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Charges Against Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange Accidentally Revealed by U.S. Prosecutors: Reason Roundup

Plus: the NRA versus New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and CNN versus the White House

Whoops. "US Department of Justice 'accidentally reveals existence of sealed charges (or a draft for them) against WikiLeaks' publisher Julian Assange in apparent cut-and-paste error in an unrelated case also at the Eastern District of Virginia," tweeted the WikiLeaks account Thursday night, with a link to a federal court filing.

That case—against a person prosecutors were seeking to charge with coercion and enticement of a minor—saw the state attempting to seal the criminal complaint against defendant Seitu Sulayman Kokayi, its supporting documents, and the arrest warrant. "The United States has considered alternatives less drastic than sealing, including, for example, the possibility of redactions, and has determined that none would suffice to protect this investigation," states the motion, which was filed back in August but is only gaining attention now, thanks to the next sentence:

Another procedure short of sealing will not adequately protect the needs of law enforcement at this time because, due to the sophistication of the defendant and the publicity surrounding the case, no other procedure is likely to keep confidential the fact that Assange has been charged.

The odd juxtaposition was noticed yesterday by Seamus Hughes, deputy director of George Washington University's Program on Extremism.

Earlier in the day Thursday, a Wall Street Journal piece said that federal authorities were "increasingly optimistic" that the Justice Department "will be able to get [Assange] into a U.S. courtroom." Ecuador is allegedly itching to get Assange out of its London embassy. "The exact charges Justice Department might pursue remain unclear," reported the Journal, "but they may involve the Espionage Act, which criminalizes the disclosure of national defense-related information."

Assange is mentioned a twice in the Kokayi motion. "The complaint, supporting affidavit, and arrest warrant, as well as this motion and the proposed order, would need to remain sealed until Assange is arrested in connection with the charges in the criminal complaint," it says on the second page.

Elsewhere, the document correctly lists Kokayi as the subject of the motion. His case has nothing to do with Assange, who has been living in the Ecuadorean embassy in London since 2012. The reveal appears to have been a mistake, with prosecutors taking language used (or at least prepared) in Assange's case and forgetting to swap out his name for Kokayi's.

"The court filing was made in error," said Joshua Stueve of the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Virginia.

The New York Times speculates that the Assange arrest language may have been lifted from a draft motion and no actual charges against Assange brought to a grand jury yet. But Assange's laywer and Wikileaks suggest otherwise.

"The news that criminal charges have apparently been filed against Mr. Assange is even more troubling than the haphazard manner in which that information has been revealed," Assange lawyer Barry Pollack told the Times. "The government bringing criminal charges against someone for publishing truthful information is a dangerous path for a democracy to take."

On Twitter, the Wikileaks account pointed to a memo it had put out in 2012. "Confidential emails obtained from the US private intelligence firm Stratfor show that the United States Government has had a secret indictment against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for more than 12 months," that memo claimed.

FREE MINDS

First Amendment lawsuit updates. A federal judge just ruled to let a lawsuit go forward against the publisher of the neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer.

The NRA's 1st Amendment lawsuit against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is also allowed to move forward.

And today, a judge is expected to rule on whether the Trump administration acted illegally in revoking the White House press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta.

FREE MARKETS

Occupational licensing costs 2 million jobs annually, says study. Research from the Institute for Justice attempts to quantify the economic costs of occupational licensing. "Not only do state occupational licensing laws force people to spend a lot of time and money earning a license instead of earning a living, they also impose real economic costs," the institute reports.

In researching licensing laws in 36 states, it found that "states vary widely in the share of workers licensed, from 14 percent in Georgia to 27 percent in Nevada. At the national level, nearly 20 percent of workers are now licensed, up from just 5 percent in the early 1950s." These barriers come at the price of about 2 million jobs annually, according to the study (with state job losses ranging from near 7,000 in Rhode Island to nearly 196,000 in California).

In addition, a "conservative measure of lost economic value" shows that "licensing may cost the national economy $6 billion." A broader and "likely more accurate measure suggests the true cost may reach $184 billion or more."

QUICK HITS

• Kamala Harris bought 1,100 ads asking people to "protect Mueller" via "emergency legislation".

• Construction workers have the highest suicide rates.

• Ohio Republicans are once again trying to make a ban on abortion after six weeks happen.

• International politics professor Daniel Drezner on why he's "starting to worry about the dollar."

• Facebook and Instagram are getting the Backpage treatment. ""For years now, Facebook and Instagram platforms has permitted sex traffickers unfiltered access to the most vulnerable members of society," say lawyers for a Jane Doe suing the company.

• Election officials in Florida have ordered a manual recount of ballots in the U.S. Senate race between Democrat Bill Nelson and Republican Rick Scott.

• Students and parents at a Colorado charter school are suing after some students were diciplined for liking Facebook posts critical of the school's CEO.

Photo Credit: Neil Hall/REUTERS/Newscom

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  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Kamala Harris bought 1,100 ads asking people to "protect Mueller" via "emergency legislation".

    She can't live in advertisements.

  • ||

    Hello.

    Over/under Assange turns himself in. He has to be about as exhausted as a cheetah chasing a gazelle at this point.

