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Man Jailed for Traffic Ticket Dies in Cell After 17 Days of Torture. Officers Watched It Happen.

Macomb County man David Stojcevski died of drug withdrawal and neglect as officials ignored his plight.

Macomb CountyLocal 4 / clickondetroitIt was a death sentence.

David Stojcevski, a 32-year-old resident of Roseville, Michigan, was arrested for failing to pay a $772 fine stemming from careless driving. A court ordered him to spend a month in the Macomb County jail.

Over the next 17 days of his incarceration in a brightly lit cell—where he was denied clothing—he lost 50 pounds, suffered convulsions, and eventually began to hallucinate. He died in agony, from a combination of obvious, untreated drug withdrawal and galling neglect.

Making matters worse (if anything could be worse than that), the entirety of his demise was captured on jail surveillance footage. Indeed, Stojcevski was under self-harm watch—stemming for a profound misdiagnosis of his condition, which was drug addiction, not mental instability—and jail officials were supposed to be watching him constantly. Either their vigilance was inadequate, or they watched and simply didn’t care.

WDIV's report on the story is a must-see, though it’s highly disturbing: the video shows clips from the jail footage while a medical expert offers commentary on the inhumanity of Stojcevski’s treatment.

Stojcevski was a drug addict, and was taking Methadone, Xanax, and Klonopin to treat his addiction. But without access to these prescriptions, he quickly went into withdrawal while in jail, according to WDIV's expert. Withdrawal caused him to behave irrationally, but jail officials ignored these obvious symptoms and instead placed him in a cell for the mentally unstable. He was stripped naked—so that he couldn’t hurt himself—and forced to languish under the unceasing bright lights (the jail doesn’t turn them off, even at night).

At one point, Stojcevski began fighting with another (naked) inmate, who was then moved out of the cell. Sometime later, completely alone, Stojcevski could be seen reenacting the fight—a clear sign of hallucination.

On his last day of life, the man refused to touch his food and was too weak to get up from the floor.

At the first, obvious sign of drug withdrawal, Stojcevski should have been given adequate medical treatment. He was not a violent criminal, or a danger to the public. He was a man who hadn’t paid a traffic ticket.

Stojcevski’s family is suing Macomb County. A lawyer for the county told WDIV that the suit “lacks legal merit,” and expects the family to lose when the case goes to trial. Macomb County has no plans to settle, according to the lawyer.

Photo Credit: Clickondetroit

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  • John C. Randolph||

    What's the name of that scumbag shyster who's claiming that the suit lacks merit?

    -jcr

  • Warren's Strapon||

    Chip Wood.

  • Je suis Woodchipper||

    hehehehe

  • RAHeinlein||

    Link to Macomb County Prosecutor's page - "your fighting team"

    http://prosecutorsmith.com/

    For additional details, see link to Drunk Driving Forfeiture Program

  • jrom||

    The cops, prosecutors, and judges must of had a good laugh about this guy dying in jail. They just love it!

  • ||

    Will any morally appalling cop-fellators show up to quibble with Robby's use of the word "torture"? Stay tuned.

  • Lee G||

    Procedures - followed

    BOOYAH

  • Almanian - Micro Trumper||

    We are WINNING!

  • hamilton||

    New professionalism etc etc.

  • Free Society||

    "YOU LEAVE HIM ALONE!"

  • WTF||

    HE CAUSED HIS OWN DEATH BY BREAKING THE LAW!!11!!!!

  • waffles||

    Is it really torture if you intend to kill the victim? No, it's more than torture. This is beyond sickening and is worse than the deaths in those cheesy Saw and Hostel movies. Even the killer in Se7en is more merciful than these cops.

  • Karl Hungus||

    Let me give it a shot:

    "If he didn't want to go to jail, he should've obeyed the law; if he didn't want to die of drug withdrawal, he should've stayed off the junk."

    Maybe throw in something about freedom and the "war on cops" for good measure.

  • MJGreen - Docile Citizen||

    Oh this is definitely Tulpa-bait. Did the police lay a hand on him? Were they actively inflicting pain?

    Also, what do you expect the government to do when someone owes hundreds of dollars in fines? Not imprison him?

  • keith2366||

    When someone owes the government hundreds of dollars in fines I do expect that the government to imprison him. Not kill him.

  • Muzzled Woodchipper||

    Thw government owes me thousands every year. I feel like the government should be jailed and left to die from the withdrawal of not being able to spend other people's money.

  • rocks||

    They did kill him, the withdrawal killed him.

    Reason is becoming just like the SJW crowd by using inflated language to make false statements.

    The police didn't abuse or torture him, they neglected him. That is a big difference, torture involves doing physical harm. Here they just left him alone.

    And he wasn't jailed for a traffic violation, he was jailed for not paying a large tico, again big difference.

  • rocks||

    Meant to say "they didn't kill him ..."

  • ThomasD||

    I'd agree that calling it torture is hyperbolic. But they did kill him. He had no means to take care of himself, and nobody else had access to him either - both due directly to his incarceration. That fact creates an obligation on the part of his captors to provide for his needs. They neglected those needs resulting in his death.

    Depraved indifference manslaughter is what I would call it.

  • rocks||

    Libertarians believe in individual liberty and freedom, which coupled with personal responsibility.

    He was provided with shelter, food, and yes basic medical care (against diseases for example) during his incarceration. The rest is up to him. If he was unable to take care of himself in a basic room with basic food, then that fall on him.

    Want people to have the freedom to take drugs? Well they also need to take personal responsibility for the after effects. His withdrawal was an after effect, one of his own choosing. Or does everyone who decides to get addicted to meth become a ward of the state and we need a new welfare program for that too.

  • Tituspullo||

    Oh bullshit. The guy was on prescription drugs for his condition. The authorities denied him that treatment. As far as I am concerned, that's at least manslaughter.

  • DrEvil007||

    You got it right the first time; the agents of the State and therefore the State is completely responsible for this man's death. If not for the actions and inactions of these agents that man would still be alive.

  • MJGreen - Docile Citizen||

    Holy shit. Nailed it!

  • Cloudbuster||

    Because debtor's prisons were a great idea back in the day.

  • Suicidy||

    Yes, they should not imprison him over that. I gave to pay for that shit. If this all happened where I live, I would end up paying more taxes. Especially after the multi million dollar judgement coming.

  • Xanas||

    What is even more depressing than the story is the that insane people like you can't see that imprisoning someone for a fine is immoral, besides not exactly being cost efficient even if it were so. We paid taxes to keep him there while guards watched him die paid by the same taxes.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Those guards were supposed to observe him. Nobody said anything about helping him.
    NEEDZ MOAR TRAINING

  • waffles||

    Asking the guards to observe a naked man. That's a hostile work environment.

  • sarcasmic||

    The real question is this: which corrections officer won the death pool?

  • kinnath||

    one less junkie

  • crazyfingers||

    Because someone doing drugs affects you how?

