no one would have ever heard or cared about it and it wouldn’t have changed a damn thing – and it won’t either way. Conducting a “misandrist” witch hunt does more to validate claims of sexism – like it or not – and change the focus from crooked journos to sexism.

                    Obviously, I’ve got no dog in the gender war nor do I (or anyone) have perfect information – I’m just calling it as I see it and it looks pretty bad.

                2. I don’t know about topple.

                  To be honest game coverage of AAA games is pretty good and thorough on these sites. Mostly just cut and paste from press releases and when those games broke big game news sites would just link to youtubers and fan comments anyway. “my new xbone is a brick” “Netcode in BF4 sucks” that sort of thing.

                  What I noticed even before this all broke is indi games being ignored or unfairly treated and games which had no place getting the coverage they got having multiple articles about them. The divergence between what say grassroots youtuber fans were talking about and what Kotaku and Polygon were talking about just entered into weirdness.

                  The radical “trope” feminist thing was just the most identifiable divergence between the grassroots fan based media and what big sites were dishing out to their readers.

                  1. That disparity is just why people have lost a lot of faith in the news media: people can detect slanted news. I suppose I first noticed it in the ’70s, when movies and TV began to go out of their way to depict street crime as something committed by people of pretty much any race other than black. Well, maybe there would be some blacks in a nice multi-racial gang, but that was as far as they’d go. That was around the time a lot of newspapers stopped mentioning the race of suspects.

                    These days, it’s why I don’t read io9, even though in theory it’s just my sort of site. Too bad they’re so intent on pushing feminism, gay rights, and other such topics.

        3. I think a lot of it comes down to the fact that the Gerstman thing was simple corruption.

          But the constant waving of the SJW banner is basically the gameprogs constantly talking shit about their own audience. The insult is compounded since they use typical PC prog methods to pressure people that disagree with them on their sites to shut up (where they don’t just silence them directly through moderation), in lieu of actually trying to win them over. Since they control most of the major sites, that leaves a lot of gamers feeling alienated, humiliated, voiceless, and powerless.

          Eventually there’s going to be some final breaking point that provokes the peasants to revolt, and the actual event, especially as more information comes in, might seem somewhat minor. The most recent analogy I can think of is Ferguson. A possible strong-arm robber is not the most sympathetic poster-boy for police brutality, but his death was latched onto as a symbol for a lot of other shit that black people there caught at the hands of the white police.

          1. If Slate of all places gets it, well…

            1. Twitch.tv, the latter of which was just bought by Amazon for $1 billion as the gaming press was declaring the end of gamers.

              lulz

              that is some facepalm worthy stuff.

          2. where they don’t just silence them directly through moderation

            Yeah I am outright banned on polygon for calling Ezra Kline an “eliminationist” and shadow banned on Kotaku for talking against Net neutrality in the comments of an article payed for by netflix advocating for net neutrailty.

            Both happened well before #gamergate.

      2. I bet there’s an equivalent scandal in the comics world if you look hard enough.

        I would not take that bet:

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB6TiRJNI-Q

        Actually looking at the sites that ran the “OMG spiderwoman crawls like spiderman in a costume like spiderman! Misogyny” articles and the timing of them I would bet it is linked to GameJournoPros.

        1. This same sort of SJW crap is happening in science fiction and fantasy for a few years now.

          1. Milo posted an image of a comment you wrote about that in a #gamergate tweet

            I thought it was you…I even tried to find where you wrote it but could not.

            1. Really? Cool. I’ll have to try to find that.

            2. Here it is. He calls it a “fascinating comment.” I take a bow.

              I wrote it in this thread.

  5. What if there was a conspiracy of independent millennials?

    1. Shut the front door!

  6. 9/11 was not filmed on a Hollywood back lot.

    1. But the “moon landing” was.

      *adjusts Reynolds Wrap? hat*

  7. I live bout 60 miles from the border and think the chances of terrorists coming across is slim to none. The cartels are a multi billion dollar business. And they ruthlessly control the established smuggling routes into the US. From a business perspective, either taking money from terrorist groups or looking the other way while they cross does not make sense. The minute there is definitive proof that a cartel helped ISIS, al-Qaeda , or some random Yemeni boy scout troop cross the border, all hell would break loose. The last thing they want is us flying armed drones into Sonora. To me, it makes more sense that they would actively prevent any crossing of terrorist through their territory.