  • Weigel's Cock Ring||

    If he turns himself in he's a dead man.

    It was Seth Rich who provided him with the documents, and no doubt he can prove it, which would also give even the most stupid people a pretty good idea of who murdered him.

  • ||

    Stupid question: Why can't he do it now?

  • loveconstitution1789||

    You always need leverage to trade for your life.

    Assange does not strike as a super brave person but he seems savvy. A savvy person would keep some dangerous documents in reserve against your assassins.

  • Anomalous||

    Shouldn't his name have an L at the end?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Come to think of it, why is she buying ads? Is she asking the people to somehow pass legislation? Isn't that what California elected her to do? Sigh, time to read the article, I guess.

  • OpenBordersLiberal-tarian||

    Kamala Harris is doing what any patriotic American should be doing — #Resisting the Russian intelligence asset who stole the 2016 election. She was already my top choice for President in 2020, and this brave act only reinforces that.

    #ItsMuellerTime
    #TrumpRussia
    #LibertariansForHarris

  • Don't look at me!||

    Meesa propose that the council grant temporary emergency powers to chancellor Harris.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    GET OUT OF HERE WITH THAT REFERENCE

  • Don't look at me!||

    What does it say about you that you got it?

  • 68W58||

    I like the cut of this JarJar's jib.

  • Eddy||

    "Meesa got good intentions."

  • bevis the lumberjack||

    "Come to think of it, why is she buying ads? Is she asking the people to somehow pass legislation? "

    She's from California, so the thinks everything is done by Proposition?

  • Eddy||

    "Which used to be true." /Harvey Weinstein

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    US Department of Justice 'accidentally reveals existence of sealed charges (or a draft for them) against WikiLeaks' publisher Julian Assange in apparent cut-and-paste error in an unrelated case also at the Eastern District of Virginia...

    Cut and paste??? They really should be copying and pasting.

  • Don't look at me!||

    Lazy and sloppy work. And these are our TOP MEN.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    You should see what TOP WOMEN do.

  • Anomalous||

    I have, but it's NSFW.

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    The DOJ is trying to make WikiLeaks obsolete by leaking their own work. That'll show 'em.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    +1

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    • Election officials in Florida have ordered a manual recount of ballots in the U.S. Senate race between Democrat Bill Nelson and Republican Rick Scott.

    This sounds like another jobs program run amok.

  • Jerryskids||

    That would be a Manuel recount.

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    I don't understand the obsession with manual recounts. If there is one thing a computer is good at its counting. I could see you trying to get more votes included, but a manual vote seems likely to be worse.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    I think that's the idea. Some ballots are likely rejected by the computer.

    The whole voting machinery is pathetically outdated. Why can't we implement a blockchain-based method? Give every registered voted a public-private key and set up a blockchain to record their vote. Everyone could vote from their phone, everyone could confirm their vote was counted correctly, and the vote could could be immediate after voting is closed.

  • Bubba Jones||

    Does that work on my jitterbug?

  • ||

    Nice thought, but how does that include all the homeless bums that various activists use to vote their vote totals?

    Or, for that matter, the huge number of, well, just plain ordinary folks that wouldn't know a blockchain from a bicycle chain?

    And for those who do understand, you are dealing here with massive amounts of trust her. There are huge numbers of people (on both, well, actually the many, sides) who don't trust anyone, especially at the many levels required in this one.

    First, who says the hardware is trustworthy? Second,, who says the software is trustworthy?

  • 0x1000||

    The point of a Blockchain is to decentralize trust. Those issues are currently centralized, with the only resolution being to ask the state if their election results are trustworthy.

    A blockchain would allow those with keys (which could just be a receipt with a QR code or something) to verify their vote was counted properly, and, assuming others' votes are recorded properly as well, the whole tally is valid. It's a way of mathematically proving that a process happened the way it was recorded, without opening it to tampering.

    Which is probably as good a reason as any that it'll never happen (at least not in the us)

  • ||

    A blockchain would allow those with keys....


    But, what about those without keys? You see where this is going, don't you?

    At one extreme, there are those who'll question "who is giving out the keys?" at the other there will be those who wonder where the keys are.

  • MatthewSlyfield||

    "blockchain from a bicycle chain?"

    A block chain, isn't that the chains some businesses string across the entrances to their parking lots when they aren't open for business?

  • prolefeed||

    I could see you trying to get more votes included, but a manual vote seems likely to be worse.

    The person who lost both the original count and the machine recount wants partisan election officials to look at double votes and no votes, in the hope that they can proclaim enough of those as votes for the losing politician.

    The "keep counting until you win, then stop counting" strategy.

  • ||

    In order for the computer to count a ballot the mark must be made somewhat exactly; ie in mast cases completely filling in an oval-shaped box next to the candidates name with the pen provided by the election officials.

    In a perfect world all voters would have the intellectual capacity to follow the simple (well, to most of us, that is) instructions to voters but, alas, ever since they allowed the lower orders to vote some people do not and do everything from putting check marks or dots or dashes or whatever (inside or outside the box) to using their own pens to mark the ballots. These marks are not recognizable to the simple-minded machine.

