Nonprofits

A Guide to Joseph Kony and the Backlash Against Invisible Children

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Joseph Kony is going viral.

Joseph Kony, LRA Uganda

The brutal leader of the eastern African Lord's Resistance Army (L.R.A.), Kony is the subject of a 30-min documentary created by Invisible Children, an advocacy group. Released on March 5, Kony 2012 has already topped over 52 million views on YouTube. A number of celebrities like Oprah, Justin Bieber and Rihanna, have tweeted support, while "Invisible Children," "Uganda," "#makekonyfamous," and "#stopkony" have been trending on Twitter over the past couple days.

According to Jason Russell, the co-founder of Invisble Children who narrates the movie, Kony 2012

aims to make Joseph Kony famous, not to celebrate him, but to raise support for his arrest and set a precedent for international justice. In this case, notoriety translates to public support. If people know about the crimes that Kony has been committing for 26 years, they will unite to stop him.

Since the late 1980s, the L.R.A. has abducted 30,000 children to form its militias. As a result of this violence, over 1.7 million people have been displaced.

But the video has sparked a firestorm of controversy. Invisible Children has been accused of lacking financial transparency. Allegedly, only one-third of its revenue funds direct services. Since the documentary emphasizes American involvement, several activists argue it perpetuates neo-colonialism and a 21st Century version of "the White Man's Burden." VICE also blasted the group for being "staffed by douchebags." Invisible Children has responded to many of these critiques.

Nevertheless, the video greatly simplifies what's going on in eastern Africa. It focuses far more on how to spread its message than actually informing viewers about the complex politics between the L.R.A. and the nations fighting against it.

"Kony 2012" contains surprisingly very little biographical information about Joseph Kony. For whatever reason, the movie barely delves into how delusional (and Christianist) Kony is. Fortunately, Christoper Hitchens covered him in much more depth in a 2006 article for Vanity Fair:

Kony grew up in a Gulu Province village called Odek. He appointed himself the Lord's anointed prophet for the Acholi people of northern Uganda in 1987, and by the mid-90s was receiving arms and cash from Sudan. He probably suffers from multiple-personality disorder, and he takes his dreams for prophecies. He goes into trances in which he speaks into a tape recorder and plays back the resulting words as commands. He has helped himself to about 50 captives as "wives," claiming Old Testament authority for this (King Solomon had 700 spouses), often insisting—partly for biblical reasons and partly for the more banal reason of AIDS dread—that they be virgins. He used to anoint his followers with a holy oil mashed from indigenous shea-butter nuts, and now uses "holy water," which he tells his little disciples will make them invulnerable to bullets. He has claimed to be able to turn stones into hand grenades, and many of his devotees say that they have seen him do it. He warns any child tempted to run away that the baptismal fluids are visible to him forever and thus they can always be found again.

According to Francis Ongom, a former L.R.A. officer who defected, Kony "has found Bible justifications for killing witches, for killing pigs because of the story of the Gadarene swine, and for killing people because god did the same with Noah's flood and Sodom and Gomorrah."

While precise numbers are hard to come by, the UN's Stabilisation Mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO) believes there are only 200 L.R.A. fighters left, based mostly in the neighboring Central African Republic. But despite these small numbers, the L.R.A. has killed more than 2,400 civilians and displaced 400,000 people since 2008.

Perhaps most galling, "Kony 2012" completely fails to mention the brutality of the nations who fight against the L.R.A. Recently elected to his fourth term, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has been in power for over 25 years. Human Rights Watch claims the Museveni administration engages in severe human rights abuses, like illegal detention, torture, even extrajudicial killings (like another president). Visiting northern Uganda, Museveni even vowed he would defeat the L.R.A. in "just one week." That was in 2003. Even more alarming, Museveni has been accused of kidnapping children and turning them into child soldiers, using the same tactics as the L.R.A.

Meanwhile, the Central African Republic (CAR) has been labelled "beyond a failed state" by The Economist, and is plagued by rebellions, rampant kidnapping, and brutal counterinsurgency tactics. One former leader of CAR was even accused of cannibalism. In addition, over 5.4 million have been killed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since 1996, even though Congo's war officially ended in 2003. Clearly, none of these nations can be considered a hero or the "good guys" against Kony.