    Oh I see you get to determine how other people live their lives because you are a liberal fuckwit.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    methinks your sarcometer needs calibration. Where is our resident nuke to help?

  • crazyfingers||

    I doubt it. Kinnath is a neocon. Of course he supports the war on drugs as well. He'll probably be voting for Hillary.

  • jacob||

    Seriously, I haven't seen him comment on here for a while.

  • Cavadus||

    Uhhhh... why? They *are* synonymous.

  • ||

    What are the major policy differences between Clinton and McConnell?

  • kinnath||

    Apparently a new handle on an old troll.

    Or a new idiot unfamiliar with H&R.

  • Jimbo||

    Yes!

  • Karl Hungus||

    Because someone doing drugs affects you how?

    You're, uh, new around here, aren't you?

  • dchang0||

    Presumably, his drug habit was why he was fined for careless driving. (It is certainly possible he was 100% sober and drove carelessly at that time, but given the severity of his withdrawal symptoms, it is highly unlikely he was ever 100% sober.)

    So, his doing drugs endangered the lives of other drivers on the road, possibly including kinnath if kinnath lives nearby and drives on the same roads.

    Like most libertarians, I'm all for the freedom to do whatever drugs one wants, but as soon as a drug-impaired person begins to operate a motor vehicle, he is risking the lives of others with an object easily capable of lethal harm.

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    All crimes are punishable by death. All of them. I get called an idiot and a conspiracy theorist when I say that outside of Reason.

  • Almanian - Micro Trumper||

    Wilkommen to Amerika, comrade!

  • Just say Nikki||

    I usually just get blank stares.

  • commodious spittoon||

    "It's not that simple, you're being simplistic, it's a lot more nuanced than that, just follow simple steps and abide by the rules, they're there for your protection, it's only the most outrageous cases that get any attention, he made his decisions, yes, this was a bad situation, but it's hardly representative, a few bad apples, if he hadn't died there he would have overdosed in an alley somewhere, it's not like he didn't have chances, senseless deaths at the hands of the authorities is the price we pay for civilization..."

  • WTF||

    Of course cases like Eric Garner refute pretty much every attempted point there. Don't expect any proggies to actually admit it, though.

  • Eman||

    in my own experience, which is admittedly as a middle class white kid from new hampshire, so i dunno how representative that is, but police have NEVER done anything helpful for me. they do a mediocre job arresting people for being drunk less than three years after they could get drafted, but i think the only time i ever asked for their help was getting a guitar stolen in boston, and they pretty much straight away said they dont figure things like that out. my life would undoubtedly be better without police at all. i dont know if you can extrapolate from that to the whole world, but if voting meant anything, id vote for less police

  • ||

    My woman once called the police to chase off a guy who was idling a car with no muffler in front of our place for like an hour at 1am. I believe that is the full extent of the times the police have directly helped me.

  • WTF||

    They actually bothered to show up? Damn!

  • ||

    An hour later. Still, I was impressed.

  • Citizen X||

    There was the potential for revenue generation/seeing a woman in a nightie, so of course they showed up.

  • ||

    This was when we lived in Tremont, where the cops seemed to have orders to keep the white yuppies safe from the trash that surrounds the neighborhood. Other than everyone's car getting broken into all the time, they actually did a good job keeping the actual taxpayers reasonably unmurdered and unraped. Mostly.

  • Jimbo||

    Did they at least shoot your dog?

  • Suicidy||

    I have almost zero use for the police. Maybe a major crimes bureau to solve the big stuff makes sense, but those lazy, overpaid adrenalin junkie control freaks don't bother to do any real investigation on property crime issues. Which is most of what I need them for. Beyond that, they mostly just get in the way of dealing with things.

  • dchang0||

    There was one time when the cops helped me in that they arrested someone who had assaulted me while yelling racist epithets (I suppose that would be considered a hate crime nowadays). A few other times, they basically served as data collection--filing a police report after something had already gone down, like the burglary of my home.

    Every other time has been a negative experience (usually traffic tickets, but in one case, a cop LIED under oath in court to defend an incorrect/unjust ticket, causing me harm of just under $400). So, I'm net negative in my experiences with cops.

    That said, I recognize that law enforcement is something similar to a vaccine. With cops busting enough criminals out there, they make it less likely that I'll be the victim of a crime in the same way that with enough vaccinated people out there, due to herd immunity, they make it less likely that I'll get some communicable disease.

    I am grateful for that, mainly because some criminals are very, very violent, especially the Asian gangs one city over and the Latino gangs three cities south. If the cops can keep the gangs rotating in and out of jail, they've done a good job of protecting me from lethal harm.

  • Jim in Denver||

    He would have died, well thank you Nostradamus. He was taking methadone and other meds to get better... No one ever reforms, right?

    And to hell with your "a few bad apples" rationalization. If the (supposed majority) good apples' first priority isn't policing the "few" bad apples then they're not really so good either, are they?

  • ||

    "What do you think a government is?" always gets me looked at like I'm a monster.

  • sarcasmic||

    "Laws don't enforce themselves."

  • Just say Nikki||

    +1 Sally Kohn

  • ||

    I never get tired of this Meme-

    Wants More Government/More Government

  • sarcasmic||

    I looked her up since I'd never heard of her. Wow. What an idiot.

  • ||

    Isn't she the one who called Welch a racist because he said Obama was like Snoop Dogg in some way?

  • Zeb||

    People who have some faith in "good government" really have a hard time with that one. The Social Contract is a gun held to your head. You think government can solve all the problems, fine. Just let's be honest about what that really is.

  • WTF||

    Government is just the junkies we torture to death together.

  • WTF||

    Shit, should have scrolled down.

  • ||

    Can I sue for breach on contract due to duress?

  • grrizzly||

    Zeb, wasn't it you who asked for a nut punch the other day? Here you go.

  • Zeb||

    Yup. Still better than election crap.

  • Tony||

    This is not a demonstration of good government.

    I think the biggest roadblock to criminal justice reform won't be tough-on-crime politicians. I really don't think they have the wind at their backs these days.

    The biggest roadblock will be small-government politicians. The people your philosophy supplies with thoughts. Why? Because those are the ones who have turned legislating itself into an evil thing, and have caused gridlock due to ideological rigidity. Do you not think that fixing the system will require legislating and acting on the part of government officials? Exactly what use is bitching about the social contract here? What is your plan to fix things?

  • Zeb||

    You miss the point, as usual. Maybe that is what needs to happen for criminal justice reform. You can make that argument. But don't try telling me that government is anything but force and coercion.

  • Tony||

    In a technical, pointless-to-bitch-about sense, yes.

    Why not let's just leave it there and throw up our hands?

  • Citizen X||

    technical, pointless-to-bitch-about sense

    Sure seems to have proven applicable to David Stojcevski.