    1. Why do drug smugglers allow wide spread illegal immigration then? It would be in their business interest to shut it down in order to prevent expanded border controls. heck one year of no border crosses and that would be then end of talk of a border fence. Strangely though these savvy good hearted business men don’t see that as in their interests.

      1. They are in the human smuggling business also. You don’t use those corridors without paying a toll.

        1. Well good thing ISIS hasn’t recently gotten its hands on a ton of cash. If they had for instance recently robbed a bank of a half a billion dollars they could pay a pretty sweet toll.

      2. Re: Sam Haysom,

        Why do drug smugglers allow wide spread illegal immigration then?

        Because immigration itself is harmless plus immigrants carry the product on their backs.

        It would be in their business interest to shut it down in order to prevent expanded border controls.

        No, it won’t be in their best interest. Use your head. Sending hordes of immigrants across the border keeps that same border “control” very occupied in harassing people and citizens instead of looking for drugs.

        1. Except that it doesn’t. Most drugs cross the border in planes and trucks anyways. Basically the current strategy is to assume you will lose some planes and some trucks but to make it up on volume. The idea that a large portion of drugs is being humped across the border on someone’s back is laughable. If a border fence were to be built that would free up more border agents for check points which would be bad for drug barons rather than policing the unfenced border.

        2. I highly doubt cartels are doing background checks on the droves of people crossing the border. While they may filter out someone wearing an I’m with ISIS t-shirt (and I doubt that), any future terrorist probably doesn’t make their plans known to everyone they meet anyway.

      3. People in organized crime do their best to maintain the status quo. If terrorist incidents start happening in the US then business dries up for the cartels.

      4. Why do drug smugglers allow wide spread illegal immigration then?

        Because it’s profitable, and because the US military is not going to bomb the cartels to save your minimum wage job.

    2. Now there’s an idea whose time has come. Outsource border security to narco gangs.

      Sinaloa Cartel: doing the jobs that the American Department of Homeland Security won’t do.

      1. Somebody (Kinky Friedman?) had a great idea for border control. Something like:

        Set up a $5mm fund for each governor or capo or jefe or whatever they call them in the border provinces. Deduct $10K from it every time we catch an illegal crossing from their province. Pay them whatever remains at the end of the year, and start over.

        Essentially, outsource the Border Patrol, with a creamy nougat center of corruption, bribery, and self-interest.

        I’m guessing it would work a charm.

        1. Wouldn’t they just slaughter people trying to cross the border then? I mean, it’s a solution, but perhaps not the best one.

          1. On the up side the ones that make it here are proven to be motivated, resourceful, and brave. So there would be that.

          2. Well, our hands are clean…

        2. What is northern Mexico were populated by Apaches hyped up on German meth?

          Sorry, I just read Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian.

          1. Best book *ever*.

  8. What do millennials think of ISIS? Or do they prefer Shazam?

    1. Is that the name for the new iPhone 6?

      There’s your answer.

    2. Well, there’s also Electro Woman and perhaps Dr. Shrinker.

  9. I think the peak of the “Brown Menace” in my lifetime was circa 2006(?) or so, when Lou Dobbs introduced the world to the Invasion of Mexican Lepers

    1. What I remember best was the complete absence of huge 100000 plus marches with thousands of Mexican flags and hundreds of frankly violence promoting signs in LA that summer. It’s almost like the “Brown peril” was a rational reaction to a blatant display of ethnic nationalism.

      1. Right.

        Because that’s the same as *lepers*.

  10. I mentioned this earlier, but it’s worth saying again. We are, more than anything, a commercial and economic power. Instead of trying to “solve” the Middle East by military means, why not buy them off? “Here, have ten thousand ritually purified, virgin sexbots.”

    1. sort of hard to ‘buy off’ people whose idea of a utopian society is a “6th century desert-commune”

      1. We can do that. Jannahland. Full of sexbot virgins, all-you-can-eat buffets, hashish, games of untold violence, and a giant black stone that speaks Koran verses (voiced by Morgan Freeman).

      2. You’ll need a steady stream a bots that are programmed to resist at first and then convert. And a few to make examples of.

