Drug War

Cato Conference: Ending the Global War on Drugs

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Two weeks ago, I noted the growing disenchantment with the war on drugs among current and former Latin American politicians. That subject, along with other examples of international dissent, should be explored in detail next Tuesday at a Cato Institute conference about "Ending the Global War on Drugs." The speakers will include Fernando Henrique Cardoso (right), a former president of Brazil and an organizer of the Global Commission on Drug Policy; Jorge Castañeda, a former Mexican minister of foreign affairs; Luis Alberto Lacalle Pou, speaker of Uruguay's House of Deputies; Mary Anastasia O'GradyThe Wall Street Journal's longtime Latin America columnist; and Salon blogger Glenn Greenwald, who lives in Rio de Janeiro and wrote a 2009 Cato paper on drug decriminalization in Portugal. They are supposed to discuss, among other things, "the impact of the drug war in Mexico, on the U.S. border, and in Central America"; "lessons from South America"; "how prohibition helps fund terrorist groups in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and beyond"; "how Washington's anti-narcotics campaign violates the Constitution"; "the effects of criminalization on minorities in the United States"; and "what decriminalization or legalization would look like in practice."

More information here.

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  1. End it.

    1. …by the city-State (civilization) is the most aggressive campaign ever.

  2. The “war on drugs” like the “war on terror” makes the US look more and more foolish. The very name is a soundbite looking for substance, and what substance it has is at odds with our Constitution and our founding principles. In the end, it may be Mexico or Guatemala or where-ever that come to their senses first and cry “Enough!”.

    1. The “war on gambol” like the “war on terror” or the “war on drugs” and makes the US look more and more foolish. The very name is a soundbite looking for substance, and what substance it has is at odds with a two-million year run of freedom. It may be Mexico or Guatemala or where-ever that come to their senses first and cry “Enough!”.

  3. p.s. Don’t feed the trolls!

    1. …except in tiny, libertarianKOCH OIL-approved amounts inside the prison.

      How we sell little bits of goodies inside the prison walls — free market!!! — is all we want to think about.

      Breaking the prison walls is verboten.

      As long as the food remains under lock and key, the prison runs itself. The governing that you see is the prisoners governing themselves. They’re allowed to do that and live as they please within the prison.

      ~Daniel Quinn
      Part 1: The Problem is Civilization
      Prison
      http://www.lejournalmural.be/english-…..lla-1.html

  4. One thing cfs. like this unfortunately hardly ever address is the question, “How do we get from here to there?” When they do address it, the answer usually takes the form of “head first” or “feet first” rather than attempting to answer how to make the people one would need to do their bidding do so.

  5. You guys sure are bored with this topic, I will hang up on myself now.

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