  • kbolino||

    Find me a legislative body whose agenda has included even a sizable number of proposals to repeal existing laws. Just one, somewhere in this country. The pernicious influence of Emmanuel Goldstein "small government ideological purity" should at least be quantifiable.

  • sarcasmic||

    As usual you've got it backwards. The problem here is too much legislation. Too many opportunities for the cops to use force on people. What you fail to understand is that every bit of law out there requires a very real threat of violence for non-compliance, else it is simply a suggestion. Laws regarding police conduct carry no threat of enforcement (who enforces the law on the enforcers?), so they are merely suggestions. That means that police reform is not going to happen.

    Sure ending immunity would help, as would abolishing police unions, but there's one simple fact that will never change: cops won't arrest cops. Period. Never have, never will.

    So the solution is to have less stuff for the cops to enforce. Every encounter with the police carries a possible death sentence for failure to obey, and that will not change. That's the nature of enforcing the law. So the only way to minimize these potentially deadly encounters is to have fewer laws (less legislation) for them to enforce.

  • ace_m82||

    When the dragon keeps killing the people (the people it's supposed to "protect"), you don't feed the dragon MORE, you either:

    A. Stop feeding the dragon, capture it, defang it, and keep it on a very strong chain, or

    B. Kill the dragon.

    Doing anything else is the very definition of insanity at this point...

  • Tony||

    So anarchic revolution it is. Clearly the most plausible and practical solution to this problem.

  • ||

    And there are Tony's beliefs in pretty much so many words: Doing anything other than maintaining the status quo is "anarchic revolution".

  • Suicidy||

    Tony, is this a good time to discuss my plan to euthanize all the progressives?

  • dchang0||

    Your assumption that government (or anyone) must provide a solution to "X" problem automatically rules out any possible agreement between us.

    The reality of the world is that there are many problems that simply don't have a solution. No solution that the people can provide for themselves or others, no solution that private businesses can provide, and no solution that governments can provide.

    You call that "anarchic revolution" to just accept the fact that some things can't be solved by throwing more government at them, but it really is just Reality(TM).

  • SimonJester||

    Plan to fix things? Let's start with "No torture," to stupid fucknut statist.

    How about "Don't imprison someone for over half a month for not paying a fucking traffic violation"?

    The best part of you bitching about this is somebody earlier said that Tulpa (who, while probably not you, might as well be you) would come to the rescue and defend this shit. See "MJGreen - Docile Citizen," above. Of course it isn't a "demonstration of good government," you brainless swine, not even the murders at the county jail would say that (in public.)

    And don't fucking talk about "gridlock" you rancid sack of mutilated scrotums, because nobody is better at gridlock as the left. Common sense reforms? Move beyond politics? Get the fuck out of the room, you lower the IQ of the whole street every time you open your mouth.

  • sarcasmic||

    Plan to fix things? Let's start with "No torture," to stupid fucknut statist.

    How about "Don't imprison someone for over half a month for not paying a fucking traffic violation"?

    How do you enforce that? Seriously. Who will enforce it, and how? Any prosecutor who enforces the law on the police will quickly lose the support of the police (or be targeted for retribution) and then be unable to do their job (or dead).

  • SimonJester||

    Right. I get that. You can't "enforce" it in the same way that you enforce other laws.

    But you can take away their power. They have been granted immense power and have very few conditions on their responsibility. Take away their power to put him in jail for a $700 fine. Take away their power to use solitary for an extended period. Take away their power to go against a medical professionals recommendation. Take away their power to use solitary confinement.

    I get it isn't a perfect solution (rough rides, after all, are illegal but still happen), but you can take power away from the police to stop shit like this from happening. It won't solve everything, but it will help.

  • John Galt||

    That's the size of it, Sarc. Sadly so.

  • Tony||

    So better laws and better government, as I indicated, not bong sessions about the nature of government. My immediate solution, stop voting for people who prefer the bong.

  • ||

    So the only realistic thing is tinkering around the edges using basically the same things that got us here. (I would also like to note that everybody thinks they're in favor of "better laws and better government" - people explicitly in favor of "govern us worse!" are a pretty small constituency - so that's not very useful as a standard.) Actually want to change things? Well, that's just crazy drug-addled hippie talk.

  • sarcasmic||

    So better laws and better government, as I indicated, not bong sessions about the nature of government.

    You have to understand what something is and how it works before you can improve upon it. So understanding the nature of government is a prerequisite for making it better.

    The nature of government is force. Government is nothing more than people who use violence and coercion to get their way. That's the foundation of everything that government does.

    Once you understand that (which you obviously don't), then it becomes pretty obvious that better government means smaller government. Unless you like people using violence and coercion against you (which you say you don't, yet you insist that more violence and coercion is the solution to too much violence and coercion).

  • Tony||

    Small government is and only is code for lower taxes on the very rich and powerful.

    Otherwise you're being extremely facile in the face of complex problems in a world where government is a reality and a necessary one. If you refuse to recognize simple reality then you might as well be part of the problem.

  • Jim in Denver||

    Imprisonment and $700+ fines are much more punitive for the poor than the wealthy you simple little man-thing.

  • gaoxiaen||

    Gridlock is not a bad thing. It would be better if those assholes stayed home and collected a paycheck for doing nothing.

  • Warren's Strapon||

    I get called an idiot and a conspiracy theorist when I say that outside of Reason.

    And some of these people were outraged by the death of Eric Garner. It's like they're not paying attention.

  • Just say Nikki||

    +another Sally Kohn

  • ||

    Like anybody needs another Sally Kohn.

  • waffles||

    It's all race-based. Check your privilege.

  • Tituspullo||

    It's not that all crimes are punishable by death, it's that any interaction with the state can result in your death.

  • tom covenant||

    YES

  • Almanian - Micro Trumper||

    #PureMichigan

    Makes me so proud to work in this shithole county. Fuck you, Macomb County jailers!

  • WTF||

    "Your trip begins at Michigan.thug"

  • Jerryskids||

    Spend some time in Macomb County and you won't just be talking about the good life...
    You'll be living it!

    Somebody really should change the 'Welcome To Macomb County' webpage. And from what I know of Dearborn and environs, it's odd they would throw a druggie in jail because just having to live in Macomb County is a pretty damn good excuse for using drugs.

  • Massey||

    What you know is exactly nothing, as Dearborn is in Wayne County.

  • Curtisls701||

    Has a lawyer ever made such an egregious statement? I know, I know...

  • ||

    Your Honor, my client, Adolph Hitler, is getting a bad rap. Compared to Mao or Stalin, my client is a lightweight. He only put a few people in internment camps. Many of their own volition. He could have fed them if it wasn't for those evil capitalist bombing our supply lines.

    /your average Esq.

  • This Machine||

    He was stripped naked—so that he couldn’t hurt himself—and forced to languish under the unceasing bright lights (the jail doesn’t turn them off, even at night).

