Airbnb and Its Enemies: Who's Afraid of a $10-a-Night Sofa?

The popular short-term rental site angers everyone but its participants.

Lauren and Rob, who moved to New York City to make it in showbiz, rent a one-bedroom apartment on Manhattan's Upper West Side that costs $2,250 per month. Lacking a regular paycheck, the two performers make ends meet by hawking short-term stays on their living-room couch for $65 a night. Travelers find them through Airbnb, a popular online service that connects residents who want to pick up some extra cash from out-of-towners who are looking for a cheaper alternative to a traditional hotel.

"On average, we cover half our rent," says Lauren, who asked that we not reveal her last name because of the legal issues surrounding Airbnb rentals. "And so it takes away the worry."

Airbnb, the most popular short-term rental site, is exploding in popularity, with a reported five-fold increase in its bookings in one year. The site has 200,000 listings available in 192 countries. Customers can stay in an igloo in Greenland, a Tipi in Denmark, or a tree house above San Francisco Bay. In New York City, where the average hotel room runs $350 per night, tourists can pay as little as $10 to stay on a worn couch.

Despite its rapid growth, this sort of peer-to-peer accommodation network still makes up a fraction of the U.S. lodging industry. There are 45,000 Airbnb domestic listings, which is less than 1 percent of the size of the U.S. hotel business, with its 4.9 million guest rooms.

But Airbnb and similar services have made enough of an impact to draw powerful enemies. These range from city officials trying to maximize lucrative hotel taxes to a hospitality industry fearful of competition to tenants-rights advocates who think the short-termers diss traditional renters.

In coming years, the company and its users can expect to face more legal headaches, as municipalities create new regulatory hurdles. Airbnb is fighting back: The company has established a Washington, D.C. lobbying presence, hired a veteran government-relations expert, and inserted itself into a legal dispute over Airbnb rentals in New York City. The uproar over short-term rentals in the Big Apple stems from one of the distinguishing facets of that city's housing market: rent control. Airbnb has exacerbated many of the unintended consequences of artificially capping what landlords are allowed to charge for apartments (more on that in a moment).Would you pay $10 per night to sleep on this couch on Manhattan's Upper West Side? |||

In the face of healthy demand, some cities are having only mixed success at restricting Airbnb use. When hotels in Austin, Texas book up during the city's annual South by Southwest festival every March, Airbnb connects thousands of visitors with a place to stay. But many locals offer up their couches or guest beds in violation of city regulations, which require they first undergo a home inspection, purchase a $285 permit, live in a neighborhood that hasn't already reached its quota, and pay local hotel taxes. 

Portland, Oregon bans AirBnb in all residential neighborhoods of the city, but allows it in industrial areas where permanent residents aren't allowed to live—just as long as there's off-street parking available and a six-foot-wide paved sidewalk between the building and the street.

New York City allows hosts like Lauren and Rob to operate as long as they're at home while they have a guest and offer the guest open access to every room in their apartment, including all bedrooms. Last year, Nigel Warren, an East Village resident who rented out his bedroom on Airbnb while he was in Colorado for three nights, drew fines of more than $40,000. The penalties were later reduced to $2,400 by an administrative judge. Airbnb is helping Warren and his landlord, Abe Carrey, appeal the decision. Warren's case is unusual; laws against Airbnb use by tenants are rarely enforced and more typically openly ignored.

Marti Weithman helped push for a state law cracking down on Airbnb rentals.|||

The city has been more aggressive in cracking down on landlords who rent vacant apartments for short-term stays. In 2012, the city sued and filed a restraining order against Smart Apartments, an Airbnb competitor that landlords were using to advertise vacation pads in nearly 50 residential buildings.

Why do landlords want to use Airbnb? About half of the city's housing stock is "rent regulated," meaning the rate landlords can charge is artificially capped. In some cases, landlords stand to earn much more through short-term rentals than a through a conventional year-long lease. Tenant advocacy groups complain this practice is chasing away rent-regulated tenants and draining the city's supply of rental apartments.

