Protests

Iranian Exiles Protest Iran's Internet Crackdown

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Let me Google that for you

In an effort to protect the Iranian people from "cultural invasion and threats" from the West, the Iranian government has been planning a private Internet similar to the ones used in Cuba, Myanmar/Burma, China, and North Korea. It will be called the Halal Internet, referring to the alleged moral and spiritual purity of the contents allowed. Iran's Minster of Communications and Technology Reza Taghipour claims it will be presented as an alternative to the actual Internet, contradicting prior indications that the Halal Internet would constitute "a kind of intranet for national use in order to keep Iranians from accessing the World Wide Web."

Given the Iranian government's record in the fields of transparency, human rights, and all-around morality, Taghipour's promise to leave in place the regular Internet (which is already censored in Iran as it is) is about as durable as a paper chimney. Thus, the prospect of the Halal Internet entirely supplanting access to the real thing in the near future is likely, despite the fact that successful implementation would effectively complete the isolation of Iranian citizens from the outside world.

Yesterday, Iranians in Geneva gathered outside the World Radiocommunications Conference (WRC), an event organized by a United Nations agency, to protest censorship in Iran and urge attendees of this year's WRC "to act to the fullest extent of their legal capacity to stop the jamming of Persian-language satellites and eliminate censorship conducted by the Iranian government under the banner of 'national internet.' " According to the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran:

The protesters held placards demanding an end to the Iranian government's censorship and satellite jamming. The gathering drew the attention of attending diplomats to the widespread repression of freedom of speech and access to information.

This protest in exile and the government's increased censorship are the most recent development in a conflict between Iran's people and its government that reached a peak in June 2009. Apparently, not everyone agrees on the Islamic Republic's definition of purity.

Read more about censorship, Iran in the United Nations, and protesting.

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  1. OT: Did any of you guys see the anti-capitalism protests in Romania recently? They’re not Occutard-style, either — they’re full-on communist. Fuck me. Romania, really? Fucking really?

    1. They don’t strike me as full-on commie.

      They seem to be more of an anti-government protest with various greivances mentioned.

  2. Morpheus: The Matrix is everywhere. It is all around us. Even now, in this very room. You can see it when you look out your window or when you turn on your television. You can feel it when you go to work… when you go to church… when you pay your taxes. It is the world that has been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth.
    Neo: What truth?
    Morpheus: That you are a slave, Neo. Like everyone else you were born into bondage. Into a prison that you cannot taste or see or touch. A prison for your mind.

  3. Iran’s Minster of Communications and Technology

    When Net Neutrality finally passes, maybe we’ll get one of those!

    1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F…..Commission

      Not close enough?

  4. A great idea would be for the US to constantly threaten Iran with war and economic embargos to rally their people behind the crazy ass ayatollahs and give them cover for authoritarian shit like this!

    1. Yes, I think you’re on to something. Perhaps you should let the three not Ron Paul candidates in on this, too.

  5. I suspect that the regime will find this backfiring: the information they are trying to keep out of the Halal system will get on, nevertheless, while the harmless apolitical types will be blocked from their sites and turn further against the regime.

    To understand why, it’s instructive to look at a network that was largely supplanted and made obsolete by the Internet: Fidonet

    The Fidonet protocol is perfect for allowing exchange of limited chunks of information to be replicated across nodes that are not connected 100% of the time.

    If they allow individuals to connect to the Halal network with their PC’s, they will be susceptible to a Fidonet style system.

    Thus a subversive site on the Internet, like Reason.com would be cached every 12 hours, and copied via modem to a Halalnet system, and then uploaded to a mirror server there.

    Moreover, it’s unlikely that the networks will be fully segregated; the elites will want to email the outside world, etc. In all likelihood, there will be gateways between the two acting as sally ports, and such systems could be compromised by hackers or by operators who do not agree with the government’s strictures.

  6. It will be called the Halal Internet, referring to the alleged moral and spiritual purity of the contents allowed.

    2 Girls 1 Cup and a Male Chaperone

  7. Yesterday, Iranians in Geneva gathered outside the World Radiocommunications Conference (WRC), an event organized by a United Nations agency, to protest censorship in Iran and urge attendees of this year’s WRC “to act to the fullest extent of their legal capacity to stop the jamming of Persian-language satellites and eliminate censorship conducted by the Iranian government under the banner of ‘national internet.’

    Yeah. I’m sure they’ll get right on that, given how the West just told Iranians to settle down after Ahmedinejad was fishily “reelected” in 2009. I look forward to seeing another “strongly-worded condemnation” from the Useless Nations. Oooh, I’m skared!

    If Iranians want this shit to stop, they need to (1) stop electing clinically-insane Islamofascist assholes, or (2) if they’re not actually electing said Islamofascist assholes, then they need to take their country back the hard way, Persian-Spring style. The Useless Nations isn’t going to do jack for them because it’s trying to pretty-please get Iran to put down the nukes, and frankly, if the people of Iran want to be free, they need to make themselves free.

    1. (2) if they’re not actually electing said Islamofascist assholes, then they need to take their country back the hard way, Persian-Spring style

      Based on the way the other “Spring” movements are going, I’d say they had theirs a few decades ago.

  8. Why does this Ershadi chick always want to talk about Iranian stuff? Is she a Ay-rab?

  9. America’s shit don’t stink.

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