        1. Sure, we can accommodate all faiths and creeds.

    2. Make them transparent and filled with wine-colored liquid. I hear they like that sort of thing, don’t ask me why.

    3. Same problem every briber / blackmail target has: how do you enforce the other guy’s end of the deal.

  11. So on there’s few people very worried, most people mildly concerned or unconcerned and then a few who would embrace ISIS. Good job rediscovering the bell curve.

  12. “Those notions weren’t completely groundless. Border raids did periodically happen, most infamously when around 500 guerillas led by Pancho Vila attacked the town of Columbus, New Mexico, ”

    Well Jesse, it seems that not only were the border dewellers fears not only “weren’t completely groundless” they were in fact “completely grounded”.

    While you mention only this one incursion across the broder by armed groups there were, in fact, quite a few more, making border residents quite rational in their concern.

    I suppose, simce you didn’t live there in that time it is easy for you to give their cincerns short thrift.

    And since you don’t live there today as well, you also find it easy to find fault with the fears of those who do and have to live with the adverse consequences of politiciaans who don’t live there either.

    Come visit the Texas border Jesse. See the effects on your fellow citicens who do live there firsthand.

    1. This person spells like a Mexican.

  13. Well Jesse, it seems that not only were the border dewellers fears not only “weren’t completely groundless” they were in fact “completely grounded”.

    From the article: “Facts like these fueled far more dubious tales, which in turn sparked surveillance and repression of Mexican Americans who had nothing to do with any espionage or violence.”

    While you mention only this one incursion across the broder by armed groups there were, in fact, quite a few more, making border residents quite rational in their concern.

    From the part of the article you just quoted: “Border raids did periodically happen.”

    Come visit the Texas border Jesse. See the effects on your fellow citicens who do live there firsthand.

    My brother used to live there. I’m familiar with the problems, and I strongly support the reform that would do the most to end them: Stop turning immigration into a black market. (Well, that and ending various unfunded mandates.)

    1. Last week several senior officials from the department told Congress that they don’t, in one speaker’s words, “have any credible information” involving “known or suspected terrorists coming across the border.”

      Since we have basically no idea who the hell comes over the border, that’s not reassuring.

      1. When IRS officials say they have no credible info about known or suspected plots against political organizations, Reason is duly skeptical.

        When DHS officials say the same about terrorists crossing the border, suddenly they treat govt agency speech as if it’s Gospel.

        1. When DHS officials say the same about terrorists crossing the border, suddenly they treat govt agency speech as if it’s Gospel.

          From the article: “Are the White House and Homeland Security capable of getting their facts wrong? Absolutely.” I know you’re aware of this part of the article, since you already quoted it in another comment.

        2. “When IRS officials say they have no credible info about known or suspected plots against political organizations, Reason is duly skeptical.

          When DHS officials say the same about terrorists crossing the border, suddenly they treat govt agency speech as if it’s Gospel.”

          Well, to your point =

          It is in the IRS’s Interests to Deny Wrongdoing
          – therefore should be treated skeptically.

          The DHS, by contrast, would LOVE to tell us about how many terrorists they bust, the plots they’ve uncovered, and their ‘suspected #’ of infiltrators per month… because it is in their interests to *justify their own existence*

          The fact that they can not substantiate any cases of known terrorist threats is therefore *highly credible*

          This is ignoring the even more important difference in your examples – which is that there is

          a)substantial independent evidence of the former, and

          b) zero independent evidence of the latter.

          Frankly that’s a ridiculous comparison, and it doesn’t come close to the point you are trying to make.

  14. Are the White House and Homeland Security capable of getting their facts wrong? Absolutely, though right now their incentive is to err on the side of fear, not calm.

    Not so. The White House has every reason to minimize ISIS’ operational capability. This is a group that Obama was either ignoring or making fun of until a few weeks ago… he absolutely would not benefit from painting them as a serious threat to the US. This non-war war is being carried out just to mitigate the PR damage from his foolish foreign policy.

    And he also agrees with you that we should not secure the border, and should allow uncontrolled immigration of more easily ruled third-worlders into this den of relatively wealthy and liberty-loving iniquity we call America. So I’m not surprised his DHS lackeys are also minimizing the potential problems of our de facto open borders policy. If you are surprised, you need to go to cynicism school.