Marti Weithman, a tenant lawyer with the Goddard Riverside Community Center, is part of New York's "Illegal Hotels Working Group," and she helped push for the passage of a 2011 state law that strengthened enforcement against landlords using Airbnb. Indeed, she calls the sort of short-term rentals facilitated by Airbnb a form of "harassment." 

"You have these tourists who are coming to the city and they're on vacation," says Weithman. "They're up all night and throwing up in the bathrooms, and that provides a sense of insecurity for permanent residents." She says the disturbances caused by Airbnb tenants could ultimately drive rent-regulated tenants to leave the city altogether.

"Maybe they have a job here and they're making a living here," says Weithman, "so why should they pushed to another state just so Airbnb can come in and make millions of dollars?"

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  • Almanian!||

    Yeah, the ginger with the mic? I'd bang her like a rented drum.

    And TIWTANLW...

  • Dweebston||

    Nah, this is why most reason staff stay the ef out of the comments section.

  • jese012||

    my classmate's step-mother makes $74/hr on the laptop. She has been fired for seven months but last month her pay was $18454 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Read more on this web site .............. buzz90.com

  • Hugh Akston||

    This...

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    Listen, nerdlingers. Have some fucking respect for yourselves. The more you drool over every woman who pops up, the more desperate you look.

  • Irish||

    Yeah, this was pretty weird and offputting.

  • John C. Randolph||

    Note to self: never rent a drum to Almanian.

    -jcr

  • CE||

    Or stay on his couch.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Nobody's gonna think yer gay if you don't say anything about the pretty girl.

  • ||

    Nobody's gonna think yer gay if you don't say anything about the pretty girl.

    We could make this a thing. Clearly whoever is rushing to comment about the pretty girl is overcompensating for something. I bet that Almanian! has a touch of lavender to him.

    This probably would've been more effective in the '90s when arbitrarily calling someone gay had a bit more sting to it.

  • Lady Bertrum||

    Or, we can assume he has a small penis and tiny cherry-pit sized balls. Another reason to overcompensate. Just a thought.

  • ||

    Do we then also assume that he drives a massive lifted Ford truck with flames painted on the front and 4WD, but never leaves his suburban sub-division?

  • Lady Bertrum||

    Yes, and he has a huge fat wife who cheats on him with the manger of the local Arby's.

  • ||

    That's just terrible! I mean I could understand if it were someone from Carl's Jr, but Arby's... I would be overcompensating on the internet if I knew that my wife were taking it from the manager at Arby's with that horrible adult acne.

  • ΘJΘʃ de águila||

    "....Lavender green
    Then I'll be king, dilly, dilly
    And you'll be my queen."

    Burl Ives - Lavender Blue (Dilly Dilly)

  • Shikozu||

    it's really a shame the comment section of this site wasn't a better reflection of it's content.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    I want Naomi to narrate every ReasonTV video.

  • sarcasmic||

    aye

  • Hugh Akston||

    ...and this is why there are no libertarian women. Try to show some dignity you guys.

  • Dweebston||

    Actually, I think it's legit. That lispy, breathy guy they had doing videos sounded like he masturbates with a limp wrist.

  • John C. Randolph||

    Not that there's anything wrong with that.

    -jcr

  • Marc F Cheney||

    I don't even like redheads.

    (This is called "negging", guys! That's how you should "roll".)

  • Dweebston||

    I always neg, but I don't think women appreciate my self-deprecating humor.

  • Gorilla tactics||

    negging does kinda work actually

  • ΘJΘʃ de águila||

  • Jesus H. Christ||

    "This is called "negging", guys! "

    I guess that makes you a negger?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    There's no dignity to be had. Apparently every time a GIRL shows up the Commentariat has to act like they've never seen one before.