    Holy shit. That is no-kidding Gulag-level maltreatment. I hope the family gets the justice they deserve, but these being the protected class of Law Enforcement, I won't hold my breath.

  • ||

    I hope his family rapes the living shit out of the taxpayers of Macomb County.

  • Free Society||

    Well that's dumb. Tax payers are by definition supporting their government involuntarily. When government officials do evil it's not justice that a) they are subject to mere civil damages and b) that those damages be paid by third parties who are extorted at gun point by the criminal organization in question.

  • Just say Nikki||

    Are the taxpayers of Macomb County calling for a dissolution of the police and local government? They may not all be responsible, but let's not pretend the vast majority of them aren't statists.

    You can't just declare everyone not responsible for the state. I'm sure there are a few activists in the area who should not be punished, but most taxpayers don't fall into that category.

  • Arthur45||

    What a jerk -did you se one single resident aware of or participating in this event?
    So shut up stupid - you prosecute those who commit crimes, not those who pay their saleries and have no control over them.

  • Jimbo||

    Well, Nikki is the worst, so there's that. Also: Are you stupid, Art?

  • Free Society||

    Are the taxpayers of Macomb County calling for a dissolution of the police and local government? They may not all be responsible, but let's not pretend the vast majority of them aren't statists.

    So the existence of the state makes it's involuntary subjects ethically liable for it's actions? The fact that a majority of people in an area support the state justifies the expropriation of everyone in that area?

    You can't just declare everyone not responsible for the state.

    You can't just declare everyone not responsible for the Gambino crime family because some local business like to pay them for protection.

    I'm sure there are a few activists in the area who should not be punished, but most taxpayers don't fall into that category.

    And is this settlement going to paid solely by supporters of statism? Can I opt out? If not then what the fuck are you blathering about?

  • Just say Nikki||

    So the existence of the state makes it's involuntary subjects ethically liable for it's actions? The fact that a majority of people in an area support the state justifies the expropriation of everyone in that area?

    No, it justifies expropriation from every single person who supports it. Which is going to be 99% of them.

    You can't just declare everyone not responsible for the Gambino crime family because some local business like to pay them for protection.

    Is that supposed to be an argument that people who pay them are not responsible? Because...they are.

    And is this settlement going to paid solely by supporters of statism? Can I opt out? If not then what the fuck are you blathering about?

    Did you miss the part where I explicitly said "[t]hey may not all be responsible" and " there are a few activists in the area who should not be punished"?

    Are you doing anything to smash the state other than commenting at H&R? Because...that's not that effective. Sorry you don't want to be complicit in this shit but you are.

  • Free Society||

    No, it justifies expropriation from every single person who supports it. Which is going to be 99% of them.

    I'm sure you took a poll. And even still what % support their local sheriffs department? In my neck of the woods its far far lower than 99%. And who gives a shit about that 1% who don't support it. Fuck them too right?

    Because...they are.

    Right, they're paying customers.

    Did you miss the part where I explicitly said "[t]hey may not all be responsible" and " there are a few activists in the area who should not be punished"?

    I missed the part where you said the proposed settlement would somehow not fuck those people.

    Are you doing anything to smash the state other than commenting at H&R? Because...that's not that effective. Sorry you don't want to be complicit in this shit but you are.

    Why would I have to justify anything in my life to a person like you? And no, I'm not complicit in shit. By the standard you set up everyone is so equally guilty of everything there's really no guilt at all. You cheapen the concept of guilt and you even go so far as to collectivize ethics where it's completely unwarranted.

    I pay my taxes so that I don't get murdered or kidnapped. Simple as that.

    What have you done to smash the state? It's still there, I blame you. Maybe you should go out and stab some tax payers, they're responsible for it or something.

  • ||

    No. it isn't dumb.y. People choose to live in Macomb County. And I say, if you want to live in a fuckwad county that tortures people for a living, you should have to pay for it. Someone needs to hold these cocksuckers accountable. It isn't spineless judges. The fucking pigs aren't going to hold themselves accountable. You don't want to pay the costs associated with a soviet gulag police state, move somewhere else or get your fucking pigs on a leash.

  • Just say Nikki||

    Yep.

  • sarcasmic||

    Who puts a leash on the pigs? Seriously.

  • ||

  • Citizen X||

    This guy i knew in college who had a pet pig?

  • Jimbo||

    Do pigs in a blanket count?

  • ||

    B&D Furries?

  • ||

    Nothing is going to change, no procedures, no laws, no amelioration of any quantum of immunity these pigs, prosecutors, and fucking spineless judges posses because this case is morally outrageous. Nothing. The only way you change things is to spin in terms of a gay/lgbt/cisnormativewhateverthefuck. This fucked up country can't even gin up a decent modicum of outrage because baby children are chopped into pieces and sold. Any seriously believe in this fucked up, atomistic, morally rudderless nation that the tortureous death of a junkies is going to change things. No. The only way to change things is make people notice where the only place it matters, their pocket book. Fuck Macomb County and its residents. If the resident don't fire everyone responsible for this revenue sweep, they deserve to get fucked.

  • Marshall Gill||

    Fair enough. Put "Troy" down as responsible for whatever the government does in his neck of the woods and make sure and bill him for it.

  • Free Society||

    Well you live in the US right Troy? Why did you kill all those Iraqis? Why did you bomb that school in Peshwar with a drone strike? If you don't fire the president you deserve to get fucked.

  • Massey||

    Haha, you had me going till the chopping up baby children part. Because that's insane nonsense.

  • R C Dean||

    Knocked it out of the park, Troy.

  • Free Society||

    Where do you live Dean, I want to tally up all the state crimes you're responsible for.

  • Free Society||

    People choose to live in Macomb County.

    "If you don't like then you can get out!" Everyone chooses to live somewhere and there is not one single scrap of land on the planet not effectively claimed by some government somewhere. By this standard, anyone who doesn't like statism has some obligation to live on the far side of the moon.

    And I say, if you want to live in a fuckwad county that tortures people for a living, you should have to pay for it.

    Right, so people with business, property and family kinship should pack up and leave because their county has an asshole jailer who was given protection and immunity by the laws of higher levels of government.

    Someone needs to hold these cocksuckers accountable.

    YOU'RE NOT HOLDING THEM ACCOUNTABLE. That's my entire point, you're laying punitive damages on tax payers.

    You don't want to pay the costs associated with a soviet gulag police state, move somewhere else or get your fucking pigs on a leash.

    I'll remember that next time you bitch about anything the federal government does. I'll be sure to tell you to move out, and if you don't move out, I'll remind you that you are the supporter of a soviet gulag state.

    Though if you do move out, I'll be sure to remind you that means you support all of the policies and actions of the next government you live under. That's how it works apparently.

