Boston Marathon Bombing

Boston Bombing Shocker: Naturalized Citizens Identify with Home Countries!

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Hat tip: Instapundit.

In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, now presumed to have been orchestrated and carried out by people originally born in Chechnya, anti-immigration commentators are calling for a stop to anything resembling immigration reform.

Here's Stanley Kurtz at National Review Online in a piece called "Boston and Immigration Reform: Yes, It's Relevant." While granting that "the number of immigrants who might someday turn into terrorists is small," Kurtz argues that the Boston case underscores the rotten core at the heart of contemporary immigration:

Thanks to the rise of multiculturalism and bilingualism in the United States, our assimilation system now suffers from the same flaws as its European counterpart. The proposed immigration bill does little to fix this, and if anything aggravates an already critical situation….

Terrorism is only an extreme symptom of a far larger problem. A massive new wave of only superficially assimilated citizens would undercut the shared civic beliefs that have long held America together. On top of that, the new wave of Republican support for immigration reform assumes a pattern of assimilation that is no longer typical of this country.

So the Boston bombings are a wake-up call that ought to place the broader issue of assimilation at the center of our immigration debate.

Kurtz—and anti-immigration conservatives—are hardly alone. Indeed, Kurtz high-fives the Washington Post's Anne Applebaum for writing a column titled "The connection between Boston and Europe's train bombers," in which Applebaum speculates that the Tsarnaev brothers "closely resemble…the second-generation European Muslims" who turn violent against their adopted homelands.

Kurtz points to a new Hudson Institute report on immigrant attitudes that says "America's Patriotic Assimilation System is Broken" and argues "there can be no comprehensive immigration reform without comprehensive assimilation reform" (emphasis in original). The report is interesting to read through and documents that more native-born Americans than new citizens know that Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence and think that learning English is "very important for the future of the American political system." The authors also make great hay over the fact that, according to a 2007 Harris Interactive poll of 2,421 Americans commissioned by one of the authors, native-born Americans are far more likely to see themselves as a "citizen of the U.S." than as a "citizen of the world." Imagine that! Here was the question they were asked:

Do you think of yourself more as: A citizen of the United States; A citizen of the world; Not sure.

About 85 percent of native-born Americans picked the U.S., with 12 percent choosing the world, and about 4 percent saying "not sure." For naturalized citizens, the responses were 54 percent, 29 percent, and 17 percent. The Hudson study also reports (but doesn't linger) on this finding that naturalized citizens are more proud of "being American" than natives, other than to note that "a larger percentage of native-born respondents are 'very proud' to be Americans." Hmm.

In any case, the Hudson study isn't yoking recent terrorist attacks—about which very little is known, including the motivations of the bombers—to comprehensive immigration reform, which is mostly about figuring out how to create a system that doesn't yield 10 million to 12 million living illegally in the country. No, leave that to long-time immigration restrictionists at places such as National Review. Kurtz cites in passing the former British editor of NR, John O'Sullivan, who published a series of increasingly strident anti-immigration screeds throughout the 1990s by Peter Brimelow, the founder of Vdare.com, a site as dedicated to an "immigration moratorium now" as it is to defending the "beautiful face" of Miss Heather Locklear. And to folks at the Washington Post. What strange company. 

To say immigration—much less immigration reform, especially policies that actually bring legal processes in line with demonstrated demand—is controversial is to state the obvious.

So is the sadly lightning-fast willingness to link any news event—including a horrifying act such as the Boston Marathon bombing—to basically irrelevant yet longstanding policy obsessions. If the Tsarnaev brothers had snapped after sneaking across the border from Mexico and picking strawberries in California for a decade, their case might (might) bear some weight on talks about how to reform immigration writ large. But as it stands—and in this, I'm sure most NR contributors and readers would agree—their actions bear about as much relevance to immigration policy as Adam Lanza's do to gun control debates.

Reason on Immigration.