  • Irish||

    ^ This. I understand mentioning offhand that she's cute, but some of the above comments are disgusting.

  • ||

    "Disgusting"? FFS, what is this, Jezebel? I come to Reason to get away from the perpetual lamentations of the perpetually offended.

  • Irish||

    'I'd bang that redhead like a rented drum' is pretty gross. It's gross because it sounds like the desperate musings of a flop sweating 15 year old.

  • sarcasmic||

    I'd bang Megan Fox like a rented drum.

    That redhead would get the slow treatment.

  • ||

    I'd bang Megan Fox like a rented drum.

    Two words buddy: Club thumbs.

  • PH2050||

    Those aren't thumbs.

    They're her extra big toes.

  • Gorilla tactics||

    Megan fox can ride me like seabiscuit

  • ||

    I think what we've got here is a case of people pretending to be offended publicly by something they wouldn't bat an eye at in private. You can't tell me you haven't heard something similar a million times if you've ever spent time with single men under 30. Particularly when inebriated.

  • ||

    And in comes sarcasmic to prove my point...

    Anyway, I'd say such comments could be accurately characterized as distasteful. Disgusting implies a level of personal offense that I would be astonished if anyone here actually experienced upon reading it.

  • A Secret Band of Robbers||

    That's a good distinction. I'm not offended when a kid poops his diaper, but that doesn't necessarily mean I'm eager to stick around and appreciate the bouquet.

  • Auric Demonocles||

    They have certainly figured out how to get me to watch their videos.

  • CE||

    I'm thinking a series of how-to videos.

  • Metazoan||

    "You have these tourists who are coming to the city and they're on vacation," says Weithman. "They're up all night and throwing up in the bathrooms, and that provides a sense of insecurity for permanent residents."

    No evidence for the majority of them turning out like this. Besides, you usually need references and stuff to get a place on Airbnb. This is a load of horseshit (the usual status of the product of statists).

  • mr simple||

    Yeah, that woman was an idiot grasping at straws for a reason to be against this. Note the argument against bnb making millions by forcing people out of their homes, or whatever. Typical prog reasoning: I have no argument so maybe worst possible scenario i can think of that relies on my target being malicious and having more power than they do!

  • Pinky||

    She said,"it's wrong because it's illegal."

    That's good enough for me.

  • Doctor Whom||

    We need government regulations to undo the unintended consequences of the last round of government regulations. And when the new government regulations have unintended consequences, then the cycle begins anew.

  • Metazoan||

    "I don't feel like they should have to pick up and move just because..."

    I've heard this argument in so many ways, and I'm not sure if there's a simpler way to say it than YOU HAVE NO RIGHT TO LIVE IN A NEIGHBORHOOD OR EVEN CITY YOU CANNOT AFFORD.

  • sarcasmic||

    See? Libertarians are just apologists for the rich!
    /Tony

  • ||

    The term he uses is 'wealth apologist', whatever the fuck that means.

  • sarcasmic||

    Accumulations of wealth represent starving children. Anyone with accumulated wealth is causing children to starve, and that is something to be apologized for. By making up excuses for accumulations of wealth, libertarians are 'wealth apologists.'

    For that to make sense you must ignore any distinction between wealth, income and money. Just blur those things together into one fuzzy thing to be envious of. Semantics are for simple minds. Stop thinking and emote. Then you will understand.

  • Doctor Whom||

    Stop thinking and emote. Then you will understand.

    I was told that almost verbatim in church. Of course, that doesn't prove that progressive fervor is even the tiniest bit like religious fervor.

  • sarcasmic||

    I'd be in the market for a different church if I were you.

  • Doctor Whom||

    Don't worry. I left that one a while ago.

  • robc||

    I'd be in the market for a different church if I were you.

    Ditto.

  • CE||

    I'm no wealth apologist. If someone wants an apology for my wealth, I'll have one of my servants sent him a note.

  • Gorilla tactics||

    THAT'S GANGSTA YO!