    Hand recounts are intended to subject such informal ballots to scrutiny to attempt to discern whether such informal marks represent a clear unambiguous choice. Such scrutiny is supposed to include representatives from all parties with final arbitration made by a (supposedly) impartial judge. Such marks are credited to the candidate and are included in his or her count in spite of the fact that the computer does not recognize them as votes.

    In olden days of hand counted paper ballots the same method was used in very close races to determine the winner. in the same way, the instructions said to put an X in the box "highly individualistic" voters might put a check mark or something else to show their choice. Even the simple-minded have a right to representation or, at least, that's what our national mythology says. :)

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    And today, a judge is expected to rule on whether the Trump administration acted illegally in revoking the White House press credentials of CNN reporter Jim Acosta.

    The First Amendment explicitly states that once you get credentials you get them for life.

  • creech||

    Yes, and H&R commenters should be getting press credentials too so we can do some of the investigating that "real" journalists are supposed to do. How dare the local mayor or council president bar us from attending meetings.

  • Drave Robber||

    What is a more libertarian way to distribute press credentials (or any other limited access) - auction or lottery?

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    At the practical level, this one seems a toss-up.

    If the Acosta ban stands, why not expect a ban of the entirety of the Fox-Sinclair-Daily Caller-Breitbart-Stormfront-CBN-Newsmax class of right-wing sycophants during administrations not animated by intolerance, ignorance, backwardness, and conservative polemics?

    If Acosta is entitled to recover his hard pass, the relevant people and institutions would likely to continue to operate in the traditional, sensible manner, especially after a couple of years.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    The previous administration attempted a de facto ban on Fox News, but that lasted about as long as Anita Dunn's tenure there. I imagine Acosta will again grace the halls of wherever they house the press corps these days. Trump's pressers will feel empty without his court jester.

  • TrickyVic (old school)||

    Don't confuse banning an individual with banning the organization they work for. The Whitehouse should be able to dismiss reporters they find disruptive. The news agency can send someone else.

    If Trump wanted to ban CNN, I would have a issue. Trump revoking the privilege of having a WH press pass to a hostile disruptive reporter doesn't bother me.

    ""If Acosta is entitled to recover his hard pass, the relevant people and institutions would likely to continue to operate in the traditional, sensible manner, especially after a couple of years."'

    I disagree. If Acosta is able to get his press pass back after acting in non-traditional, non-sensible manner it will just enable more of it. Or as RC Dean would have said, you get more of what you reward.

  • Mickey Rat||

    Your question presumes Acosta was not conducting himself in an unacceptably unprofessional manner. He was not banned for who he was, he was banned for monopolizing the conference and behaving childishly towards the intern.

  • ||

    Point of interest. Kamala Harris:

    "This is an inflection moment, I believe, in the history of our country. This is a moment where there are powerful voices trying to sow hate and division among us. And if we're going to deal with where we are at this inflection moment, we must speak all these truths, and one of the most significant and important truths right now is also that the vast majority of us have so much more in common than what separates us and let's speak and own that truth, in particular, in the face of those who are trying to have us point fingers at each other and divide us. Let's speak these truths."

    On division: Now go harass Tucker Carlson some more because resist! When they go high, you go low! Wait a second....

    On grammar: Inflection.

    "a change in the form of a word (typically the ending) to express a grammatical function or attribute such as tense, mood, person, number, case, and gender."

    And they say conservatives are illiterate.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    TOP WOMEN.

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    Tell us the truth LC... Kamala Harris: would you?

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Let me go find a picture of her...nope.

    If I am going to put my dick into crazy, they need to be insanely hawt.

    That bitch is an attorney, a Democrat, a socialist, and a politician.

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    I'm with you. Harris is kind of like a moped. Might be fun to ride, but you wouldn't want to risk your friends finding out about it.

    Occasio-Cortez on the other hand. I would fuck her brains out, but apparently someone beat me to it.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Hahaha, nice, Leo. With those chompers, though, I would be careful about receiving.

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    Like a horse eating a carrot.

  • ||

    She strikes me as someone who would bag the cum and sell it.

  • Bubba Jones||

    I dunno. A lifetime gubment job as her pool boy...

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Then you would have to fish out all the bull crap that comes out of her into the pool.

  • Dillinger||

    billion hotter women on this planet.

  • Anomalous||

    If you don't, they'll top you.

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    And they say conservatives are illiterate.


    The definition of inflection provided first by Merriam-Webster:

    ": the act or result of curving or bending"

    Watching half-educated right-wingers take a moment away from ranting about "elites" (with their graduate degrees, professional careers, education-driven achievements, and fancy standard English) to offer misguided swipes at their betters' literacy is instructive, amusing, and entertaining.
  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    What about HTML failures?

  • Aloysious||

    Allow me to deploy my two favorite excuses:

    1. "That's different."

    2. "Because."

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    This is the NPC response of most partisans on this site. Whenever someone points out that the two sides are equally atrocious, someone, usually a right-winger, as currently they predominate, will jump in to explain how the two examples are not equivalent at all and how one is much worse than the other. John is the master of taking this bait.