And as long as we're talking about immigration, check out Reason's latest ebook, Humane and Pro-Growth: a Reason Guide to Immigration Reform," which is edited by Shikha Dalmia and contains a wide-ranging, data-rich collection of articles, graphics, and columns on how to fix immigration policy in a way will be a boon to immigrants, Americans, and the economy.

Buy the Kindle version for just $2.99.

And buy the Nook version here.

Update: Via the Twitter feed of @ConnCarroll comes this Hill story in which anti- and pro-immigration reform members of the Senate argue that the Boston bombing perfectly proves their longstanding views.

NEXT: Tuareg Rebels and Arab Militants Fight in Town Near Timbuktu

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  1. Making English the official language will protect us from any of the various religions of peace.

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  2. a stop to anything resembling immigration reform.

    I’d wait to see what the “immigration reform” proposal is before blindly supporting it. If it contains e-verify I’m against it.
    Is reason going to follow Cato’s lead and support whatever “bi-partisan comprehensive immigration reform” proposal comes out of the US Senate?

    1. You don’t want them to pass it to see what is in it?

    2. Cato rocked before it went to Washington. I wonder what happened to them.

      1. The Kochtopus shortened the leashes that it was holding.

    3. Odd, the last CATO panel on immigration I listened to was pretty stridently against eVerify. Even talking about all the perils and problems with the system.

      No true Scotsman and all that I guess.

      1. SF’d the link. Try this one

        or if that doesn’t work http://www.cato.org/events/e-verifys-many-perils

    4. Is reason going to follow Cato’s lead and support whatever “bi-partisan comprehensive immigration reform” proposal comes out of the US Senate?

      Got a cite?

      Cato’s immigration page doesn’t reference anything of the sort.

  3. Culture matters and diversity kills. Goat herders from Central Asia do not belong in the United States.

    1. Did you think the same about naked bog trotters from Ireland or dirt scratching peasants from Germany or sharecroppers from Sicily?

      1. Yes. My ancestors, the clothed bog trotters left Ireland to get away from those who shuned functional garmentry. Then somehow crossed with the English to produce me – A heretical halfbreed of Anglo-Irish. I can have no home but America, for anywhere else it would be torches and pitchforks for being such an abomination.

        As for those other lot, I still can’t fathom why they left their home country.

      2. People used to come to America to get away from their crappy countries and make a fresh start here.

        A lot of immigrants seem to have lost that idea.

        Or as a great man recently put it:

        “What’s behind it?? — They are losers unable to settle themselves and hating everyone who did.

        The problem is that a large number of people in America, especially in academia, actively encourage retaining and inflaming ancient hatreds.

        1. A lot of immigrants seem to have lost that idea.

          We sure. Of course. That’s obvious. “A lot”.

          I love it when people make shit up like this.

          1. Empowerment by being a victim of some imaginary slight is mainstream in America.

      3. I’m the proud descendant of Irish bog trotters and Sicilian sharecroppers.

        And since I’m a libertarian, this is all the proof you need of the failure of open borders.

    2. Goat herders from Central Asia

      Chechnya is heavily wooded and not very suitable for goats. But don’t let me stop you; your mouth-breathing ignorance is charming.

    3. To whatever extent people represent a legitimate security threat, that is the extent to which they don’t belong in the United States.

      Cultures simply don’t represent a security threat. It’s amazing how many people on the right start sounding exactly like the progs on the left, sometimes.

      What is it about their culture, specifically, that makes them so dangerous? Aren’t they feminist enough for you? Is it because they aren’t as thoroughly comfortable with LGBTQ as you are?

      What are you, a liberal now?

      Adam Lanza was dangerous because of what he did–not because of his culture. And seeing the right “never let a crisis go to waste” for one of their pet issues is no better than seeing Obama “never let a crisis go to waste” for gun control.

      1. Cultures simply don’t represent a security threat. It’s amazing how many people on the right start sounding exactly like the progs on the left, sometimes.

        Not really. The only true difference between “the Right” and “the Left” is which groups of people and which activities they want to use the state to control. There is no argument that it is the state’s job to control people and activity.