  • ||

    YOU HAVE NO RIGHT TO LIVE IN A NEIGHBORHOOD OR EVEN CITY YOU CANNOT AFFORD.

    I'd like for the people who ascribe to this to be trying to sell real estate that's gone up in value, just to have the state come in and say, "hey, buddy: people shouldn't be priced out of their neighborhoods just because your house has gone up in value. You're only allowed to break even on this. Can't be upsetting the neighborhood."

    It's always great coming up with these ideas, as long as you're not the person getting screwed out of their own property.

  • ||

    Actually, I meant ascribing to the opposite sentiment, that this was a response to.

  • perlhaqr||

    I'm pretty sure it's never people who own property who ascribe to that sort of 'philosophy'.

  • Dweebston||

    A way for poor people to supplement their incomes by allowing other poor people to travel more affordably. I can see why Bloomberg hates it: far too hoi polloi.

  • ||

    The rationale is supposed to be that consumers can't know if they are going to get rapes or robbed when they rent from unknowns. Or if the hotel has lice in it's mattresses.

    The answer to that is of course that AirBnb has ratings and reviews, so if someone gets robbed or raped or if the place is a shithole, users can report it in the review and nobody will rent there again.

    That sort of thing may not have been possible 100 years ago, but it is today.

  • Dweebston||

    Ironically, this sort of thing would not have been illegal a century ago.

  • Metazoan||

    That sort of thing may not have been possible 100 years ago, but it is today.

    Statists have a hard time understanding genuine progress.

  • Dweebston||

    No, they've got an idea: government was small, and most people were poor and miserable. Government is big now, and proportionally fewer people are poor and miserable. Progress!

  • Doctor Whom||

    Progress is measured by the number of pages in the administrative code.

  • Almanian!||

    Then, truly, we have reached Nirvana

  • Gorbag||

    No, no, no. It's not nirvana until the number of pages is uncountably infinite.

  • JW||

    The answer to that is of course that AirBnb has ratings and reviews, so if someone gets robbed or raped or if the place is a shithole, users can report it in the review and nobody will rent there again.

    The slavers would argue that Yelp and other ratings sites for regular hotels negate this argument for airbnb.

    Why are we even pretending that this has anything to do with public safety and consumer protection? It's all about the incumbent businesses and their parasite partners not liking competition, nothing else

  • ||

    I think they'd argue that rape is too serious to be left to the vagaries of the free market. Only licensing can prevent crime.

  • JW||

    Are you saying that free market fails to provide enough rape?

  • kingnp2n||

    Heh. The free market rapes me all the time, but I wouldn't trade it for a bread line.

  • perlhaqr||

    I don't think we actually are pretending that, that's what the statists are pretending, so they don't have to admit to themselves that their true motivation is to prop up big businesses (hotel chains) and to demand below-market prices on commodities (apartment rents).

  • ||

    Amy Parness was caught by her landlord pulling in $4,500 per month on Airbnb by renting out her $1,400 per month one-bedroom on the Lower East Side. Most leases explicitly ban such activities without landlord approval.

    Easy solution. Cut the landlord in on the deal.

  • UnCivilServant||

    Landlord was getting $1400 of it already.

  • ||

    Well if the problem is the landlord turning you into the cops, he's obviously not getting paid enough.

    The article states that landlords have been doing this on the sly and getting caught by other tenants. Now the tenants are doing it on the sly and getting caught by the landlords.

    So why don't they just join forces and split the profits?

  • Gorbag||

    Join forces with whom? The cops?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    $1400 a month for a one-bedroom? That sounds like rent control to me.

  • robc||

    The funny thing is, that sounds outrageously high to me.

    Hurray for flyover country cost of living!

  • ||

    The funny think is, that's about what I'm paying in No.Va.

  • ||

    Ok, well, mine is a two-bedroom duplex with a back yard. But still...