Yet the United States has been coordinating with these nations. To stop the L.R.A., President Obama deployed 100 military personnel to the region in October 2011. Their main priorities are to advise and assist with intelligence gathering. While these soldiers are "combat-equipped," "they will not themselves engage LRA forces unless necessary for self defense." Many media reports only mentioned they were dispatched to Uganda; in reality, they have been operating in four countries: Uganda, Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and South Sudan.

Machine Gun Preacher poster

KONY 2012 praises the advisors (21:40) as essential to apprehend Kony, and thwart the L.R.A.:

We know what to do. Here it is, ready? In order for Kony to be arrested this year, the Ugandan military has to find him. In order to find him, they need the technology and training to track him in the vast jungle. That's where the American advisors come in. But in order for the American advisors to be there, the U.S. government has to deploy them. They've done that, but if the government doesn't believe the people care about arresting Kony, the mission will be cancelled. In order for the people to care, they have to know. And they will only know if Kony's name is everywhere.

Yet in a letter written to President Obama on March 7, Invisible Children conceded, "…no serious gains have been made in reducing the LRA's threat to civilians in the months since the advisors were deployed." This statement was quickly qualified:

reports from LRA defectors – and data showing a marked decrease in LRA attacks in the second half of 2011 – indicate that heightened U.S. and international interest may nonetheless be deterring the group from committing large-scale attacks.

But according to a press statement by Karl Wycoff, a senior official with the State Department, "While these numbers represent an encouraging drop from previous years…they do not mean the group's capacity to wreak havoc has been diminished."

In addition, Mareike Schomerus, a researcher at the London School of Economics, argues:

It doesn't tell us anything because it's the same thing they have been doing for the last 25 years. They tend to attack more when they're under military pressure and military pressure has been increasing in the last few months, since October especially.

But this isn't the first time the U.S. has tried to stop Kony. Back in December 2008, the United States, along with Ugandan and Congolese soldiers, coordinated a mission to kill Kony, Operation Lightning Thunder. Writing in Foreign Policy, Michael Wilkerson, a journalist who's covered Uganda, described how the operation became a debacle:

At the last minute, helicopter gunships (which can be heard five minutes away) were substituted for quiet fighter jets, officially due to bad weather (though the revelation last week that Uganda is shopping for new jets suggests faulty equipment could have been the culprit). To make matters worse, the Ugandan ground forces that were supposed to catch escaping LRA members arrived a full 72 hours late, bizarrely underestimating the time it would take them to move on foot through dense jungle. And Congolese troops that were supposed to protect nearby villages never showed up. So while some rebels were captured or killed by the helicopter force, the escaping LRA fighters went on a vengeful spree, killing more than 800 civilians as they pillaged virtually every village on their way to the Central African Republic.

Placing ground forces on eastern African soil has already escalated the fight against the L.R.A. The movie shies away from Operation Lightning Thunder as well as the policy implications for Obama's deployment decision: if these 100 advisors fail to stop Kony, what's the next step for the United States? More advisors? Drone strikes? Selling weapons to Uganda et al.? And what happens if Kony is arrested, but the L.R.A. continues to fight on?

While Invisible Children has noble intentions to bring justice and closure for those victimized by the L.R.A., Kony 2012 could have a similar fate to another botched advocacy campaign in eastern Africa. In 2010, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank financial regulation act. Thanks to activists, the law included a provision that forces companies in the United States to disclose where they obtained their metals and minerals in the Congo. The Economist explains the motivation:

The intention behind the law was good. Congolese militias and rogue army units, whose members rape and murder with abandon, finance themselves through mining and extortion from miners. The law tries to shame big buyers, such as Apple and Motorola, who use Congolese coltan, into dealing only with bona fide suppliers. But the effect has been to frighten them away from Congo altogether.

As a result, the disclosure requirement became a de facto embargo on Congolese mining. This has been disastrous for that nation's already troubled economy. Some Congolese mines have seen output plummet by 95 percent, while anywhere from tens of thousands to upwards of two million Congolese miners have lost their jobs. Meanwhile, militia leaders have formed smuggling networks and bribed officials to bypass the disclosure requirement. In addition, since American demand has dropped, morally flexible Chinese firms have invested heavily in these mines, obtaining commodities at huge discounts.

Sometimes, doing nothing is better than doing something.

