Police Abuse

Brickbat: Open Wide

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In Reading, Pennsylvania, a private company with the help of local police pulled over motorists to ask questions about their driving habits and request they allow them to swab the inside of their mouths. Officials say the company was hired by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. They also claim the checkpoints were voluntary. But one motorist says he was detained five minutes and had to repeatedly refuse to answer questions before he was allowed to leave.

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  1. Wasn’t there a longer article about this a few months ago on this very website?

    1. I thought that was about a different incident. Maybe in Texas?

      1. I thought it was PA…either way, same MO

      2. It was Fort Worth, TX. I remember because I thought about the Gamboler.

        1. There was also a maryland incident. thrice is no coincidence.

          1. If I saw that I likely filed that under FUMD. My experience there was worse than CA.

  2. Wow thats messed up man, like seriously.

    http://www.BeinAnon.tk

  3. He said he wasn’t told what the swab was for, but added, “Clearly it was for DNA.”

    More likely for intimidation.

    City Police Chief William M. Heim said the two federal agencies are trying to see what can be done about crashes and injuries

    How about reducing the risk of rear-end collisions by eliminating “voluntary” checkpoints?

    [Heim said] the swabs were not to get DNA samples but to test for the presence of prescription drugs.

    What, no urine or blood samples?

    1. Next time.

      1. Colonoscopy. That’s the leading edge of law enforcement.

  4. City Police Chief William M. Heim said the two federal agencies are trying to see what can be done about crashes and injuries

    Something tells me the historical record will reveal ZERO crashes or injuries in the locations selected for these roadblocks.

    If these geniuses were truly interested in highway safety, they would be spending their money on improved striping, signage and lighting.

    1. If these geniuses were truly interested in highway safety, they would be spending their money on improved striping, signage and lighting.

      Most accidents either come from extremely inclement weather and/or distracted driver. I include “drunk” driver in distracted driving.

      There’s nothing that -can- be done about “accidents,” they’re called that for a reason. Even when we have fully automated vehicles, something will break and accidents will occur.

    1. Well that seems like a catch-22.

      “His show of apparent lawful authority (flashing lights, uniform, badge, and gun) intimidated defendant and made him feel compelled to wait outside his car for 45 minutes until WPD arrived,” Judge Cobb found.

      The appellate panel rejected this reasoning, arguing that rental cops are not bound by such restrictions.

      “A traffic stop conducted entirely by a nonstate actor is not subject to reasonable suspicion because the Fourth Amendment does not apply,” Judge Rick Elmore wrote for the appellate panel.

      So does that mean I can tell the non-state actor to fuck off if he pulls me over ? And then drive away without getting shot ?

      Also this:

      Qualifying for the security guard position requires four hours of classroom instruction and a day on the range.

      So literally twice as much time shooting as classroom training. That doesn’t make me feel secure.

      1. “A traffic stop conducted entirely by a nonstate actor is not subject to reasonable suspicion because the Fourth Amendment does not apply,” Judge Rick Elmore wrote for the appellate panel.

        A nonstate actor hired by and working at the behest of the state is not a nonstate actor. Jesus Christ.

        But let’s go with that reasoning. A traffic stop by a nonstate actor on a public roadway is, or should be, false arrest and unlawful detention.

        1. And something about impersonating a peace officer.

  5. Most accidents either come from extremely inclement weather and/or distracted driver.

    Poorly marked roads with blocked lines of sight are a huge distraction to people unfamiliar with them.

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