  • Hoofddorp Haarlemmermeer||

    No, my Progressive-leaning acquaintances always jump in to say what a better world it would be if we'd all shut up and listen to them, because they're correct you know.

    A pox on both their houses; feel free to substitute any other Old Testament-type retribution.

  • Azathoth!!||

    Precisely.

    Everyone knows an armed mob trying to break down the door of your home is EXACTLY THE SAME as someone calling your employer and asking them to be connected to your dead body.

    Exactly the same.

  • Drave Robber||

    (mathematics) A change in curvature from concave to convex or from convex to concave.

    What she's saying is that the second derivative of history is zero at this point. Not sure what it means in practical terms. :)

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    I believe the jerks are jouncing.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    That would mean we are locked in at a constant rate of change, which seems unlikely. Rather, the rate of change of the rate of change appears to be positive.

  • ||

    She's saying that the navel of this great country is changing from innie to outie.

  • OpenBordersLiberal-tarian||

    Construction workers have the highest suicide rates.

    That's unfortunate. Although I'm an intersectional feminist who wants equal gender representation in most jobs, I hereby retract my previous support for policies to get more women into construction. That's one job I'm content to leave overwhelmingly male.

  • lap83||

    Excellent. You also could've added something about how they are probably overcome with guilt by all the catcalling

  • Dillinger||

    >>>Construction workers have the highest suicide rates.

    labeled suicides to avoid wrongful death payouts.

  • Conchfritters||

    "The government bringing criminal charges against someone for publishing truthful information is a dangerous path for a democracy to take."

    I was always told that the truth will set you free?

  • Shirley Knott||

    No, no, it's work that does that.
    Says so right on the gates.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    The NRA's 1st Amendment lawsuit against New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is also allowed to move forward.

    But it can only be loaded up with a maximum of seven motions, even if the plaintiff's briefcase can hold ten or more.

  • Anomalous||

    But the plaintiff can have multiple briefcases, which can be switched out rapidly.

  • Ken Shultz||

    Assange and Snowden both committed the unpardonable sin--embarrassing Barack Obama. It won't be ironic to see the left suddenly rush to their defense if and when the Trump administration prosecutors them, not if by "ironic" we mean "unexpected".

  • Don't look at me!||

    No high power assault lawyers with the thing that goes up.

  • Don't look at me!||

    Oops, wrong spot.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    I'm adding this anyway.

    Who is going to register the irony piercing pens?

  • Hoofddorp Haarlemmermeer||

    Semi-automatic or fully-automatic assault lawyers?

  • Don't look at me!||

    In America, we have the right to free speech. Anyone can write any silly stupid thing they please, without the fear of government intervention. See the above post for an example.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Buttplugger gave up on replying to others. He decided to reply to the voices in his head.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Poor Buttplugger had to go against his own voices.

  • Drave Robber||

    So dead people not only vote twice, they post on Daily Stormer, too? I'm confused.

  • vek||

    I went to the Daily Stormer once to see what all the fuss was about... What a lot of people seem to miss is that it's basically a joke/satire/troll site.

    It's not supposed to be taken TOO seriously. Yes, it's run by people who are racist or at least race realists or whatever... Yes, they rail on minorities all the time. But it's closer to The Onion than it is to a Nazi CNN.

    All I know is a bunch of the articles I saw the time I went there had me rolling! LOL Much of it was obviously over the top. A lot of the rest was just sort of knocking certain minority groups for stuff everybody knows is true... But isn't allowed to be said in polite society. YES, black people DO commit 50% of murders in the US every year, and commit all other crimes at sky high rates. So they call them savages/DINDUs/etc. It's not nice, but not far from the truth either...

    I mean it's not the kind of thing that's polite, but it's not seriously calling for whacking all the Jews or anything either. That's more Storm Front style I do believe.

  • Bubba Jones||

    I dunno. Hard to separate reality from parody sometimes.

    I stumbled across a stormfront forum when I was researching .22 rifles. Neo nazis have a hard on for .22 rifles.

  • Don't look at me!||

    I suppose the civilized thing to do would be to shout them out of a restaurant.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Occupational licensing costs 2 million jobs annually, says study.

    But they save countless monopolies. Well, you actually can count them, but you know what I mean.

  • Inigo Montoya||

    What is Assange being charged with, just outing Hillary's mishandling of classified info? Is that really his "crime" — good old-fashioned whistleblowing?

  • Ken Shultz||

    People died because Assange told people the truth is the argument.

    We can't have people just going around exposing the truth all willy nilly. How's a government supposed to engage in noble lies when the truth is out there just waiting to be exposed by people like Julian Assange?

  • Inigo Montoya||

    That almost makes me wish I was a lawyer, because I would have fun ridiculing the government's argument in a courtroom. That sort of specious reasoning could be used to cover up any kind of wrongdoing whatsoever.

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    That sort of specious reasoning could be used to cover up any kind of wrongdoing whatsoever.

    It's a feature, not a bug.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    You would have to be a brave lawyer too.

    Remember, government controls the licensing of lawyers so they threaten you with disbarment if you speak to harshly of TOP MEN and their noble lies.