Reason contributors Gene Healy and Judge Andrew Napolitano on the L.R.A.

NEXT: With 12 Beholders, You Just Need One to Say It Might Be Art

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  1. Hitchens, still taking care of business from beyond the grave.

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  2. Islam is the only violent religion; nobody in the modern world does anything evil in the name of christianity!

    1. Yes but this fellow isn’t a REAL christian, so he doesn’t count! All the billions of Muslims who aren’t actively out there murdering people are just biding their time!

    2. OW! OUCH! FUCK!!!

      1. Yep, nobody ever says that in islam-related threads. Never happens. If I get time later I’ll dig up 50 or so examples for you.

        1. Islam is the only violent religion; nobody in the modern world does anything evil in the name of christianity!

          Yep, nobody ever says that in islam-related threads. Never happens. If I get time later I’ll dig up 50 or so examples for you.

          I’ll wait to see 50 examples of this. Or even one or two.

          1. Hell I can quote myself from last week.

            EDG reppin’ LBC|3.3.12 @ 5:33PM|#|show direct|ignore
            Muslims should stop with the “Religion of Peace” bullshit, and take an inventory of their membership. Those who believe it is the “Religion of Peace” need to get to work right fucking now and purge violent members from the mainstream. If they are unable to do so, I recommend a reformation, or consider finding a new religion.

            I guess my frustration is that I can tell the difference between the little Christian church down my street from the “Christinity” of the LRA. If a muslim were to ask me about it, I would be able to explain those differences in very explicit terms. Unfortunately, I don’t see that type of explicit condemnation. Instead it reverts to “Religion of Peace” as if that settles it. I am however, open to learning more.

          2. My thanks to EDG reppin’ LBC, because I was going to have to be the first to stand up for AA (anonymous asshole). I do see comments like that on here in Islam/terrorism threads. I wouldn’t say they’re “typical”, but certainly far from uncommon.

            1. The contention had 2 parts, the second being: “nobody in the modern world does anything evil in the name of christianity!”

              So yeah, still waiting.

    3. Furthermore, we should buy Kony nuclear weapons. Who are we, a nation of fat, blood soaked, warmongering ice-people, to stand in the way of his dreams?

      1. Get out the China, I’m Hungary for Turkey.

        1. Haha Uruguay! LOL!

    4. Speaking of Islam…

      He goes into trances in which he speaks into a tape recorder and plays back the resulting words as commands.

      Didn’t Mohammed do something similar to create the Koran (without the tape of course)?

      1. isn’t it pretty much how all religions generate content?

        1. Joseph Smith didn’t need to go into a trance, God provided him with super secret spectacle and seer stones.

          1. Joseph Smith’s kung-fu is stronger than Mohammed’s, it would seem.

            1. Moroni could totally kick Gabriel’s butt.

              1. That may be, but Michael would so totally waste him.

  3. As a result, the disclosure requirement became a de facto embargo on Congolese mining.

    Consequences. Foreseeable. How does that go again?

    1. Consequences. Foreseeable. How does that go again?

      Let me be clear. Foreseeable consequences are the fault of an adversarial Republican Congress.

      1. After all, it is only due to the failures of the Bush administration that we need to intervene in the first place.

    2. How many times has this scenario played out exactly the same way? When will folks get the message? Or have they already got it and care more about looking compassionate than actually helping?

      1. We have a winner. Do you want the kewpie doll, or to be violently raped by a UN “peacekeeper”?

        1. Rape! Take the rape! Yeah, go for the rape!

          1. {sends resume in to UN}

    1. I think this goes even beyond tl;dr into wtfl;dbtr territory.

  4. This is all very interesting, and it makes me want to go play FarCry 2 again.

  5. Sometimes, doing nothing is better than doing something.

    In government, it’s the vast majority of the time.

  6. At the last minute, helicopter gunships (which can be heard five minutes away) were substituted for quiet fighter jets,

    Quiet fighter jet engines? Really? Should we assume the rest is just as credible?

    1. the jets move faster than the speed of sound, i presume.

    2. The lag time between hearing an fighter and getting shot up might be a lot shorter than it is with choppers.

      Still, five minutes warning and the attack is ruined? That’s some top-notch guerrillatating by the Konoids.