  • Riven||

    Dear sweet baby Jesus with his golden-fleece diapers... I pay less than that on my mortgage every month.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    The funny thing is, that sounds outrageously high to me.

    That's because it is outrageously high.

    When I lived in Lexington I rented out a 3/2.5 with a finished basement and full sized garage that was situated on 1/2 an acre for less than $1k a month.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    I have some friends from the local pub that rent a room on. Airbnb. $60 bucks a night, three to four nights a week. Nice income, tax free, too.

    Sometimes they bring their guests down the pub. Germans and Swedes mostly. About half are cute girls.

  • John||

    My neighbors did that with some traveling folk musicians from Norway. Two rather cute 20 something girls. My wife immediately killed my thoughts of renting out our spare bedroom for extra money.

  • grey||

    They can stay at our house if they are interested in Oklahoma (big leap there I know), my wife would have no problem with it. Where are the pics?

  • John||

    Not sure where they headed to next.

  • CE||

    But you could have earned even more with your own Internet TV channel...

  • ||

    Hot Germans and Swedes you say?

  • John||

    If my wife ever divorces me, my couch will become a home for wayward traveling Eurochicks. A hot German chick will come and pay you to hang out your house. I am not seeing a downside to this.

  • ||

    Hairy legs & pits.

  • John||

    Not true. They shave now.

  • AlexInCT||

    She eats your liver with fava beans and a fine Chianti?

  • Invisible Finger||

    They'll steal your towels, too.

  • CE||

    Actually, it's not technically tax free...

  • Pinky||

    Oh yeah, that. I pay my fair share.

  • John||

    This is a great example of people not getting that people can work these issues out themselves. If the hipsters in 5G are running a hotel and their neighbors are bothered by it, the landlord can not renew their lease or enforce a prohibition against subletting if one exists. If no one is bothered by it, then there is no problem. It is amazing how people are able to find solutions to things no law needed beyond simple landlord tenant law.

    But I would add one caveat. Idiotic landlord tenant laws that make it impossible for landlords to kick out troublesome tenants prevent people from resolving disputes themselves. If the hipsters running the hotel really is a problem for the building, in a place like NYC it is going to be impossible to kick them out and thus demanding a law will be the only alternative available.

  • CE||

    A wise man (Harry Browne) once said, "government breaks your leg, then gives you a crutch."

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Then it has the gaul to call you a hypocrite you for having to rely on the crutch.

  • William of Purple||

    Wasn't this an episode of the Simpsons?
    They made extra money by becoming a hostel for German backpackers.

  • ||

    It occured to me recently that when people say they "backpacked across Europe" they don't actually mean walking.

  • Auric Demonocles||

    Marti Weithman: "I don't think there's anything wrong with that, but there's something very wrong with that in NYC because the laws make that illegal."

    Okay, if there is nothing wrong with that, why is it illegal in the first place?

  • John||

    The money quote is just below that.

    She says the disturbances caused by Airbnb tenants could ultimately drive rent-regulated tenants to leave the city altogether.

    The way it is supposed to work is that if your land lord lets people do shit that you don't like, you move to a building that enforces stricter rules. But oh, if you do that you lose your precious rent control and actually have to pay what your apartment is worth. And we can't have that.

    That bitch is doing nothing but shilling for the welfare queens who live in New York rent controls. Fuck your. If you want to make it impossible to kick someone out of their apartment, then live with the consequences of tenants who know they can't be evicting not giving a shit if they bother their neighbors.

  • Lady Bertrum||

    "She says the disturbances caused by Airbnb tenants could ultimately drive rent-regulated tenants to leave the city altogether."

    That part is absolute bs. If you're fortunate enough to have a rent controlled apartment in NYC you will NEVER give it up. Never.

  • John||

    Of course not. But it sucks to have neighbors you don't like. So you hire this broad to pass a law.