    4. Hey!

    1. I’ll see your Hitler and raise you one

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhbV06V1yQo

  4. “If the Tsarnaev brothers had snapped after sneaking across the border from Mexico and picking strawberries in California for a decade”

    Heck, I am ready to snap after trying to grow the damned things for one year.

    1. Really? I planted strawberries and they tried to take over the whole garden. The challenge is trying to stop the birds from eating them before I do.

    2. Strawberries, or Mexicans?

      1. Straw Mexicans – there’s a great market for them during every debate on immigration. But growing them is a mite difficult.

        1. Well, obviously, if Chechen immigrants set off a bomb in Boston, then that means we have to hold up a bill that mostly effects Mexicans and Central Americans.

          I suppose it’s an especially good thing Hugo Chavez is already dead becasue if he wasn’t, as a response to Chechen terrorism at the Boston Marathon, people on the right might be advocating the invasion of Venezuela right now–just to complete the circle.

          1. Considering the relative number of Mexicans, there have been very few Mexican terrorist attacks in the US.

            Its like they want to be here or something.

            1. Unpossible! People who risk death crossing inhospitable desert and pay smugglers exhorbinant sums to cross the border in order to take menial, low paying jobs want to be where they’re going? I can’t believe that, they must be up to something.

            2. “In Chicago, Illinois, the cartels have even become the new kings. In the Windy City, the Chicago Crime Commission now considers Joaquin ‘El Chapo’ Guzman, the leader of the Sinaloa cartel, as Public Enemy No.1.

              ‘It’s probably the most serious threat the United States has faced from organized crime’ Jack Riley of the US Drug Enforcement Administration explains to the AP.

              Southern California, Texas and Arizona aren’t the new homes of these groups, either. Nine non-border states across the US now have a documented Mexican cartel presence, with the AP claiming that these collectives have expanded as far north as Pennsylvania, roughly 1,500 miles away.”
              http://rt.com/usa/drug-us-mexican-cartels-177/

          2. The ethnicity of the terrorists are less important than the fact that it’s easy to infiltrate (so to speak) this country and stay within pretty much any community of your choice with no fear of getting deported.

            The older brother was denied citizenship because he BEAT up his girlfriend. The FBI was contacted by another nation to check on him. But nothing was done, and he was able to radicalize his younger brother when he was allowed to travel to and from Russia to apparently receive training.

            In areas of So Cal there are entire hotels checked out by pregnant women from Asia who are waiting to give birth. There are apparently sections of the border where you can just waltz across freely. What can Mexico do if terrorist cells formed in one of their ghost towns?

            I don’t fear (mostly white) gun owners, because they bought their guns legally passing background checks. You can’t necessarily say that with undocumented aliens who can come from all corners of the earth. Given recent events (and that immigration isn’t a civil right), I would add additional security measures before rushing immigration reform.

  5. Americans of Southern Irish descent who have been in the country for three or four generations still identify with Sourhtern Ireland and supported terrorism against the UK.

    1. It’s difficult to not feel excluded when groups of Americans get together to celebrate their racial heritages. What about those of us whose ancestors interbred with all the various peoples here in the New World and the Old. The only thing we have to celebrate is our mutty-ness.

      1. We also celebrate our white privilege.

        1. My skin has a sort of grayish-green hue. As always, disenfranchised once again.

          1. Really? Can we give you a pre-emptive autopsy ‘FOR SCIENCE!’ ? There has to be a reason for such a significant deviance from “allowed” norms of coloration.

      2. And Flag Day. Also, Talk Like A Pirate Day.

        And, honestly, speaking as someone whose grandmother spoke with a thick Scottish accent, I identify with “Scottishness”, but I’m Murcan at the end of the day. I’m only marginally more connected to St. Patty’s than I am to Cinco de Maio, but I have no problem enjoying them both, despite not having a direct cultural or ethnic connection. The nice thing about being Murcan is that you get to sort of pick and choose what bits of a smorgasbord of cultures you’d like to take part in, without having to actually have ancestors from there.