  • Hoofddorp Haarlemmermeer||

    Especially when the government can fuck up on its own? See Thirty spies dead after Iran cracked CIA comms network with Google search for a big oopsie.

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    It seems strange that Mr. Mueller would safeguard his investigation's information, strategy, and conclusions so carefully in other contexts yet share evidence and work product with Reason.com commenters.

  • Ken Shultz||

    My derp detector is going haywire with this comment.

  • markm23||

    And the other question: What gives the USA jurisdiction over what a foreigner did in other countries? Is there a principle by which the USA can prosecute Assange, that doesn't also give China jurisdiction to prosecute a CIA analyst for receiving and disseminating Chinese secrets?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    For years now, Facebook and Instagram platforms has permitted sex traffickers unfiltered access to the most vulnerable members of society...

    And don't even get me started about the damage the First Amendment and women's agency has done.

  • Conchfritters||

    Election officials in Florida have ordered a manual recount of ballots in the U.S. Senate race between Democrat Bill Nelson and Republican Rick Scott.

    Hanging chads hardest hit. FFS Florida, get your shit together.

  • bevis the lumberjack||

    Florida could save themselves some effort and save everybody else a bunch of angst in the future by just skipping the original count and going straight to recount.

  • Don't look at me!||

    Or skip counting altogether and just publish the desired result.

  • Anomalous||

    Result first, tabulation later.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Chad doesn't mean what it used to anymore.

  • Shirley Knott||

    Now suitable for hanging.

  • TrickyVic (old school)||

    Every time Chad tells someone his name, they always ask if he's from Florida.

  • Rat on a train||

    Pentagon failed its first audit. It is partly my fault. I took an Abrams home when I left.

  • Anomalous||

    That was silly. Don't you know they start depreciating the minute you drive them off the lot?

  • Don't look at me!||

    And the gas mileage is terrible.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Technically, you can run an M1 on almost any flammable fuel, including kerosene, diesel, jet fuel, and alcohol.

  • ||

    Does it run on peanut butter?

    :)

  • Rat on a train||

    I have a hybrid that ups the normal 2 gpm to 1 mpg. It still costs over $1,000 to top off.

  • gaoxiaen||

    I've read somewhere that it can run on 80 proof liquor and vegetable oil.

  • lap83||

    We could also blame you for global warming and bad traffic

  • Hank Phillips||

    That Ohio thing is simply another attempted reversion to the Comstock Laws banning all birth control--including calendar-watching. Ask anyone in Ohio how many persons are added to the world's population every day. The blank stare is courtesy of Creation Pseudoscience replacing mathematics under faith-based subsidies instituted by the Bush Dynasty.

  • Mock-star||

    I took alot of math courses and know pretty much nothing about Creation Pseudoscience, and you would get a blank stare from me if you walked up to me and asked how many persons are added to the world's population every day.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    The House GOP Just Got a Whole Lot Trumpier

    This Lefty writer sees the reality behind the Lefty propaganda.

    "Under normal circumstances, a midterm loss would chasten a party and cause them to reevaluate their direction and possibly move to the center. In this case, however, a smaller caucus is actually a bolder, Trumpier, caucus.

    Republicans lost control of the House on Tuesday. And Trump won control of the Republican House. Maybe it was worth it to him? He has his team now. "

    Many of the RINOs that did not support Trump lost their House seats.

  • Red Rocks White Privilege||

    Yeah, the irony of the "suburban revolt" is that the reps who were more likely to push back against Trump's agenda were the ones who got their clocks cleaned.

    Those same districts will probably go back to being Republican again if a Democrat takes the White House in 2020, especially if it's a balloon-head like Harris or Booker.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Kamela Harris and Cory Booker would never win the Presidency. They're too Commifornia and too Jewsey.

    Those House seats lost this election might stay Democrat. Until Census 2020 takes House seats from Blue states and hands them to Red states. Georgia is picking up a few House seats and Texas is surely having the same happen.

    The reality is that RINOs were blocking Trump rollback plans anyway, so losing the House is not the worse thing ever. New Republican politicians hopefully will be more conservative, so any majority results in massive rollbacks.

    This elections shows that working with Democrats is no guarantee to keep your Congressional seat. So why do it. In fact, Democrat Joe Manchin likely only kept his Senate seat because he worked with Trump to confirm Kavanaugh. The media refuses to discuss this point.

  • Bubba Jones||

    See also the 1994 AWB that killed the Democrats, but empowered Feinstein.

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    It's the same as bright flight -- the better people depart, leaving behind a disaffected human residue of concentrated dysfunction, ignorance, and intolerance.

    Should work as well for House Republicans as it has for every can't-keep-up hamlet in America.

  • Sevo||

    Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland|11.16.18 @ 10:33AM|#
    "It's the same as bright flight -- the better people depart, leaving behind a disaffected human residue of concentrated dysfunction, ignorance, and intolerance."

    And here you remain!

  • TrickyVic (old school)||

    What motivates bright flight?

    You might call them bright but they fail to understand they are the cause for the reasons they choose to leave.