  • A Secret Band of Robbers||

    Prof. Farnsworth: Oh how awful. Did he at least die painlessly? [pause] To shreds you say, tsk tsk tsk. Well, how's his wife holding up? [pause] To shreds, you say. [He hangs up.] Sad, sad, terrible, gruesome news about my colleague, Dr. Mbutu.
    Leela: Was his apartment rent-controlled?

  • sarcasmic||

    "No society can exist unless the laws are respected to a certain degree. The safest way to make laws respected is to make them respectable. When law and morality contradict each other, the citizen has the cruel alternative of either losing his moral sense or losing his respect for the law. These two evils are of equal consequence, and it would be difficult for a person to choose between them. "
    -The Law, Bastiat

  • some guy||

    These two evils are of equal consequence, and it would be difficult for a person to choose between them.

    I have to disagree there. There's little consequence for losing one's respect for the law so long as one does not act on that lack of respect (and one retains one's moral sense). In fact, I'd say a lack of respect for the law is healthy so long as it doesn't drive you to actually do anything that will result in serious punishment.

  • sarcasmic||

    I respect that there are assholes out there with the power to lock me in a cage if they catch me disobeying words written by legislators, but other than that I couldn't give a shit what the law says.

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    "There's little consequence for losing one's respect for the law so long as one does not act on that lack of respect (and one retains one's moral sense)."

    These are big ifs.

    Bastiat was obviously a hard-core liberty lover, but he certainly recognized the dilemma imposed by bad laws - either you assimilate the idea that the bad laws are actually good, or you acquire contempt for law, which leads to disregard off even the good laws. See: The Soviet Union and the plundering of "public property."

    Bastiat didn't want to promote either anarchy or despotism. He wanted to avoid that nasty alternative with good laws which respected the rights of the people.

  • Mark22||

    What causes obedience or disobedience of the law is a question of psychology and something that can only be resolved by experiment. Bastiat was out of his depth.

  • R C Dean||

    There's little consequence for losing one's respect for the law so long as one does not get caught acting on that lack of respect (and one retains one's moral sense).

  • CE||

    To paraphrase Jefferson, "the law if often but the tyrant's will, especially if your mayor is named Bloomberg."

  • The Late P Brooks||

    We need government regulations to undo the unintended consequences of the last round of government regulations. And when the new government regulations have unintended consequences, then the cycle begins anew.

    "You know how when you squeeze a balloon, and it bulges out, and then when you push the bulge back in, it just goes somewhere else? We just need to make the balloon stronger. Like out of lead, or something."

  • some guy||

    Or squeeze all parts of the balloon equally... until it pops.

  • grey||

    There was a question in the video, something like, Is it wrong to lease a room to a person that needs it? Simple morality question. Answer: It's not legal. Wha...wha...wtf? How do people run past simple morality questions without even pausing?

  • some guy||

    How do people run past simple morality questions without even pausing?

    It's called "Being a TEAM player."

  • JW||

    That woman makes me question the NAP.

  • robc||

    Slavers have aggressed already.

  • Spartacus||

    This is what law school does to you.

  • John C. Randolph||

    I had an AirBnB account, and had tried using them once or twice, but it never worked out. Then, last week, they spammed me, so I won't be using them in the future. Good to know they have competition.

    Oh, and fuck that rent control shyster bitch. People like her are a huge part of why rental housing in NYC is so goddamned expensive.

    -jcr

  • JW||

    People like her are a huge part of why rental housing in NYC is so goddamned expensive.

    Oh, come now. You know it's because of the Jew capitalist slumlords. They'd tear everything down and force everyone to live in wooden shacks, if they had their way.

  • John||

    But without rent control only rich yuppies could live in New York. What about the culture?

  • JW||

    Sorry, I keep getting my narratives crossed up. Is it because it would hurt the poor or only benefit the rich this week?

  • Irish||

    "You have these tourists who are coming to the city and they're on vacation," says Weithman. "They're up all night and throwing up in the bathrooms, and that provides a sense of insecurity for permanent residents." She says the disturbances caused by Airbnb tenants could ultimately drive rent-regulated tenants to leave the city altogether.