      1. Send over some A-10s. That’ll learn the LRA. If you hear that big gun fire, that means they missed you.

      2. RC is correct. Basically, by the time you hear the jet airplane it’s too late.

        Wylie, I haven’t researched this but it seems unlikely that Uganda or any of the other countries involved have supersonic fighters. More like 80’s era US or Soviet hand-me-downs, if they’re lucky.

        1. yeah, I didn’t take the time to consider just traveling closer to the SoS, which enhances the deadliness plenty.

        2. MiG 21/23, SU-30 according to Wikipedia. All supersonic.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uganda_People‘s_Defence_Force#UPDF_Air_Wing

        3. Damn…they’re coming up in the world.

          1. I wouldn’t term a reliance on 50 year old technology “coming up in the world.” I’d consider it more notable if they didn’t have supersonic jets; it’s pretty much all that’s been made since Korea ended.

            1. The Haitian Air Force used P-51 Mustangs from WWII for a long long time.

              Which is just awesome, IMO.

  7. “The intention behind the law was good.”
    Heads up! Paving truck coming through!

    1. That’s right, keep it coming, right this way…

  8. Since the late 1980s, the L.R.A. has abducted 30,000 children to form its militias. As a result of this violence, over 1.7 million people have been displaced.

    30k kids used to displace 1.7M people? Holy Fuck. We need to put this guy in command of our armed forces. With our manpower and Kony at the helm, we might get out of Afghanistan sometime this decade.

    1. made me think of Ender’s Game

    2. Kony is just re-creating what Shaka kaSenzangakhona aka Shaka Zulu did. The zulus, armed with spears, kicked the stuffing out of the Brits at Isandlwana. See also, Ho Chi Minh.

      1. Islandlwana didn’t work out so well for the Zulus in the end, though:

        “After Isandlwana, the British field army was heavily reinforced and again invaded Zululand. Sir Garnet Wolseley was sent to take command and relieve Chelmsford, as well as Bartle Frere. Chelmsford, however, avoided handing over command to Wolseley and managed to defeat the Zulus in a number of engagements, the last of which was the Battle of Ulundi, followed by capture of King Cetshwayo. The British encouraged the subkings of the Zulus to rule their subkingdoms without acknowledging a central Zulu power. By the time King Cetshwayo was allowed to return home, there was no longer an independent Zulu kingdom.”[85]

      2. And I know that, WTF, but the four countries are nowhere near as competent as the brits were.

        1. the four countries are nowhere near as competent as the brits were

          No argument there.

  9. The Kony 2012 campaign is a triumph of idiocy and slacktivism. Oh, I forwarded a video! I’m doing something to help stop this guy! I’m raising awareness! If enough people know about him…

    nobody will fucking care.

    It is an ugly fact of international geopolitics that nobody really gives a damn when Africans slaughter each other. As proof, look at how long the violence has been going on. If anybody gave a crap, there would have been a serious effort to stop it by now. Nope.

    Let’s face it, it’s just Africans killing Africans, so the rest of the world doesn’t care. It’s expected, so everybody can tut-tut and talk about how horrible it all is at some conference in Jo’burg or Cairo.

    1. We Are The World.

    2. I don’t think it’s just “We don’t care.” We’ve been intervening in the Middle East, for a variety of reasons, and have had very limited success, if you want to call it that. And many countries have a strategic interest in a relatively stable Middle East.

      In the case of many African nations, there’s no obvious solution that doesn’t involve long-term occupation, and the strategic interest mostly isn’t there.

      1. Well, there is the drone strike option, but if even one child gets killed there will be hell to pay. And it’s not that I’m insensitive to the plight of the children, but they’re equally likely to die in battle if we do nothing.

        And we could still get played by the four countries over this.

    3. Oh yeah, someone “cares”; the usual suspects are on it. From AP this morning:

      Celebrities ? and teens ? have quickly joined the cause.
      “Even if its 10 minutes … Trust me, you NEED to know about this!” tweeted Rhianna.
      “This is not a joke. This is serious. TOGETHER we can//MakeAChange and//STOPKRONY — help another kid in need!” Justin Bieber tweeted.
      “Have supported with $’s and voice and will not stop,” tweeted Oprah.

      ‘Bout time for Sean Penn to show up. And a little “We are the world; we are the Ugandan childruns” is probably right around the corner.