  • Sevo||

    Posted last night after returning from the fun, but let's do it again:
    Attended a business anniversary celebration in downtown SF last night. From a couple of miles south of downtown, the entire skyline was made invisible by the smoke from the wild fires all day today. On the ride down the Embarcadero, the street lights seemed shrouded in fog. That ain't fog.
    For the last several years, those in the central valley in particular have been treated to air of a quality that the Celestials in Beijing would find unacceptable, and I don't blame them. The fires have put far more pollutants and CO^2 into the atmosphere than any of those fossil fuel sources which moonbeam fantasizes could be outlawed would possibly deliver. We need look no further; we (and those in the central valley) can thank moonbeam, his idiot tree-huggers and his D legislature(s) for it. To be clear, his idiocy negates and reverses any *possible* gain he might have hoped to accomplish. Stupidity trumps 'good intentions', in this way:
    Moonbeam and the tree-huggers more or less outlawed logging (spotted owls and all that shit – I'm told they taste like chicken). When the loggers left, they also took forest management skills with them; the forests were left to return to their *pristine*, fuel-packed state, and the tree-huggers were thrilled.

  • Sevo||

    (more)
    Given the demands on the state budget to support the union benes (Dills Act; stuff it up your ass, moonbeam), money to manage the forests was every bit as available as money to, oh, maintain infrastructure (Oroville Dam, anyone?) or maybe build some sort of water storage facilities as the population doubled over the last 30 years? Ha and ha!
    So as a result we get TV spots of that fucking left-over hippy moonbeam whining about 'climate change' and encouraging all of his 'subjects' to don a hair-shirt in support of his wonderfulness in 'saving the world'. For the SEIU…
    But wait! There's more!
    SF is not alone in nearly outlawing increased housing density as a result of the D-dominated BoS, CC, etc; any whiner can stop any development for years, adding costs and delays which, as most of you understand, lead to capital being used for other purposes.
    So where do those who voted D all this time but want to avoid the regulation aggro and cash out of the (distorted) market go on retirement? Why, they move to towns like Paradise, where the cost of housing is reasonable, since that forest behind you hasn't been cleaned out in the last 50 years. But, if you are a CA - D voter, you think that the government will keep you safe and sound! Of course you do! You're a CA - D voter!

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Even funnier is that Lefties in California are squawking about the heat while almost the entire rest of the USA is getting winter storms.

    Maybe its California being built largely on a irrigated desert and super old forests that is the problem. Maybe its all the Lefty Smug that is suffocating California.

    See if you had plastic straws, you could fashion a breathing tube to draw in clean air above the smoke.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Do they perform controlled burns periodically in California? That's what needs to be done so that the combustible wood does not build up to dangerous levels. Fire is natural and needs to happen periodically in many ecosystems.

  • Sevo||

    Chipper Morning Baculum|11.16.18 @ 10:50AM|#
    "Do they perform controlled burns periodically in California?"
    No.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Seriously? That is retarded. I thought at least at the federal level, the Forest Service realized that Smokey is a dumbass and that controlled burns are necessary.

  • Sevo||

    "Lack Of Controlled Burns Contributing To California Wildfires"
    [...]
    "(KPIX 5) — California's devastating wildfires have been fueled by drought, heat and what Calfire calls missed opportunities to clear overgrown forests.
    Controlled burns, fuel load, vegetation management – these are buzz words being thrown around the state capital right now. While the state is making all that a priority, the fact of the matter is it hasn't for decades and we are dealing with the consequences.
    The new normal California faces is a year-round fire season. But if you ask any fire official, these flames are fueled by more than hotter, drier weather. They're also fueled by unchecked growth.
    "After aggressively suppressing fires for the last 100 years we have put our forests in a state of peril," said Calfire Chief Thom Porter.
    As a result, our communities are also in peril. It's a situation largely of our own making, says Calfire."
    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2018/08/03
    /lack-of-controlled-burns-contributing
    -to-california-wildfires/

    Why, it's almost like that asshole moonbeam (and company) *designed* the place to burn down, and there's moonbeam again, whining about 'climate change!!!'.

  • Don't look at me!||

    Lol, no you can't burn things in California.
    Except marijuana, that's ok now.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Remember the push to get filters on cigs too?

    Joints don't have filters and that's okay.

  • Dillinger||

    >>>Joints don't have filters

    pre-rolled ones do. Colorado friend showed me.

  • Ska||

    The ones the size of small carrots and covered in kief? Those things are amazing.

  • Sevo||

    (finally)
    Do I have to connect all the dots? Naah; here's some reality: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajPpP3vbD5c

  • 68W58||

    Interesting-Adam Carolla has been talking about the fires and lambasting Cali lawmakers by pointing out that the could have bought a fleet of fire control C-139s for a fraction of what has been spent on the "high-speed rail" project.

  • 68W58||

    "C-130s"

  • Sevo||

    That don't feed the SEIU bulldog.

  • ||

    See, herein lies much of the fundamental problem. 'We" live in a society with a "republican form of government", which means technically that each of us is entitled to have a representative who will speak for us to express our wishes and grievances etc in the public forum.

    But who represents the illiterate, the ignorant or the shut-in who cannot get to the polling place or, having got there does not understand the verbal instructions or the written instructions on the ballot paper etc.