    Aren't New York rent control laws already working towards just that end?

  • John C. Randolph||

    Tenant advocacy groups complain this practice is chasing away rent-regulated tenants and draining the city's supply of rental apartments.

    BULLSHIT.

    What's draining the city's supply of rental apartments is fucking RENT CONTROL. Half the goddamned yuppies in Connecticut have an apartment in NYC that they're hanging onto just because rent control makes it worth their while to stay on the lease and sub-let it behind the owner's back.

    -jcr

  • Lady Bertrum||

    And, you can pass on your apartment to immediate family. If grandmom is in a controlled unit, when she passes, the grandkids get the unit.

  • John||

    The 10 or 12 room apartment on Central Park where Mia Farrow lives and was used in Hannah and Her Sisters is a rent control. I think Mia pays around $1200 a month for it. But rent control is totally for the poor and the elderly.

  • Gorilla tactics||

    rent control WORKS!!! Look, the word CONTROL is there, see? Just because NY and SF have the most severe rent control laws in the nation,that has nothing to do with their highest rents in the US. All words, intentions and ideas manifest themselves perfectly in the real world, just say it and will be so.

  • LynchPin1477||

    These people's depravity knows no bounds. We've stayed in Airbnb apartments twice nice (once in New York, once in Sydney) and they were awesome. Friendly people, great locations, and way cheaper than a hotel. How anyone other than the building owner can think it is any of their damn business is absolutely beyond me.

  • John||

    Some people are paranoid and think any stranger is there to rob them. I could see where a building owner might not like it if his tenants complained. It is their building and they do need to keep their tenants happy.

  • KPres||

    Who gives a fuck about New York? 99.95% of the country doesn't live there and doesn't care what kind of shithole it is.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    That's kind of my attitude towards NY. NYers aren't fucking special, and generally seem to be the lowest kind of statist scum eager to make a law against anything they think is icky. So fuck NY and most NYers.

  • Dave Rogers||

    So many restraints on "free trade"... And folks wonder why we have welfare. Back eighty years ago, any Ellis Island immigrant could paint "TAXI" on any old car...and there you go...they were a taxi cab driver. Now it costs tens of thousands of dollars to get a cab going in a big city...so...we have welfare.

    Everybody needs protection from the little guy competing with them.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    About half of the city's housing stock is "rent regulated," meaning the rate landlords can charge is artificially capped. In some cases, landlords stand to earn much more through short-term rentals than a through a conventional year-long lease. Tenant advocacy groups complain this practice is chasing away rent-regulated tenants and draining the city's supply of rental apartments.

    Gee. Who could have guessed that price controls would create a shortage? Even the most indoctrinated of them all should be able to understand the very basic concept that if you set prices artificially low, supply CANNOT keep up with demand. It's very fucking simple.

  • Gorbag||

    No, no, no. You fix it by not reimbursing the doctors for their costs. Sorry, were we talking about medicare?

  • grey||

    Government should have no role in the transaction, and that's what we've been discussing. However, the Landlord Tenant lease agreement should be whatever is negotiated. If it says no-subletting, of any kind or any duration, then I have no sympathy. I'm betting a residential lease in NY, even without the rent control portion, is far from a free market ageement.

  • randdy||

    upto I saw the check saying $7450, I didnt believe that...my... brothers friend was like realey bringing in money parttime online.. there sisters roommate has been doing this for under 23 months and resantly repayed the mortgage on their place and bourt themselves a BMW. this is where I went www.jazz77.com

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  • Progressive Puritans: From e-cigs to sex classifieds, the once transgressive left wants to criminalize fun.
  • Port Authoritarians: Chris Christie’s Bridgegate scandal
  • The Menace of Secret Government: Obama’s proposed intelligence reforms don’t safeguard civil liberties

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