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Texas Cops Charge 'Child Sex Trafficking Victim' With Felony

They also arrested her younger friend for prostitution.

Ingram Publishing/NewscomIngram Publishing/NewscomThe cops of Harris County, Texas, routinely bust adult women and men in prostitution stings while assuring us it has to be done in order to find and save teens selling sex. So what happens when they find girls doing just that? Why, they arrest them too—and charge one with a felony.

It's yet another example of the disparity between what authorities say their priorities are and where their priorities evidently lie.

Police arrested the two teenagers on January 18, after the girls agreed to "perform a sex act" on an undercover officer for $100. The younger girl faces a misdemeanor prostitution charge. The older girl, age 17, is charged with promoting the prostitution of a minor, a second-degree felony. Police allege that she "coached" the younger teen on how to sell sex.

The older girl "stated that the [younger] girl needed help getting some money and she wanted to help because she had done prostitution in the past," according to the Harris Country District Attorney's Office.

The younger girl does not dispute this story, nor does she allege coercion on her friend's part. For all we know, the younger girl was determined to do this no matter what and the older girl's tips and presence were offered to help keep her safe.

And of course the older girl is still underage herself—a former "child sex trafficking victim," in the county officials' usual parlance. She has mostly gotten out of prostitution and is now taking college classes and working a retail job. Nonetheless, Harris County has chosen to treat her as a predator.

This sort of thing is all too common in Harris County and its largest city, Houston. As The Texas Tribune noted last year, the cops there often put minors in jail for prostitution.

Texas has only one facility specifically for underage sex-trafficking victims, and even space at regular facilities for homeless youth is tight. Yet instead of devoting more money to things like shelters and services for these teens, both Texas and federal officials routinely devote their dollars to arrests instead. Until that changes, expect to see a lot more of Texas authorities giving these kids criminal records instead of the help they need.

Photo Credit: Ingram Publishing/Newscom

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  • Alan Vanneman||

    The police are afraid that, with marijuana becoming legal, they won't have anyone to arrest. And what safer bust is there than young women?

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    And what safer bust is there than young women?

    Anyone who's unarmed, really.

  • DFG||

    "Police arrested the two teenagers on January 18, after the girls agreed to "perform a sex act" on an undercover officer for $100. Once they finished police slapped the cuffs on them."

    I may have added a little to that.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Probably not, though.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Added a little to what? The price? The sex act? The arrest? Be specific, man.

  • Curly4||

    Yea and a statutory rape charge for the younger one also.

  • Quo Usque Tandem||

    Well now are you all for law and order or not? Moral high ground here, charge them with predation and send them to jail, that'll teach em! And we don't even have to think twice about it.

  • Fuck You - Cut Spending||

    is now taking college classes and working a retail job.

    So, state-approved whoring.

  • DajjaI||

    Also sometimes kids are tricked by a 'friend' into pimping them out. They think it's a joke or just doing a favor and suddenly they're facing a decade in prison.

  • Tony||

    Surely the pig went through with the sex act so as to have solid evidence. For America.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Well, liquid evidence.

  • Curly4||

    Are you jealous?!

  • FlameCCT||

    "She has mostly gotten out of prostitution and is now taking college classes and working a retail job. Nonetheless, Harris County has chosen to treat her as a predator."

    Is she not a predator? Did she not victimize the younger girl instead of directing her to the help that she once received?

    Or is your problem that Progressive Plantation Houston/Harris County are enforcing the law? Don't like the Progressive law(s) then change them instead of whining. After all, Progressives have controlled Houston/Harris County for decades!

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Unless she can turn invisible, she's probably not a predator.

  • DesigNate||

    How else is the state going to justify it's police budget?

  • DesigNate||

    How else is the state going to justify it's police budget?

  • DesigNate||

    Fuck you squirrels!

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Furk you, whare! Furk you, dorphin!

  • Rich||

    She has mostly gotten out of prostitution

    Merely haggling over the price?

  • Curly4||

    Just what should the police do. Prostitution is a crime under the current law so should the police treat in as a non crime as done with illegal immigrants when they are arrested in sanctuary cities. If so just how is going to help these teens not go into prostitution?

  • markm23||

    The cops should stop lying about what they do. They should stop pretending that throwing women in jail is helping them. They should stop re-defining "sex trafficking" to include women who chose to go for the easy money of prostitution, while helping those who campaign for more laws against prostitution under the claim that these women are slaves.

    And they should prioritize crimes with actual victims. In most cities, there are burglaries going uninvestigated while vice cops are getting blow jobs from teenagers. Your "it's a crime under the current law" argument carries no weight until the laws are reduced to the point that the cops can investigate _all_ crimes. They are choosing to ignore some crimes while trying to trap women into doing other crimes in front of them.

    As for helping teens not go into prostitution, how about doing something about the conditions at home that these teens are escaping?

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