        But I do tear up some Burn’s Day.

        1. We’re only two weeks past Tartan Day and you’ve already forgotten?

          And everybody gets to celebrate Cinco de Mayo because, hey, who doesn’t like to commemorate an imperial French ass-kicking?

        2. My birthday is June 14, so I celebrate that, and not Flag Day.

    2. “”Ted S.| 4.22.13 @ 9:13AM |#

      Americans of Southern Irish descent who have been in the country for three or four generations still identify with Sourhtern Ireland and supported terrorism against the UK.””

      also, retards are retarded. film at 11

  6. Mentioning multiculturalism touches on the real problem while masking it: Government schools. If we had free-market education this would cease being an issue.

    1. I am all for killing government schools. But I am not sure what you say is true. If we had true privatized schools, they might be even more insular.

      1. Yeah, it’s not as if private schools tend to be run by tough minded libertarians. The liberal PC crowd pretty much runs education, private and public.

      2. Yes, but 99% of parents want their kids to succeed in life. They won’t pay good money for a school that sucks.

        So the Catholics and Pastafarian kids may rarely mingle, and believe the most outlandish bullshit about each other, but the schools will be more focused on setting the kids up to succeed after they graduate.

        1. “They won’t pay good money for a school that sucks”? Don’t you mean that they might not want to pay their own money and so, instead, demand vouchers?

      3. Okay, restated: If this federal edict across the land to force multiculturalism into every government school were no longer possible, then this would cease to be an issue and would certainly be less widespread.

  7. Aren’t we dodging the real issue?

    Importing Muslims is a bad idea. They don’t assimilate well. Sorry.

    Christians, Jews, Buddhists, and Hindus are all far less likely to become terrorists.

    1. Christians, Jews, Buddhists, and Hindus are all far less likely to become terrorists.

      I don’t know about that.

      Fist of Etiquette| 4.22.13 @ 9:01AM |#

      Human Rights Watch says Buddhists are ethnically cleansing Muslims in Burma.

      AND ON EARTH DAY OF ALL DAYS???

      1. Oh yeah, the IRA called looking for domations. When I told them I wasn’t catholic, they mumbled something about ‘in the mail’. It was rather odd.

        1. You kid, but there’s an Irish bar in Baltimore near where I used to live that used to have a donation jar for Sinn Fein, as of about three years ago. Let’s just say there wasn’t any Bushmill’s in the joint, and, in a bad part of town, nobody messed with the patrons or the place.

          Also, non sequitur, you weren’t allowed to swear inside.

          1. I know, I kid about the “christians less likely to become terrorists” comment given that after controlling for power disparity in the dispute, faith disappears from the major factors in determining rate of terrorist generation.

    2. All human beings are extremely unlikely to become terrorists.

  8. The report is interesting to read through and documents that more native-born Americans than new citizens know that Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence

    Strange that so many people know something which is not true. While Jefferson does get credit for the DoI, he actually stole most of it from George Mason who had written the Virginia Declaration of Rights.

    From a Libertarian perspective, Mason’s right to “property” is far superior to Jefferson’s catch-all “pursuit of happiness”.

    1. IIRC Jefferson kept “property” in there until a bunch of the people debating it started freaking out that the DOI would put them on record as opposing slavery.

      It’s a shame that the radicals lost that battle to the more ‘reasonable’ guys.

      1. Jefferson kept “property” in there until a bunch of the people debating it started freaking out that the DOI would put them on record as opposing slavery.

        Interesting. I did not know that.

        It is a shame because the pursuit of happiness has been abused almost as much as “interstate commerce”.

        1. Well how on earth am I supposed to pursue happiness with only my own money and power?

          1. I’ll be your friend if the pay’s good.

          2. That explains why you use your feminine wiles to enslave burly men.

  9. Maybe extraordinary cases don’t reflect on the vast majority of people?

    1. Individualism? On a libertarian blog? Well, I never!

    2. No. That can’t be right.

  10. “Patriotism is supporting your country all the time and your government when it deserves it.”