    Some of us would have a literacy or competency test to prescreen those who should be permitted to vote. But that would open the gates for various maleficent people to obstruct potential voters through subjective testing or outright fraudulently failing test takers. Others feel that there should be no limitation at all and that those with limitations should get be able to get some kind of "public assistance" to help them cast their ballots. This, on the other hand, opens the door to all kinds of mischief, including but not limited to guiding the voters hand to the "right" place on the ballot to make a mark. There are, in fact, actual cases where this has happened in Assisted Living Facilities. Others see the ballot process as working just fine. As long as a ballot is marked according to the instructions it indicates a clear indication of a rational voter's intent.

  • ||

    OK, squirrels put that comment there. I was actually responding to a comment that was relevant to that reply.

  • Rich||

    The New York Times speculates that the Assange arrest language may have been lifted from a draft motion and no actual charges against Assange brought to a grand jury yet.

    "The New York Times speculates that the Assange arrest language may have been lifted from a classified e-mail on Hillary's server ...."

    "The New York Times speculates that the Assange arrest language may have been lifted from a satirical article in The Onion ...."

    "The New York Times speculates that the Assange arrest language may have been lifted from an earlier screed in The New York Times ...."

  • jello.beyonce||

    There are no such things as "Free Markets".
    Markets are ALWAYS manipulated by someone or something.

    GUARANTEED, THOSE CALLING MOST FOR "FREE MARKETS" (DEREGULATIONS) WILL BE THOSE FIRST COMPLAINING OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE LACK OF REGULATIONS.

    Current ICO class action lawsuits are evidence.
    The fact that cryptocurrency lawsuits have TRIPLED from 2017-2018 is evidence.

    The SEC has appointed a "Crypto Tsar" due to the rising number of complaints FROM BUYERS, FORMER SUPPORTERS, OF UNREGULATED CRYPTO'S.

    The National Currency Act in 1863, and eventually the FDIC was a result of a high rate of "wildcat" bank failures starting with the national bank panic in 1837.

    Licensing regimes have an ancient lineage.
    Medieval guilds limited entry into various occupations, while the 13th and 14th centuries saw elementary forms of medical licensing in Germany, Naples, Sicily, and Spain.
    The American Colonies subjected bakers, ferry services, innkeepers, lawyers, leather merchants, and peddlers to early forms of regulation.
    In 19th century America, states and localities licensed barbers, embalmers, ferry operators, horseshoers, boarding house operators, insurance agents, midwives, pawnbrokers, physicians, real estate brokers, steamboat operators, taverns, undertakers, veterinarians, and anyone who did business with the Indian tribes.

    As the old saying goes, YOU'VE GOT TO BE CAREFUL WHAT YOU ASK FOR.

  • jello.beyonce||

    Read "The Great American Fraud" by Samuel Hopkins Adams. Deaths, drug addictions, and injuries to a rising number of people consuming fraudulent patent medicines led to the first Pure Food and Drug Act in 1906.

    WHILST IT'S GOOD TO QUESTION EVERYTHING, DOING SO IN A REASONABLE MANNER, AND ACCEPTING UNFAVORABLE EVIDENCE CONTRARY TO YOUR OPINIONS IS PART OF THAT RESPONSIBILITY.

    NOT EVERY REGULATION IS BAD. MANY ARE FOUNDED ON SOUND PRINCIPLES.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    "Free market" doesn't mean a market free from manipulation. It mean a market free from government coercion outside of enforcement of contracts and private property rights. Now, you could argue that the private property rights were illegitimately acquired, but that is another discussion.

  • Sevo||

    jello.beyonce|11.16.18 @ 10:46AM|#
    "There are no such things as "Free Markets".
    Markets are ALWAYS manipulated by someone or something."
    You should learn what something means before you start typing and demonstrate your imbecility.

    "GUARANTEED, THOSE CALLING MOST FOR "FREE MARKETS" (DEREGULATIONS) WILL BE THOSE FIRST COMPLAINING OF THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE LACK OF REGULATIONS."
    Oh, LOOK! Fucking lefty ignoramus makes claim, therefore it must be true!
    Ask mommy for more cookies and fuck off.

  • Ken Shultz||

    There is no such thing as a perfect justice system, so I guess we might as well just give up on justice?

    There will always be rapes, robberies, and murders, so we might as well not bother prosecuting criminals?

    Logic fail.

    "The perfect solution fallacy is a related informal fallacy that occurs when an argument assumes that a perfect solution exists or that a solution should be rejected because some part of the problem would still exist after it were implemented.[4]"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/N.....on_fallacy

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    Just gonna shill for this right now:

    Andrew Heaton has a new podcast. He was a beloved comedy figure here at Reason in the last year. Reason, in order to pay for KMW's 10 kilo a day cocaine habit, let him go from here. I've been following him, and now he's doing a new podcast. It's a bit rough so far, but check it out. It's free, and he seems to be trying to do it daily, which is absurd.

    Finally, to Reason. Bring him and Siskind back you fucking assholes.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Great find, BUCS! Thanks!

  • ||

    Didn't realize they let him go.

    But we still have...Dalmia.

