Deregulation

Your Flight Has Been Delayed—and it's the FAA's fault!

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Yesterday's Reason.tv video on the U.S. antiquated air-traffic control system eerily anticipated the major screw-ups currently being caused by the Federal Aviation Administration's computers.

FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said she doesn't know how many flights are being affected or when the problem will be resolved.

Another FAA spokesperson, Paul Takemoto, said the problem started between 5:15 a.m. and 5:30 a.m. EST. The outage is affecting mostly flight plans but also traffic management, such as ground stops and ground delays, he said.

Regarding flight plans, airplane dispatchers are now sending plans to controllers and controllers in turn are entering them into computers manually, he said.

"It's slowing everything down. We don't know yet what the impact on delays will be," Takemoto said.

A problem with the FAA system that collects airlines' flight plans caused widespread flight cancellations and delays nationwide Thursday. It was the second time in 15 months that a glitch in the flight plan system caused delays.

More here.

Here's the video:

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  1. FAA Mission Statement:

    Our Mission

    Our continuing mission is to provide the safest, most efficient aerospace system in the world.

    1. Aren’t safety and efficiency mutually exclusive? Like, to have more of one you need to give up some of the other don’t you?

      1. No. GPS instead of radar would be both safer and more efficient for air travel.

        1. Agreed, with the proviso that elaborate proximity programming must be layered on the shared GPS system. But yes, air corridors is an idea that wastes time, fuel, and increases chances of mishap or collision.

        2. I’m sure they can come up with enough regulations to eliminate any added efficiency.

  2. Mission Accomplished FUBARed!

  3. Mission Accomplished FUBARed!

  4. eerily anticipated the major screw-ups

    So, your video anticipated something that has been happening for years? How astonishingly psychic.

  5. “Eerily anticipated” my beige ass. You got used by Slightly Less Big Air Traffic Control. Your video was the “go” for their moles and saboteurs.

    WAKE UP, PATSY

  6. eerily anticipated the major screw-ups

    The Large Hadron Collider did it.

  7. It’s a good thing folks like this don’t run our health care.

    (Somebody had to say it.)

  8. Yesterday’s Reason.tv video on the U.S. antiquated air-traffic control system eerily anticipated the major screw-ups

    “eerily anticipated”, or “mysteriously precipitated”?

  9. “eerily anticipated”, or “mysteriously precipitated”?

    To-may-to, to-mah-to.

  10. “A problem with the FAA system that collects airlines’ flight plans caused widespread flight cancellations and delays nationwide Thursday. It was the second time in 15 months that a glitch in the flight plan system caused delays.”

    Once every 15 months? Oh the humanity!

    1. A glitch that caused massive delays, by an organization that is solely responsible for making airlines run efficiently. In other words, the 2nd major FAIL in 15 months (averaged to one every 7.5 months)

      It’d be like a glitch at McDonalds causing everyone across the nation to have to wait an extra 20 min for their fast food

  11. We should let the free market regulate airplanes. Once enough of them crash from complete confusion, the sky will be nice and thinned out, making air travel more efficient than ever imagined.

    1. Dear Tony,

      Please develop bone cancer and suffer a long and agonizing death.

      Thank you.

  12. Tony, you are so dumb it’s startling.

    1. Reading Tony makes me somewhat ashamed of humanity.

      1. Tony makes me miss joe.

        And brains. Brrrrraaaaains.

  13. Once every 15 months? Oh the humanity!

    Ask around with people who run mission-critical systems. A CIO whose mission-critical system failed twice in fifteen months would be on the street.

    I can’t tell you how much I’m looking forward to the massive interoperable health database being run to these standards.

    1. on Wang Terminals no less!

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