    Mark Twain

    1. Mark Twain is my favorite dead atheist.

      1. Are you sure about that last word?

        He didnt seem to be very clear about it.

        1. Yes I am and sure he did. But if it makes you any happier, my favorite living atheist is Penn Jillette.

          1. If you’re sure about the term “atheist”, you have a pretty loose definition of it. Clemens plainly stated in Three Statements of the Eighties that he believed in an almighty God, but not in any revealed wisdom, or mysticism or scriptures, despite which he still regularly attended religious services during his lifetime. He was also a Freemason, one of the membership requirements of which is belief in a supreme being, which is a relatively loose requirement but was still generally enforced at the time.

  11. Despite the best efforts of the lefts multi-culturilism (anti-assimulation) bullshit, immigrants want to assimilate and do assimilate. It can’t be stopped. Hell even non-immigrants in other countries embrace American culture. Everyone wants to fit in.

  12. so how many of you are “proud to be American?”

    1. I’m glad to be an American. I feel lucky to be an American. Pride to me is a more personal thing. Something that I acheived through my own devices, not through cosmic luck, or the foresite of my ancestors.

      1. I guess that’s probably due to a more individualistic outlook as opposed to a collective outlook.

      2. I agree. Pride to me really isn’t the sort of thing one can feel about the whole country or one’s nationality.

    2. I support my country. Government? Not so much.

      1. Damn it, I said almost the exact same thing and you beat me to it.

    3. I’ve sometimes been ashamed of our leaders and what they’ve done, but I’ve always been proud to be American.

      I was even proud to be American when I lived in Mexico. When I lived in Mexico, I knew lots of American (and Canadian) expats who lived there, and they were all proud to be American (or Canadian), too.

      …even as they were working through the process to become legal permanent residents and/or Mexican citizens.

    4. I am. I just don’t like a lot of the management, nor having so much of it right now.

    5. I am proud to be an American. I am quite frequently ashamed and embarrassed about the fact that I am a citizen of the United States and a member of the human race.

      ‘America’ is a philosophy – a philosophy of the sovereign individual – not a geographic location or a political entity. There are plenty of Americans who don’t live in the United States – and one helluva lot of US citizens ain’t the least bit American.

    6. I am proud of the idea of America and the concept it represents.

      I’m not particularly proud of what Washington bureaucrats have transformed it into.

      1. The transformation is ongoing, and not a pretty one.

    7. Not really, I’m surrounded by idiots to the extent that people assume that I must be one myself. Especially given the sorts of people those idiots elect. I can’t be proud until we find a cure for the “we must do something” crowd and make sure no one else follows their lead paint chip-eating ways.

    8. I am.

      I love my country.

      My government, not so much.

  13. How much of the immigration ‘problem’ is the same old anti-whatever the latest big group of immigrants are and how much of it is a result of changing from welcoming whoever has the gumption to get here to allowing the government to pick and choose who is ‘good enough’ to immigrate? IOW – aren’t a larger percentage of (legal) immigrants now than in the past screened by the government to make sure they are the ‘right’ sort of people? Doesn’t it make you wonder what the government thinks is the ‘right’ sort of people?

    And I don’t mean they want radical Muslims, I mean they *don’t* want people who want nothing more than the chance to bust their ass to provide a better life for themselves and their families. Those sorts of people are too damn busy taking care of their own business to be sticking their noses in other peoples’ business, I suspect, and who wants more of that sort of person?

    1. “If a nation is a sovereign community of persons who have the right and human obligation to protect their common good, then they have the right and human obligation ? all the while being generous in their welcome ? to control the influx of persons into the community, so not excessively to disturb the community socially, culturally, economically, and environmentally.”
      Fr. Dominique Peridans

  14. “””If the Tsarnaev brothers had snapped after sneaking across the border from Mexico and picking strawberries in California for a decade, their case might (might) bear some weight on talks about how to reform immigration writ large. “””

    This does not even make sense. They are immigrants and so they do weight on talks about how to reform immigration. Immigration is not just about illegal Mexicans.

