Surveillance

DEA Phone Database Eclipses NSA Efforts

Working with AT&T to access phone data going back to 1987

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For at least six years, law enforcement officials working on a counternarcotics program have had routine access, using subpoenas, to an enormous AT&T database that contains the records of decades of Americans' phone calls — parallel to but covering a far longer time than the National Security Agency's hotly disputed collection of phone call logs.

The Hemisphere Project, a partnership between federal and local drug officials and AT&T that has not previously been reported, involves an extremely close association between the government and the telecommunications giant.

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  1. Fuck! There is literally no end to the shenanigans of these spooks.

    Oh, and Free Marc Emery!

    1. Total fucking assholes, but we already knew that. I remember when the the douche-bag drug-czar at the time spoke in Vancouver and Marc and his buddies bought a table and heckled him relentlessly, priceless. I admit Marc was bit of a flake but at least he had the balls to always take the fight right to the bastards.

      1. Ein Volk, ein AT&T!
        Sieg Heil!
        Heil, mein F?hrer!
        Heil Obama!
        Heil Government Almighty!

  2. I work at Home with Google. It’s by-far the nicest job I have had. I’ve made $64,000 so far this year working online and I’m a full time student. I’ve made such great money. It’s really user friendly and I’m just so happy that I found out about it. Here is what I do, http://www.Bling6.com

  3. So, if an arrest and conviction were made using this program and the information was not shared with the defense in the discovery process, wouldn’t that be grounds for throwing out the conviction or at the very least a mistrial?

    1. The text of the Constitution has been replaced:
      We, the Government of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Administration …

    2. We already know DEA has an SOP in place for concealing the source of illegally obtained evidence from NSA. A similar process has probably been in use for this program.
      How the hell do these people sleep at night? Are they that invested in the “drugs are evil” mindset that they can excuse *any* violation in pursuit of their goal?

  4. And something tells me the American public in general isn’t going to be bothered by this. I mean, we’re only dealing with druggies here, right? Just like the entire “terrorist” information gathering operations; only TERRORISTS need to worry, right?

    When is Uncle Sam going to get blue balls cause he sure as hell is slammin our asses pretty good?

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