  • Stretchy||

    Supposedly, the government is going to start charging individual corporate officers for crimes instead of allowing a corporation to get off the hook by merely paying a fine. Perhaps we should apply the same to government? We will no longer allow a city/county/state to get off the hook by merely forking over some taxpayer money. The individuals involved will be investigated and prosecuted as individuals.

  • Free Society||

    That'd be fantastic.

  • ||

    Many people suggest taking the $ out of the police pension fund. That's my favorite solution so far.

  • RAHeinlein||

    I'm for defunding Macomb's Drunk Driving Forfeiture Program.

    http://prosecutorsmith.com/mac.....e-program/

  • gaoxiaen||

    A long time in jail, naked, with the lights on, would be appropriate.

  • Karl Hungus||

    I hope his family rapes the living shit out of the taxpayers of Macomb County.

    The family deserves compensation, sure. But paying them with money from the general coffers will solve nothing. If the settlement were to come from the PD's budget or from the cops'/corrections officers' union coffers, that would be better. Best bet is to criminally prosecute the people responsible for this man's death, and follow that with civil suits against those individuals. When individual officers/corrections officers start going to prison, and when these settlements start being paid out of the personal assets of the people who commit these crimes, that's when shit like this will cease.

  • ||

    But paying them with money from the general coffers will solve nothing.

    If the costs rise enough, it will solve something. Maybe the county's insurance carrier will tell the county it needs to back off. But if you learn that living in Macomb County costs you and extra $10,000.00 a year to pay for cops torturing people, maybe you won't live there.

    Best bet is to criminally prosecute the people responsible for this man's death, and follow that with civil suits against those individuals. When individual officers/corrections officers start going to prison, and when these settlements start being paid out of the personal assets of the people who commit these crimes,

    agreed. But this isn't going to happen because of the defacto complete immunity the King's men possess. Judges are too fucking spinelss to get rid of this judge made rule. And dcongressmen don't have the balls to stand up to the police or their unions. Maybe immunity will become an issue, but only after it costs people something.

  • kV||

    City of Chicago paid out ~$350 million in settlements related to police misconduct between 2008 and 2014. That crazy amount doesn't seem to have changed anything.

  • Free Society||

    If the costs rise enough, it will solve something.

    Right because it's worked soooo well in every jurisdiction in this country that's had to make pay outs. Actually what it does give the appearance of justice so the problem persists. Proposing this like some kind of solution is just window dressing. You believing this even resembles justice makes the problem persist.

  • Just say Nikki||

    Remember, everyone: torturing drug users to death is something we all do together!

  • ||

    Torturing junkies to death is the price we pay for freedom.

  • Hugh Akston||

    Torturing junkies to death is the line that separates civilization from chaos.

  • Citizen X||

    Can't make an omelet without torturing a few junkies to death.

  • Citizen X||

    If you like your untortured junkies, you can keep your untortured junkies.

  • Jordan||

    It takes a village.

  • MJGreen - Docile Citizen||

    Enough of that hogwash, you stupid anarchist.

  • Citizen X||

    Whoa. I just realized that "hogwash" is the perfect term for cop apologetics.

  • Doctor Whom||

    I used to believe in not torturing junkies to death, but then I grew up and realized that the real world doesn't work that way.

  • Free Society||

    Remember, everyone: torturing drug users to death is something we all do together!

    That's pretty ironic given your arguments on this thread that taxpayers are ethically liable for actions of government agents. How many drug users have you tortured to death Nikki?

  • Zeb||

    Benzodiazapine withdrawal is some serious shit and almost certainly a major factor in his death. Unlike opioids, the withdrawals can actually kill. And those were presumably prescribed to him. So pretty fucking negligent, ignorant and cruel.

  • Just say Nikki||

    Yeah, it doesn't mention in this article if he was having seizures, and I can't watch the video report at the moment, but you CANNOT go off benzos cold turkey if you're actually taking them regularly.

  • Zeb||

    I can't watch the video either, but the article mentions convulsions, so I'm thinking that seizures are likely.

  • MJGreen - Docile Citizen||

    I can't watch the video, because it would make this day even more depressing.

    It's Thursday! Almost Friday!

  • Granny Weatherwax||

    I watched it. Oh hell ya, there are seizures.

  • sarcasmic||

    How is it negligent? The officers knew what they were doing. I'll bet they had a pool going for when he was going to die.

  • Zeb||

    OK, then criminally cruel. I'm just pretending that laws mean shit.

  • RBS||

    Intentional is the word you are looking for.

  • Zeb||

    I don't claim to understand anyone's intentions.

  • Citizen X||

    You're no John.

  • R C Dean||

    I'd go with "malicious" or "depraved.", myself.

  • SimonJester||

    Right, and it is worth mentioning that he was not suffering from withdrawal from an illegal drug. If I read the article right, he is suffering withdrawal from a perscribed medication.

    How is this different from a diabetic not being allowed insulin? I am ignorant in the Dao of Drugs, but can someone more experienced help me understand?

  • Just say Nikki||

    Benzos feel good even if you have a prescription, so they're eviller than insulin.

  • SugarFree||

    I have no doubt that if insulin got you even a little bit high it would be outlawed.

  • Just say Nikki||

    No question, dude.

  • Jimbo||

    Got any shugar, man? I'll pay top dollar. (shugar or whatever insulin's street name would be)

  • Cliché Bandit||

    The lawyer is partly right, the civil suit doesn't have as much merit as the murder charges that should be filed against pretty much everyone.

  • ||

    Macomb County has no plans to settle, according to the lawyer

    1. Because any settlement would still be so UUUGE as to bankrupt the county anyway, and

    2. Because we are the government, FYTY.

  • Lee G||

    Not the only death they've had recently

    http://www.dailytribune.com/ge.....ounty-jail

  • Just say Nikki||

    Dietz reports that a nurse evaluated him and recommended he be placed in a medical drug detox unit. Instead, he was put in a jail cell. Six days later, he was acting erratic and moved to a mental health cell and put under suicide watch where his activities were under video surveillance

    Near the end, before he died, he was visibly thinner and no longer had the strength to call for help, Dietz reports. In his final two days of life, Dietz reports, Stojcevski never got off the cold cement floor in his cell and was gasping for his final breaths.
  • Juvenile Bluster||

    Christ.

    Maybe I'd be more content with this stuff if I was a religious person. At least I'd then know that these people would get theirs in the afterlife, because there's clearly going to be no punishment for them on Earth,

  • Just say Nikki||

    There just aren't really words for people who would watch someone too weak to get up off the floor or speak for two days and not call for medical help.

  • sarcasmic||

    I got some words: need-to-die scum.

  • Citizen X||

    I got some more words, but Reason doesn't need another subpoena.

  • sarcasmic||

    Saying that someone needs to die isn't a threat. It's not like I invited [redacted] to [redacted] them through a [redacted].

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    [redacted body part] first?

  • SimonJester||

    With a [redacted adjective] [redacted noun] inserved [redacted adverb] into their [redacted sphincter]?