    Its also about our corrupt refugee polices which allow people to come to the US as long as they make claims to be persecuted in their home country. False claims as shown by the fact that the mother and father fled back to their homeland when the mother was caught shop lifting. They did not fear their homeland when they found that crime did not pay in the USA.

    1. And if anyone bothered to read the 844 pages plus other references in the new immigration bill they will find plenty that does not have to do with Mexican strawberry pickers but includes importing people from places where they don’t like Americans

      “”””Sec. 2317. Extension and improvement of the Iraqi special immigrant visa program.
      Sec. 2318. Extension and improvement of the Afghan special immigrant visa
      program.

      Subtitle D?Asylum and Refugee Provisions
      Sec. 3401. Time limits and efficient adjudication of genuine asylum claims.
      Sec. 3402. Refugee family protections.
      Sec. 3403. Clarification on designation of certain refugees.
      Sec. 3404. Asylum determination efficiency.
      Sec. 3405. Stateless persons in the United States.
      Sec. 3406. U visa accessibility.
      Sec. 3407. Representation at overseas refugee interviews.”””

      http://www.rubio.senate.gov/pu…..286495cf42

      1. And of course if we don’t import in Mexican strawberry pickers who is going to take out a mortgage with New Century Mortgage to buy $720,000 houses in California?

        http://www.sfgate.com/business…..601880.php

          1. “””Wut?””””

            The original article brings up the subject of Mexican strawberry pickers and I just pointed out how important they were as customers of the mortgage industry and the $700,000 home market in California.

            1. I’m not question you – just the insanity of someone with such a small income buying a $700k house. And being approved for such a loan.

      2. Didn’t we bring in boatloads of Vietnamese refugees? I don’t remember them causing any problems here.

        Seems there is some other factor to consider.

        1. Perhaps the term “boatloads” offers some clue.

          Whereas, from Chechnya but born in Kyrgyzistan and now living in Dagestan does not scream OPPRESSED BY RUSSIANS as much as “we moved around the former Soviet Union” for some reason.

    2. “This does not even make sense. They are immigrants and so they do weight on talks about how to reform immigration. Immigration is not just about illegal Mexicans.”

      But the suggestion that we can’t go through with immigration reform because some troubled Chechen and his gullible little brother set off a bomb in Boston is preposterous.

      I’d say you might have a point if you wanted to introduce a law prohibiting false claims of refugee status, but making false claims is already against the law.

      One instance of a woman fleeing back to her country after she was caught shoplifting sure as hell doesn’t mean that Chechen refugees weren’t really refugees.

      The people of Chechnya were subjected to so much brutality. Looking for people who had it worse, I suppose you could go with Rwanda or Kosovo. There’s no question in my mind but that tons of people from Chechnya deserved refugee status.

      1. “Looking for people who had it worse [since 1990]”, it was supposed to say.

      2. But they weren’t living in Chechnya. They lived in other parts of the old Soviet Union. And they did not go back to Chechnya they went to another part of Russia. They don’t seem to be in fear now, they are even suppose to have visited Chechnya.

        1. You want to claim they weren’t really persecuted people in this particular case, that’s one thing.

          We’re already not supposed to accept refugees who aren’t really refugees.

          You disagreeing with a judge’s ruling on one refugee’s case is certainly no reason to hold up immigration reform in Congress for all those people from Central America and Mexico.

          One of them involves a path to citizenship for people who’ve lived and worked here for decades. The other has to do with how judges rule in the cases of certain refugees.

          1. Its all part of the same huge bill so if you want to blame someone for the linkage then blame the Gang Of Eight. They did not want to have individual bills since that would put a spotlight on the system.

            Second there is a pathway for citizenship for people, between half and one million people become citizens of the US each year, that is more then the rest of the entire world allows as new citizens.

            And yes we must get those Mexican strawberry pickers into the US so they can buy $720,000 houses and restart the housing boom .

