Drug War

Virginia State Police Raid Grandmother's House for Drugs, Make an Arrest Two Doors Down

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no elderly abuse charges for cops, natch
WTVR

Seventy-five-year-old Ruth Hunter says in the six years she's lived in an apartment complex in Henrico, Virginia, she's largely kept to herself. She says even her granddaughter doesn't like to come to visit there. Earlier this month though, State Police did visit, with a warrant authorizing a search for drugs. Hunter says she thought someone was trying to rob and kill her when she heard police opening the door. She says the cops tied her hands up and told her she was under arrest. Via local CBS affiliate WTVR:

She said she was shocked at the line of questioning from State Police, on the morning of April 10.

"Asked me if I ever stored drugs for anybody—I said how dare you insult my integrity."

Hunter said that is when police started asking about her loved ones.

"He asked if maybe my granddaughter was involved. I sat up in my bed like how dare you try and bring my granddaughter into this stuff. She's a law abiding citizen, works for a living, she don't even like coming here," Hunter said.

Cops apparently ended up making an actual arrest, two doors down. Hunter says they left her tied up when they went down the hall to make that arrest. No drugs were found in Hunter's home, but her address is the one that appeared on the warrant. A woman in the house where the arrest was made suggested someone mixed up Apartments E and G, the two that cops visited.

State police won't comment because of the "ongoing investigation." Hunter plans on moving out, and says she's upset with the police. "He never said I'm sorry, never apologized for having the wrong house," she told WTVR. "He said you got to get someone to fix that door."

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  1. “He said you got to get someone to fix that door.”

    Jesus Christ.

    1. What do you mean? These nice cops have guaranteed that Ms. Hunter and her assigns will enjoy a more comfortable life courtesy of the taxpayers. They did it this way because they are nice guys.

      1. It’s so villainous, almost cartoonishly so.

        *Smack! Punches woman in the face*
        “You should go get that checked out”

        1. Playa, most of these guys think that action movie dialog is smart and witty.

    2. DC cops kicked in the door to my MiL’s house some years ago, because the idiot 911 operator somehow managed to type in her address to a silent 911 call, that came from elsewhere in the city.

      Since she was out of town and the door was impossible to lock, we had to have someone stay there all night and then had to get someone to fix it as well. Dicks.

  2. Two doors down
    They’re laughing and drinkin’, and having a party.
    Two doors down
    They’re not aware that I’m around.

  3. Authoritarians always try to recruit idiots and morons for the “muscle” end of the business. I expect cops to get stupider and stupider as statists and authority fetishists gain more ground in our system.

    1. Remember the discussion here a few weeks ago about how it seems like more and more pigs are looking like bloated Mafia soldiers? Yeah.

      1. “Da bawss asks me to push a button a a guy, I push a button, knowudimean, Senatah?”

    2. The military has a system in place for that. Is expecting local police depts. to do the same asking too much of our overlords?

      I wouldn’t object if they spent an entire day of the police academy teaching recruits the difference between “E” and “G”.

  4. “He never said I’m sorry, never apologized for having the wrong house,”

    Being above the law means never having to apologize.

  5. As always, I assume that “ongoing investigation” means “We’ll drag this out until people forget about it, then we’ll drop it”

  6. That’ll teach her to unwittingly live near criminals!

    ~PoliceDerp

    1. You aren’t fooling me! You copied that directly from the PoliceOne comments, didn’t you?!

  7. No drugs were found in Hunter’s home, but her address is the one that appeared on the warrant. A woman in the house where the arrest was made suggested someone mixed up Apartments E and G, the two that cops visited.

    Any defense lawyer worthy of the title is going to have a field day with this.

    1. Sure, if the warrant specified her address, then the address where they found the drugs wasn’t specified on the warrant, so unlawful search.

  8. “He never said I’m sorry, never apologized for having the wrong house,” she told WTVR. “He said you got to get someone to fix that door.”

    Tupla should be along, much later, to tell this ingrate how lucky she is to have a police department actually show up to her door.

    1. Tulpa still makes appearances? I would expect full time sock now days.

  9. George Carlin was right – bad news IS more interesting when it happens near where you live!

  10. Cops break locks and doors at every available opportunity. They say it is for their safety, but I wonder. Because they leave behind an unlocked abode, ready to be looted once they leave. Kinda like how they gratuitously smash everything in a home when they search it. It’s almost as if they do these things as a show of power. Nah. They’re selfless public servants. They’d never hurt people just because they can. Would they?

  11. That uppity bitch got what was coming to her. Pay attention to the backstory, you kneejerk haters.

  12. Considering the totality of the circumstances, I’d say this assault and violation of her liberties by the state was entirely merited.

    /Clarence Thomas

  13. Look at the bright side. They didn’t gun her down and plant evidence to cover their asses. Progress!

  14. Ignoring for the moment that this was about drugs (pretend that it was about something else), those who issue and execute warrants are only human, and are going to make mistakes. That said, once they realized they were mistaken, they should have released her, apologized, and paid for the broken door.

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