    It is like madlibs!

  • ||

    there's clearly going to be no punishment for them on Earth,

    Exactly. 4 years from now, everyone responsible will still be employed, thought maybe not by Macomb County, and no one will be in jail or prison.

  • Chip the Chipper||

    As a religious person this stuff probably makes me more sad than you to be honest.

    The world wasn't supposed to be like this in the first place.

  • Florida Man||

    If he was on suicide watch, where was the supervising physician? If there was one, xe should lose xis license. If there wasn't one, denying medical care is a civil rights violation.

  • KER||

    This must be one of those private prisons Bernie Sanders has been warning us about.

  • Crusty Juggler||

    This would have never happened in a prison that is run by the government and staffed by unions.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Guy doesn't take responsibility for traffic tickets ends up dead. Sheriff who refuses to take responsibility for that man's death will likely be re-elected.

  • Colonel Slanders||

    ^^^This. The sheriffs department in Macomb County (they run the jail) was controlled by the Hackel family for 34 years. Mark Hackel, (now the county executive!) succeeded his Father William Hackel who was forced from office and jailed on a rape charge in 2000. I don't know much about the guy who runs it now. He's an old timer and came up through the ranks when the Hackel's ran things so I'm sure he's cut from the same cloth as his priors. This is not really a surprise to me. (I've lived there for 42 years)

  • Free Society||

    (I've lived there for 42 years)

    Troy and Nikki think you should get fucked good and hard for this.

  • Jimbo||

    Has it not occurred to you the Colonel may be into that?

  • Eman||

    " Either their vigilance was inadequate, or they watched and simply didn’t care." false dichotomy

  • Another Phil||

    false dichotomy

    Sure, if you're being pedantic, I suppose they could have cared, but just let him die for some other reason. That seems unlikely though. What did you have in mind, genius?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Those guards were following orders.
    They bear no personal responsibility whatsoever.
    hth

  • Citizen X||

    Imperial stormtroopers?

  • SimonJester||

    Your mom?

  • bvandyke||

    ^this, almost lost my red bull through the nose.

  • Swiss Servator||

    Caesar's legions?

  • Rhywun||

    smooches!

  • Michael Ejercito||

    Sovereign immunity precludes a suit.

  • Swiss Servator||

    Not a section 1983 one.

  • MJGreen - Docile Citizen||

    He was stripped naked—so that he couldn’t hurt himself—and forced to languish under the unceasing bright lights (the jail doesn’t turn them off, even at night).

    Well that's sure to calm down the mentally unstable.

    Or maybe it is very cunning of the prison: if they misdiagnose you as unstable, the conditions will make you unstable, making it clear that you are right where you belong.

  • Citizen X||

    And if you're not destabilized by those conditions, it just proves you were already unstable to begin with. Genius!

  • Just say Nikki||

    Yeah. This doesn't get talked about very much here at H&R, but the way we treat unstable prisoners is itself almost always torture.

  • Tundra, well-chilled.||

    Don't they just usually drug the hell out of them?

  • Just say Nikki||

    They usually strip them naked and leave them alone in a cell with people watching them. Just like this guy.

    I don't know about the drugs, but I've never taken enough drugs to make "naked in a brightly lit jail cell with people watching me" sound okay.

  • Tundra, well-chilled.||

    I meant sedate them. I had a friend who was "involuntarily committed" or whatever the fuck they call it. He was just on heavy medication the whole time, I assumed so they didn't have to deal with him.

  • Just say Nikki||

    I'm not talking people who are imprisoned only for being a "danger" to self and others, but people who are arrested for crimes and are declared at risk of suicide.

  • allie||

    Maybe I'm horrible and lack perspective, but I'm sort of glad Sandra Bland killed herself before the cops caught on so that she was at least spared this indignity.

  • Eman||

    i have. there have probably been times when that would have sounded like alot of fun

  • ||

    The way stable prisoners are treated is often torture. How many prisoners are in solitary confinement in this country right now?

  • Tundra, well-chilled.||

  • MJGreen - Docile Citizen||

    And how many of those have actually been tried and convicted of a crime?

  • ||

    Probably a majority, I'd guess. Now, how many of them have been convicted by a jury, not had a bullshit plea bargain blackmailed out of them? Certainly nowhere near a majority.

  • Lord at War||

    What is wth this pussy bullshit about "solitary confinement"?

    Of the 227 days I served for a B&E when I was 15, I spent 96 consecutive days in "solitary".

    Solitary- 10 min to shower before wake-up for others, 5 minutes to piss on the shift-change.

    The only book in your room is the bible. If you are caught exercising, you get "straight-jacketed'" to your bunk (3 days first offense, 5 days each after that). I was tied down for 13 days.

    Guess what I did to deserve this penalty?

    A) "Shanked" a dude in the bathroom with a sharpened toothbrush.

    B) Got busted with 20 Quaaludes when I fell down at dinner.

    C) Said the word "nigger", and refused to apologize.

    D) Ate my "SpeedStick" deodorant, and successfully escaped for over a month on the trip to a hospital.

    Hint: The other three all actually happened- the perps spent a total of 7 days combined in solitary.

  • Don'tTreadOnMeChipper||

    Dead is very stable. See, they were just trying to help him!

  • R C Dean||

    Still opposed to the death penalty, everyone? Even for the staff of this jail?

    If nothing else, this provides yet another example of how every single law, regulation, ordinance, you name it, is a running start down the road of having armed agents of the state haul you away. Every. Single. One.

    This guy died a horrible death because of a fucking traffic ticket.

  • Tundra, well-chilled.||

    Yeah, I'm still opposed.

    But this immunity bullshit has to end. When you cede violence to one group and strip any liability for their actions, how the fuck could you expect anything else?

  • ||

    After reading this story I'm not even entirely opposed to lynch mobs.

  • waffles||

    He died a horrible death because of failure to obey. It doesn't matter to what degree he didn't obey. He didn't OBEY.

  • ||

    I still disagree with the death penalty. But yeah, in the fucking Land of the Free®, a man was tortured a man to death because he was unable to pay the price for a revenue sweep by the King's men. Add Macomb County to the list of sovereigns I no longer recognize as legitimate.

  • Rt. Hon. Judge Woodrow Chipper||

    My stance has always been that the death penalty should ONLY apply to government employees.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    I am opposed to the death penalty except in cases of abuse of power or corruption by government employees.
    It's one thing the Chinese get right.

  • PlaystoomuchHALO||

    My operating theory is that the guards were taking bets on how long it would take for him to die.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    This is a kind of tragedy of the commons. No one person is responsible for this (apparently) and they likely know it, so there is no incentive to do anything beyond feeding to keep the inmate alive.

    To change metaphors, in the mind of the average criminal justice professional, they work on an assembly line. The criminals aren't people, they're widgets passing by on the conveyor belt. Each worker does his thing and then the widget moves to the next mindless worker. In this case, the next worker was the coroner and then on to the courts for final disposal.