            1. “Second there is a pathway for citizenship for people, between half and one million people become citizens of the US each year, that is more then the rest of the entire world allows as new citizens.”

              This has nothing to do with the Boston Marathon. Seems like you want to use this terrorist attack as an excuse to derail immigration reform.

              Immigration reform is about giving people who are currently illegal a NEW clear path to citizenship. If you don’t want that, then argue against it on its own terms. No need to bring refugees or terrorism into it.

              1. No it is not, did you bother to look at the link to the bill I posted?

                Its a comprehensive immigration bill and covers all aspects including refugee’s. That is what the Gang of Eight has put forward, its not just about illegal aliens. If you have a problem with that then blame the Gang of Eight and all the comprehensive immigration bill supporters.

              2. He specifically shows that the bill included parts about refugees. I know this must go against your priors, but he’s right.

  15. Naturalized citizenship *can* be revoked.

    http://www.newcitizen.us/losing.html

    1. In all the ways to lose your citizenship “involuntarily”, it seems you’re required to do something of voluntarily.

      It’s more like, “If you do these things voluntarily, you can have your citizenship revoked.”

  16. Regarless of your opinion about immigration, you have to enjoy a bit of schadenfreude watching liberals scream in horror as the very same sort of emotional blackmail and sophistry they were using for gun control is now used on them in the immigration debate. It is a little hard to claim the Boston bombers are in no way relevant to the immigration debate when just two weeks ago you were claiming Adam Lanza decided the gun control debate.

    1. Shadenfreude is the main staple of my diet. I subsist mainly on delight at the suffering of others. I especially love it with a heaping helping of irony sauce.

      1. That is about all we have these days.

    2. Just this weekend I was talking to some Dem friends about the Boston thing. We were talking about how dangerous it is to make “terrorism” a password to abrogate a person’s Constitutional rights, and how it’s ridiculous to use one isolated instance to characterize an entire group of people, and especially awful to use a tragedy to influence legislation that would affect otherwise law-abiding people. Once I got them to stipulate to those points, I introduced the concept of the “hate crime” and the wonders of recently-proposed gun legislation. It was awesome, like jujitsu. I think one of them turned.

      1. 150 million more to go. Good luck.

        p.s. the moment you left the room, the rest of them forced the traitor to recant.

  17. However much they may say they identify with their new countries, a lot of immigrants are still dangerously backwards and stuck in their old countries’ culture, and have no intention of actually assimilating. My entire extended family friends would superficially seem naturalized, but they’re still a bunch of racist anti-semites.

    1. Maybe they have assimilated into good old American racists anti-Semites?

    2. My entire extended family friends would superficially seem naturalized, but they’re still a bunch of racist anti-semites.

      You realize there are a bunch of native born people who fit that description as well, right?

      1. Not in New Jersey. Not to mention they’d never even seen black people before they came here. How much of a hateful asshole do you have to be to move to a new country and start hating people you’ve never seen?

        To simplify it, they’re like Khan from King Of The Hill. Like, that’s not even much of an exagguration. They’re freaking weird eccentric people with personalities like root canals

        1. Not to mention they’d never even seen black people before they came here.

          So they are from North Dakota?

      2. But our racism is so mild in this country compared to the rest of the world. The typical European, Asian or Middle Eastern racist is worst than the most backward racist American. America really is a polite and peaceful society compared to the rest of the world.

        1. That is so true. Unfortunately in bizarro world the opposite picture gets painted. I see tolerence everywhere here.

  18. Via the Twitter feed of @ConnCarroll comes this Hill story in which anti- and pro-immigration reform members of the Senate argue that the Boston bombing perfectly proves their longstanding views.

    “Everything which happens in the world may be used to prove prove my theory is correct!”

  19. The more of these immigration threads I read, the more I realize what an outlier I apparently am.

    DO

    NOT

    CARE.