      1. What is Congress doing about the Compassion Gap??!!!1

      2. You mixed up your quotes. Clearly those arent the celebrity ones, but the ones from 9 yo girls.

        Right?

    4. +1. this. sadly. and i’m going to forward it to make myself feel good about myself

  10. blah blah blah blah Africa is *way* fucked up blah blah blah blah white people feel guilty about it blah blah blah blah blah a popular campaign to ‘do something’ emerges blah blah blah blah blah blah celebrities get involved blah blah blah awareness is raised blah blah blah blah blah president will probably mention it blah blah blah blah blah despite years of handwringing, nothing ever happens blah blah blah blah people forget about it because of our own problems blah blah blah blah blah few years later, we notice Africa = *still way fucked up* blah blah blah REPEAT

    1. I think China is quietly buying it up, anyway.

      1. Exactly. If the Han want to spill their blood and treasure in Africa, I gladly welcome them to do so.

      2. Yep, China is buying it up…and they deserve everything they are gonna get from it, namely a good hard fucking.

  11. This story’s Alt-Text is racist!

    1. You see him rollin? You hatin?

  12. You know who else some people wanted to “do nothing about”….

    1. Cam Newton?

      1. As a Panthers fan, and season ticket holder I have done a complete 180 on Cam. It’s all his dad anyway…

        1. I know. I’m just buttsore because I’m an Ohio State fan. I feel the timing and severity of the NCAA sanctions against tOSU were way out of line with the gentle ignorance the NCAA feigned with Cam Newton. Otherwise, I think Cam had a good rookie season. He obviously had impressive numbers, but in the NFL it’s all about winning. He’ll be interesting when he gets the Panthers to the playoffs.

          1. Expecting the NCAA to be anything close to fair is expecting too much. Yeah, he has some work to do, especially late in games, but I’ll take it over the complete QB clusterfuck he replaced.

          2. gentle ignorance the NCAA feigned with Cam Newton.

            If the NCAA could have put together a case that would survive appeal they would have put the screws to Auburn. Since they couldn’t, they had to make an example of the next school that had an inkling of impropriety and, unfortunately for us, it was the mighty Buckeyes. The significantly lighter punishment the U got for what, to me at least, were significantly worse violations (and the fact that their starters’ suspension just so happened to expire right in time for the Buckeye game) is all the proof I need of that hypothesis. I despise the NCAA.

    2. True, but it’s important to remember that “doing something” resulted in the deaths of over 400,000 Americans.

    3. Michael Myers?

    4. Oprah Winfrey?

  13. While I don’t agree with it, I can understand why this looks attractive to interventionists. Killing one psychotic is a far easier task than remaking a country and changing their culture.

    1. People don’t play enough Whac-A-Mole.

      1. The DEA is quite fond of it.

        1. Maybe we should ship them all to Africa.

    2. Dragon’s teeth.

  14. Kony’s methods are…unsound.

  15. It’s wonderful that intellectual pop culture deep thinkers like Oprah, Bieber and Rihanna have “tweeted” their approval. That’ll put a stop to things! Since material and military aid has achieved little in the past 25 years, it’s doubtful that 100 US “advisors” are going to have many impact whatsoever. The moral rot is systemic throughout the continent.

  16. To stop the L.R.A., President Obama deployed 100 military personnel to the region in October 2011. Their main priorities are to advise and assist with intelligence gathering. While these soldiers are “combat-equipped,” “they will not themselves engage LRA forces unless necessary for self defense.”

    *finger an inch from your eye*

    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!
    I’m not touching you!

    1. I thought you were talking about Iran.

      1. Let me be clear, I am going to touch the shit out of Iran after the election.

  17. This is a lose-lose situation as many have noted above. The countries in which LRA operates have proven unwilling or unable to do anything about him. Even though the anti-Kony activists talk about “arrest” that ain’t gonna happen. So “arrest” is going to turn into outside (ie, US) military intervention. And the host countries will tie our hands and milk the situation for as much money as they can for base rental, free equipment, etc.

    Sorry, but it’s time for these countries to man up and take care of this…or not.

    1. Pretty much.

      Central Africa has been fucked up for a long time, now. A quick fix for the region is not going to happen: more likely, military conflict will entrench the respective players and militarize Africa to a greater extent than today. Militarization of corrupt central African states is not a good play for either regional stability or civil liberties of Africans.