    1. Your description of Obama’s aims and behavior bears very little resemblance to what I see him doing. But set that aside; I granted that he could be wrong. It’s just that?to quote the end of that paragraph?”if you want to convince me that ISIS cabals are lurking beneath Texas and preparing to charge, you need to present some convincing evidence. Instead we get rumors and conjecture.”

    2. ^^^^HELL YES^^^^

  15. Have people with some sort of terror ties entered the U.S. via Mexico in the past? Yes, though that doesn’t seem to be the most common route. Is it possible that ISIS might shift some resources toward trying to kill Americans in America instead of the Middle East? Sure?particularly now that Washington is at war with the group.

    Right, I’m sure ISIS would leave us alone if we leave them alone. While our stultified foreign policy has certainly made it easier for AQ and ISIS, etc, to find new recruits, you’re a fool if you think those organizations will ever forego opportunities to attack us, regardless of what we do.

    It’s not a “conspiracy theory” to recognize that a fundamentally hostile group with the means, motive, and opportunity to attack you is going to try to attack you. Where’s the goddam conspiracy in that statement, Mr Walker? Do you even know what a conspiracy is? ISIS is very forthcoming about what they want to do to us, not secret at all.

    1. Do you even know what a conspiracy is?

      Yes. Given that the alleged ISIS plots involve more than one person acting in secret, they clearly qualify.

    2. “It’s not a “conspiracy theory” to recognize that a fundamentally hostile group with the means, motive, and opportunity to attack you is going to try to attack you”

      Well, until you have actual evidence of “ISIS in Juarez
      (Rated: ‘Mostly False’)

      …its may not be a ‘conspiracy theory’, but its certainly ‘speculative bullshit’

      Particularly when there’s really no reason to ‘sneak’ into a country that will let people in through the front door – as do the vast majority of ‘illegals’ in the US.

      “In 2011, then-presidential candidate Mitt Romney (and several other Republican candidates) said the Islamic militant group Hezbollah was working in Mexico, and we rated that claim Mostly False. (We found some evidence of Hezbollah sympathizers working in South and Central America,but little evidence for the group “working” in Mexico.)

      In 2010, Judicial Watch published a story with the headline: “Feds Warn Of Terrorists Sneaking Into U.S. Through Mexico.”

      O’Rourke, the Texas representative, has said that he came across an El Paso newspaper story from 1981 about Libyan terrorists in Juarez, though evidence of such a group was never found.

      Despite years of these claims, Schanzer said he is not aware of a “single person arrested for a terrorism-related offense after crossing the border illegally.””

  16. ISIS is actually a pretty good example of open borders at work. Most of the jihadis there are foreigners. None of them got any states permission to cross into Syria or Iraq. And now that they’re there (as illegal aliens so to speak), they are choosing not to assimilate but to transform that society into one that they freely prefer but that they weren’t free to create back where they were.

    ISIS is a libertarian wet dream.

    1. We deserve a better quality border control troll.

  17. my buddy’s mom makes $82 /hr on the computer . She has been fired for nine months but last month her payment was $16443 just working on the computer for a few hours. i was reading this…………

    http://www.Jobs400.com

  18. We have a border?

    http://www.securitymanagement……hub-007779

  19. Officials said Arbabsiar flew from Iran through Frankfurt, Germany, to Mexico City Sept. 29 for a final planning session, but was refused entry to Mexico and later put on a plane to New York, where he was arrested.

    Arbabsiar also reportedly told the undercover DEA informant that his contacts in the Iranian government could provide “tons of opium” for the Mexican cartels, according to officials who have reviewed the case file.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/…..d=14711933

  20. http://www.thegatewaypundit.co…..-11-video/

    OK, so this website is a this and that, the guy is a so and so, but the last sentence says it best.

    Do you lock your doors at night, when you are away? Arm your vehcle security system? Do have a home security system? Why? What scares you so? Are you a sheeple?

    Does the Libertarian party or it’s philosophy have some kind of tech the geographically contains terrorists? If so, can we see it tweaked to stop the Mexican drug cartels? Just for a test.

    When did security, minus all the hype, become such a bad thing?

  21. my classmate’s step-mother makes $84 /hr on the laptop . She has been without work for 8 months but last month her payment was $12204 just working on the laptop for a few hours. you can try this out….

    ???????? http://www.netjob70.com

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