    1. You are not the only one. I am more tired of immigration debates than I am of gay marriage debates.

  20. “CHARLIE ROSE: And immigration has been America’s strength?
    LEE KUAN YEW: Absolutely. But mind you, immigration of the highly intelligent and highly-hard working, very hard working people. If you get immigration of the fruit pickers, you may not get very far.
    (LAUGHTER)
    CHARLIE ROSE: [changes subject]”

  21. Americans who say they don’t object to immigration should have something against immigration. It threatens the American way of life, has changed it dramatically already, and not in a good way. Do you realize that since 1970, immigration alone has accounted for nearly all population growth in the US? That’s a 50% increase in population, just from this one bad policy. Granted, immigrants have contributed in positive ways too, but there are negatives and positives for all things, and adding 100M people to the population has been a disaster for the living standards of this country, for the quality of life. Labor has become commoditized. The effects are not just social, cultural, and economic: this hyper-immigration has been environmentally destructive as well. Urban sprawl, high density, pollution, traffic congestion, over-burdened infrastructure, all take an enormous toll on the environment.

    1. “Urban sprawl” should be pinned on immigrants?? Perhaps you should get to know the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways a little better. And what about the environmental impact of stimulating passenger airline service by subsidizing the construction and maintenance of airports?

      There are lots of other problems, too, caused by the usual suspects in legislatures and other branches of government acting at the behest of people who aren’t immigrants. Those troublemakers do far more to shape the culture and civilization than you have the gumption to suspect.

      At any rate, “the American way of life” can and should be threatened, for ’tis evil. But you need not worry about immigrants offering much help. I live in a very big northern city with lots of immigrants, and even immigrants hostile to “the American way of life”, whatever that means, tend to be comically naive about how things work in Publius’ America. In this respect, at least, immigrants have assimilated fully with oblivious natives such as this year’s crop of go-getters headed for American investment banks.

  22. my classmate’s step-mother makes $72/hr on the internet. She has been without work for 7 months but last month her pay check was $14701 just working on the internet for a few hours. Read more on this site http://www.wow92.com

  23. …comprehensive immigration reform, which is mostly about figuring out how to create a system that doesn’t yield 10 million to 12 million living illegally in the country.

    What about the current “comprehensive reform” proposal would “create a system that doesn’t yield 10 to 12 million living illegally in the country”? The reason why there’s that many immigrants here illegally is because there’s a massive black market in labor, caused primarily by the crushing market distortions from the minimum wage and regulatory compliance cost. As soon as those 10 to 12 million are amnestied they completely lose their utility from the perspective of their employers, and another 10 to 12 million illegal immigrants will be needed to replace them. Not one fucking tittle of the current proposed law does ANYTHING to address those issues – the actual underlying CAUSE for the illegal immigration in the first place. It addresses a symptom of the underlying problem, and does it poorly. Support the law for humanitarian Reasons to prove how much you love brown people and their uniquely authentic culture that only touches you when Julio comes up to unclog the shitters on your 50th floor apartment, but for the love of fuck quit trying to pretend that it addresses ANYTHING that is wrong with our immigration system.

    1. Yes, I also wonder about this. I also worry about who will be welcoming these people “out of the shadows.” I’m guessing ACORN 2.0, with all the forms needed to “get the help these people need.”

  24. All we need to ‘assimilate’ people is a true free market system and a lot less government. Allow some space for American culture to thrive instead of allowing the government to parce culture into what amounts to ethnic reservations and caste systems.

  25. until I looked at the paycheck ov $7310, I didnt believe that my neighbour was like they say truly bringing in money in their spare time at there computar.. there best friend has done this for only about nine months and recently took care of the morgage on there cottage and bourt themselves a Lotus Elan. go to, http://www.app70.com

  26. If you think Rachel`s story is nice, , 3 weeks ago my aunties neighbour basically broght in $5518 workin twelve hour’s a week from their apartment and the’re co-worker’s sister`s neighbour has been doing this for three months and got a cheque for more than $5518 in their spare time on their mac. apply the guide on this address, http://www.app70.com

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