  • Jerryskids||

    I've noticed Reason doesn't have a problem tacking Heaton re-runs onto their articles - Remy and Heaton are half the reason to come here. (John and LC1789 are the other half - ten times the commentary, one-tenth the wit.)

  • Ken Shultz||

    "The number of Central American families with children arriving at the U.S. border seeking asylum has surged in recent years—and they keep coming, as more migrant caravans make their way through Mexico.

    Having children in tow can be a successful tactic because of American immigration rules. Families from crime-ridden Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador are able to gain entry by demonstrating a credible fear of returning home.

    Then, as they wait for court hearings on their asylum claims in a process that can take years, most are released into the U.S. because of a 20-day limit on detaining minors; an adult traveling alone could be detained much longer.

    Doris Paz, a 29-year-old mother of three, said that is how her sister-in-law reached San Antonio. It is how a neighbor recently crossed into the U.S. with two children. It is why a cousin grabbed her children and joined a caravan of migrants that left Honduras last month. And it is why Ms. Paz joined the same caravan with her 6-year-old son."

    ----WSJ

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/mi.....542376796?

  • Ken Shultz||

    On the one hand, we call CPS when people let their kids walk home alone from school. On the other hand, we let immigrants off the hook for putting their children in what appears to be far greater danger?

    At the very least, they're abusing our compassion for suffering children. I don't think you can both use your children in such a manipulative way and also win my sympathy for having them with you.

  • ||

    OTOH, part of the reasons that whole families are arriving is attributed by some to the "tightening" of the border.

    Time was that most Mexican (and other Central American) illegals came over as single individuals to earn the "big American dollars" for a few years. Men came to work in construction or as agricultural laborers, women as domestics or also as agricultural laborers. They had no interest in becoming permanent residents and even less in becoming citizens.

    Before LBJ's 1965 Immigration Act immigration fro boh Mexico and Canada had no quotas. IOW anyone who showed up at the border could apply and as soon as they were processed they would be issued a Green Card and as soon they had lived a statutory required length of time they could apply for citizenship and be naturalized. Even in those days there was a "wetback problem"; ie a problem of border crossers who did not want to become permanent residents but, instead, just wanted to live and work here a few years to send some money "back home" and eventually after the family had saved enough to go back and build a house and maybe start a small business.

    What the 1965 Act and to a further extent the Reagan era Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 did was to make it more difficult for these transient workers to go back to their families etc. Hence since that time, more and more of these otherwise transient short termers have been bringing their families along.

  • ||

    OTOH, part of the reasons that whole families are arriving is attributed by some to the "tightening" of the border.

    Time was that most Mexican (and other Central American) illegals came over as single individuals to earn the "big American dollars" for a few years. Men came to work in construction or as agricultural laborers, women as domestics or also as agricultural laborers. They had no interest in becoming permanent residents and even less in becoming citizens.

    Before LBJ's 1965 Immigration Act immigration fro boh Mexico and Canada had no quotas. IOW anyone who showed up at the border could apply and as soon as they were processed they would be issued a Green Card and as soon they had lived a statutory required length of time they could apply for citizenship and be naturalized. Even in those days there was a "wetback problem"; ie a problem of border crossers who did not want to become permanent residents but, instead, just wanted to live and work here a few years to send some money "back home" and eventually after the family had saved enough to go back and build a house and maybe start a small business.

    What the 1965 Act and to a further extent the Reagan era Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 did was to make it more difficult for these transient workers to go back to their families etc. Hence since that time, more and more of these otherwise transient short termers have been bringing their families along.

  • Jerryskids||

    Facebook and Instagram are getting the Backpage treatment. ""For years now, Facebook and Instagram platforms has permitted sex traffickers unfiltered access to the most vulnerable members of society," say lawyers for a Jane Doe suing the company.

    Had to scroll up to see who was posting this - as the black hole of government persecution expands it's going to be sucking in more and more of the further-flung objects orbiting the "sex trafficking epidemic" and if I were ENB I'd be thinking about maybe adopting a nom de plume. ENB may not be near the top of the Witch List, but I'd bet she and Reason are on the subsidiary list of Witch Enablers.

  • Dillinger||

    >>>'accidentally reveals existence of sealed charges (or a draft for them)

    'cause that happens.

  • Jerryskids||

    I suspect it might have been "accidentally" - they know they're going to have a hard time putting Assange behind bars by way of a black-bag op because there's too damn many people watching but they certainly can threaten him.

  • Dillinger||

    "they" should let it go.

  • Hoofddorp Haarlemmermeer||

    A minor gripe, but it is snowing here and I'm grumpier than usual.

    "Students and parents at a Colorado charter school are suing after some students were diciplined for liking Facebook posts critical of the school's CEO."

    diciplined? disciplined. FFS doesn't anyone employ editors any more?

  • Dillinger||

    argument against editors (which burns my soul) is "you got it, even though it was misspelled"

    snow should = happy.

  • Riesen||

    Hey, it's ENB. For all we know, she may have meant for it to say "dickiplined".

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    Is Sen. Kamala Harris Running In 2020? Ask The 1,100 Facebook Ads She Just Bought.

    Russian bots.

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