  • Hugh Akston||

    That's the banality of evil.

  • ||

    The video said that there was someone responsible for notating every 15 minutes the condition of the inmate.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    If they're not held accountable, they're not really responsible.

  • Hugh Akston||

    I'm certain that the records will show an entry made every 15 minutes as required.

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    All entries made shortly after his death, I'm sure. But they were just catching up on reporting what surely had already happened.

  • R C Dean||

    The video said that there was someone responsible for notating every 15 minutes the condition of the inmate.

    9:15 - Inmate is writhing on floor, screaming.

    9:30 - No change in inmate's condition.

    9:45 - Inmate is hallucinating and has taken off all his clothes.

    10:00 - Inmate's clothes confiscated, inmate huddled in corner sobbing.

    10:15 - Inmate napping on concrete floor


    Next day

    4:00 - Inmate still napping, hasn't moved in over 16 hours.

    Next day

    8:00 - Inmate still napping, hasn't moved in over 40 hours.

  • R C Dean||

    In a functional country, Macomb County would be crawling with FBI agents and papered with DOJ subpoenas right now.

    In this country? Meh. Dead junky, who cares.

  • Florida Man||

    He's a white guy so his civil rights couldn't be violated thus no media outrage.

  • WTF||

    #BlackLivesMatter, RC!

  • ||

    Subpoenas are only for those who think the spineless cocksuckers known as federal district judges deserve to be put in woodchippers. Feet first Preeta, feet first.

  • Mike M.||

    "White guy? Not newsworthy. Next!"

    -The lowlife scum in the JournoList

  • Yeparoo||

    The victim is not black. This is not a news event. #WhiteLivesDontMatter

  • Massey||

    Pretty amazing four "different" people posted this stupid take one right after the other.

  • bassjoe||

    He was a drug addict. Ergo, he deserved to die.

    Anyways, this was the case of a few well-meaning people who love their families (who will be suspended with pay pending a pro forma administrative review which will affirm their actions as satisfactory given the very tough circumstances) and in line with department policy (which will also be reviewed and affirmed). The drug addict's family is only looking for a pay day if they say anything different.

    /statist derp

  • Nonstopdrivel||

    I was a medic in one of those secret prisons you hear about on the news. I saw this kind of shit all the time. Men locked naked in solitary confinement cells, their pallets confiscated, forced to huddle on the floor, piss and shit in one bucket, drink from another. I watched solitary confinement shatter sane men in a matter of days, watched it reduce them to tears as they begged just to be allowed to hold the snapshots of their wives and children that were sadistically stored in pouches hanging from the outside of their cell doors. I watched men who didn't know they were scheduled for release in a matter of reduced lose all hope and resort to slashing their wrists with their zippers or hanging themselves with the elastic in their jumpsuits. I watched husks of humanity hunkered in the corner, zombified by repeated injections of Haldol and Prolix, staring out vacantly at a world they no longer recognized and no longer recognized them.

    I used to be ambivalent on the issue of solitary confinement. I came back from that hellhole convinced solitary confinement is a particularly vicious form of torture, one that should be outlawed everywhere.

  • Nonstopdrivel||

    Prolixin, not Prolix. Damn autocorrect.

  • waffles||

    This post makes me want to vomit. Evil is real.

  • Mike M.||

    Extended solitary confinement is absolutely 100% torture. It's a hundred times worse than waterboarding. And I agree it should be banned everywhere.

  • Paul.||

    Unfortunately, this entire episode is essentially a call for more government.

    I don't mean that facetiously, just a neutral observation.

    Having a little bit of experience with this field, what this requires is that jail officials have people on staff who can properly evaluate prisoners for mental health, drug addiction etc., then make sure that prisoner gets the proper conditions for incarceration.

    This requires new departments, new agencies, and new employees to facilitate this kind of stuff.

  • Citizen X||

    No, it just requires current jail employees to have the tiny bit of sense and human decency to recognize that if a dude is having convulsions or hasn't moved in two days he probably needs medical attention.

  • Paul.||

    Again, having some experience with this stuff, the average cop/jail guard DOESN'T know the difference between mentally ill, drug addiction, or being a huge asshole.

    Of course, I don't disagree with the larger premise, that if a guy is rapidly losing weight, not eating and acting irrationally- it seems that at that point the cop/jail guard should be calling the professionals to in.

  • SimonJester||

    This would be the case if not for the evidence, above, that the individual DID get the proper recommendations, but they were not carried out.

  • SC916||

    Bull. It requires 1 part time employee or independent contractor to come in write training and procedures for the guard and to come in periodically to train them. It goes with the territory that if you take custody of someone you become responsible for caring for all of their needs, so if they aren't up to it perhaps they can unincorporate their little po-dunk jail and let the county (or state) handle it.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Shots were fired

    Delaware police officers fatally shot an armed man in a wheelchair after responding to a call that he had a self-inflicted gunshot wound, authorities say.

    When Wilmington officers arrived on the scene on Wednesday afternoon, the man was armed with a handgun. Shots were fired and the man died at the scene. Sgt. Andrea Janvier told The News Journal that circumstances of the shooting are under investigation.

    -----

    According to Delaware paper, a woman named Alexis Anthony identified the man as her cousin, Jeremy "Bam" McDowell. She said he was shot by officers five times. They told her he was attempting to commit suicide and refused to drop his weapon, she continued.


    Heroes.
    In
    blue.

  • waffles||

    He was attempting (but failing at) suicide. Looks like the cops helped.

  • R C Dean||

    Isn't assisting suicide a crime?

  • RayJ||

    Not if you wear a blue uniform, then it's celebrated.

  • Inigo "Chip" DuBois||

    What makes this even worse, if such is possible, and a point many are missing is this man was in recovery before he was jailed for the unpaid fine.

    He would have been PRESCRIBED the methadone, Xanax and klonipin as a treatment regimen, and the utter failure of the prison authorities to continue him on those legally prescribed drugs led to his death. It's no different than if they had denied someone their heart pills or insulin.

    The irony is that if he had stayed a junkie (was still taking heroin) at the time of his unwarranted incarceration, he would have had unpleasant -- but entirely non-lethal -- withdrawals.

  • Nonstopdrivel||

    I was a medic in one of those secret prisons you hear about on the news. I saw this kind of shit all the time. Men locked naked in solitary confinement cells, their pallets confiscated, forced to huddle on the floor, piss and shit in one bucket, drink from another.

    I watched solitary confinement shatter sane men in a matter of days, watched it reduce them to tears as they begged just to be allowed to hold the snapshots of their wives and children that were sadistically stored in pouches hanging from the outside of their cell doors. I watched men who didn't know they were scheduled for release in a matter of days lose all hope and resort to slashing their wrists with their zippers or hanging themselves with the elastic in their jumpsuits. I watched husks of humanity hunkered in the corner, zombified by repeated injections of Haldol and Prolixin, staring out vacantly at a world they no longer recognized and no longer recognized them.