    2. “And the host countries will tie our hands and milk the situation for as much money as they can for base rental, free equipment, etc.”

      Interesting point; Kony is a potential ‘profit center’ to some of the thug-governments. And to be honest, some of the thug-governments have probably caused more harm than he has.

      1. “to be honest, some of the thug-governments have probably caused more harm than he has.”

        That’s a tough one to gauge. There isn’t necessarily a sense of continuity or legitimacy when it comes to an “official” African government; many of them are highly disjointed, Pakistan-style. Lots of the non-state actors in the region take on the roles of government in their zone of control, as well, muddying the difference even more.

        But shit, the Second Congo War (most destructive conflict since WWII) just ended a decade ago, and was perpetrated by quite a few of these governments… and we’re supposed to help them improve their armies? Good grief.

  18. Museveni has been accused of kidnapping children and turning them into child soldiers, using the same tactics as the L.R.A.

    How tony reads this:

    It is ok for the Democrats to do it cuz the Republicans do it to.

  19. Also, according to this, the anti-Kony activists are playing fast and loose with the facts. They admitted that but justified “simplifying the truth” because it was, you know, complicated, and anyway it didn’t matter since it’s about the children and all.

  20. “For whatever reason, the movie barely delves into how delusional (and Christianist) Kony is.”

    Perhaps because it’s immaterial to the central point of the movie (which is that Kony is a bad dude who does bad things). An advocacy video can’t (and shouldn’t) waste its time on ancillary details; in this case, it would either waste time or confuse and perhaps turn off the nominally Christian audience that the video attempts to reach. Why should an advocacy video be bogged down by hackneyed anti-religious garbage? (And yes, when one considers how distanced, bizarre, and non-orthodox Kony’s “Christianity” is from modern, orthodox Christianity, focus on religious elements as a way of explaining Kony’s EEEVUL are just that.)

    1. Agreed. As much as I will use Kony to refute the “all xtians are peaceful” trope in other threads, it only matters that he’s a monster.

  21. Somewhat tangential, but I was reading through the IC’s responses to the criticisms and came across this fascinating sentence:

    In Uganda, we learned very quickly that a top-down, Western approach was not the answer, and that local solutions were needed to fill critical humanitarian gaps.

    But by all means, let’s not stop to question whether the “Western approach” is also not the answer in the West.

  22. Dude that makes a lot of sense.

    http://www.Got-Privacy.tk

  23. My scorecard:

    Kony 2012 v Breitbart and O’Keefe

    manipulates mainstream media/ manipulates RW media

    appeals to gullible teenagers and celebrities/appeals to gullible Fox viewers

    deceitful about true monster/ extremely deceitful about organizations I don’t care for

    Campaign raises profile of producers in leftist community/ Campaign raises profile of producers in rightwing community

    I’ve got to score rounds 1 and 3 for Breitbart and O’Keefe and call rounds 2 and 4 a draw.

    Breitbart and O’Keefe are sleazes of the month on points.

    1. Whoops, I should only have scored round 3 for B & O. B&O still win, but it’s closer than I thought.

      ps – I just noticed that Breitbart and O’Keefe’s last initials match YOU KNOW WHO!

  24. I am happy to have viewed the video that my son shared with me, and to have shared it with my friends as well. I didn’t read anything in this article that changes my opinion of Kony. I think it is a good thing that people are being informed about something that the mainstream media was not sharing at all. When I saw Fox News last night they were discussing how Snooki being pregnant was going to effect the future of Jersey Shore. If I were to weigh in the balance which of these two stories were more newsworthy…let’s just say, I am glad that teenagers are getting excited about something that actually matters.

    1. The mainstream media is not reporting about this for the same reason that they are not reporting about the Kosovo War. It’s old news that we can do very little about.
      Kony is not, as of today, rampaging across Africa. He has been in hiding since 2006 or 2007. The LRA, while still strong, has been crumbling away. This even needs to be taken in the context of the rest of central Africa’s massive dysfunction. Otherwise, it’s mere manipulation to make money and legitimize a US buildup in Africa.

  25. Re the movie poster with Gerard Butler:

    If you ever have an opportunity to watch a movie featuring Gerard Butler trying to speak with an American accent… DON’T!!!

  26. who cares? fuck niggers.

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