    I used to be ambivalent on the issue of solitary confinement. I came back from that hellhole convinced that in fact it's a particularly vicious form of torture, one that should be outlawed everywhere.

  • Ayn Random Variation||

    30 days in the hole

  • prolefeed||

    exhibit number 100,000 or so that every law that is enforced (i.e. every law that is an actual law), no matter how seemingly minor, potentially carries the death sentence

  • Paul.||

    And it will be ever thus, hence our right to keep and bear arms.

  • RockLibertyWarrior||

    Fucking scum sucking pigs, these fucking pig bastards wonder why their getting shot at and people don't respect them? They need to take a look in the mirror and the cop suckers need re evaluate what their sucking and how much jizz needs to be pumped out of their stomachs.

  • SimonJester||

    Did Cyborg get a new handle?

  • Tundra, well-chilled.||

    This is pretty fucked up.

    Former Rikers Island mental health worker details experience of inmates going mad, abuse in new book

    Solitary was intended only for the most violent criminals who posed an imminent threat. In fact, as overcrowding increasingly became an issue, guards would ticket a hapless inmate for isolation purely to open up a bed in the general cells.

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    Interesting study on how one loses their own humanity (thanks to either the inmates or the fellow guards, take your pick. Sounds like both, but more the latter thanks to conditioning)

    One day she found herself trying to convince a new staffer to return to the Bing even though he was unnerved by a recent suicide attempt. She pointed out the inmate survived.

    "The guy broke his neck!" the staffer protested.

    "Yes, but it was just a little bone, not an important bone," she argued.

    It wasn't until she heard her colleague's clipboard clatter to the floor, dropped in shock, that Buser heard herself. She retreated to her office and sobbed.

    Buser left Rikers not long afterward and restored herself by founding the Samaritans of New York suicide prevention hotline. She also advocates against the inhumane treatment of those behind bars.
  • This Machine Chips Fascists||

    Whatever you do, do not go read the comments on Reason's derpbook post of this story. Holy fucking shit! We are doomed.

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    Reason Facebook is weird. It's as if most of the people who reply are Tulpa sockpuppets. I have no clue how most of them ever "liked" Reason.

  • lap83||

    Isn't everyone on Facebook a Tulpa sockpuppet?

  • SimonJester||

    I can't derpbook at work. Care to share some examples?

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    Alright, fine.

    Jon Noltie He died entirely from his own actions (drug use). If you are arguing that the county should have given him special care to deal with his drug use, then you are making an argument for drug prohibition. You can't both claim that drug use should be legal and that the government/taxpayers should have to take special care of drug users.
    Bevan Everett Libertarian justice. The cops aren't responsible for what you do to yourself. He did the drugs, he suffered the Libertarian consequences. Heartless, but reality. Only a welfare state protects you from your bad decisions.
    Bevan Everett I am far more Libertarian than Trump but I also understand this site is littered with LIbertarians who can't stomach their own convictions to let people live with their decisions and their consequences. Only liberals think you need bailed out of every bad choice you make. Our Pioneer ancestors would be better representatives for Libertarians than the Libertarians who just want one side the equation liberalized. All drugs, sex, and as little government as possible until stuff goes awry. Then they go crying to mommy government for help. If you cut the cord prepare for the hard landing.
    Tony Smith Anything you post like this anymore I hesitate to trust...Reason has been wrong quite a bit lately. You're too quick to condemn. #ReasonStandsWithAhmedtheTerrorist
  • ace_m82||

    *vomits*

    I'm guessing that none of these geniuses ever got taught critical thinking in their lives, right?

  • This Machine Chips Fascists||

    I warned ya!

  • R C Dean||

    These morally and ethically vacant assholes actually, explicitly support long jail terms and even death as "deserved" for not paying a parking ticket.

    He wasn't locked up because he was an addict. And I have no idea why its "libertarian" justice to lock up a drug addict in the first place, much less deny them treatment once you have them caged.

  • Juvenile Bluster||

    Duncan Lundy Another case where the punishment fits the crime: justice served.
    Bevan Everett One more martir, or should I say an idiot who thought becoming addicted to drugs was some sort of benefit. The idiot did it to himself. Isn't that what Libertarians believe.

    (that Bevan guy has a ton of comments. I'm about 80% sure that he's actually Tulpa.)

    Daniel McCormack Drug withdrawal? We should be sympathetic? Don't think so.
    Spencer Brown Talk about click bait.. He died of withdrawals... Not officer torture

    Can't do anymore, too mentally exhausted from picking through the comments to find the "best".

  • ace_m82||

    They must just assume that getting thrown in prison is "normal" and one should always be prepared for the contingency, right? That's the only way this makes sense!

  • R C Dean||

    I guess Spencer thinks that someone with, say, sepsis who is locked up, gets no treatment, and dies "He died of sepsis, not officer torture."

    Or a diabetic is locked up: "He died of not getting his insulin, not officer torture."

    I like the way they completely miss that he was in treatment, and that the cops effectively discontinued his treatment, and he died because of that.

  • ace_m82||

    Or any animal is locked up: "He died of not getting food, not officer torture."

  • This Machine Chips Fascists||

    "That K9 officer died of inefficient heat exchange, not being left unattended in a hot patrol car. Move along!"

  • This Machine Chips Fascists||

    Not to mention the fact that he was evaluated by medical staff and was recommended to be sent to the detox unit. I guess it just wasn't in the budget?

  • R C Dean||

    Or

    "The officer died of not wearing his bulletproof vest, not being shot by a bank robber."

  • Hank Phillips||

    Perfectly justified. (signed) the DA.

  • ace_m82||

    Reason(ers? oids? ish people?)

    There is a man who was killed and who harmed no-one. This is a violation of NAP (obviously).

    What is justice, true, real justice, in this case?

    Answer below.

  • Hank Phillips||

    I favor leaving folks alone, and addictive drugs are dreary--cannot compete with nonaddictive recreational drugs.

  • Chip the Chipper||

    He's white? Nonstory

  • Hank Phillips||

    Airbrushed?

  • AD-RtR/OS!||

    Perhaps he shouldn't have allowed himself to become addicted to drugs; or, recognizing that addiction, he should have checked himself into re-hab instead of being a scofflaw?
    Addiction is just one of the steps onto the podium to accept that Darwin Award.

  • Don'tTreadOnMeChipper||

    You are an idiot. Please go away. No, actually re-read the article and the comments and then go away.

  • JBSparks||

    Unacceptable

  • Hank Phillips||

    This sort of thing happens to opiate addicts, which is why opiates are properly described as addictive. Nothing of the sort ever happens with pot, coke, acid, crack, speed, mushroom, ecstasy, MMDA or mescalin users. Barbiturates, created to mimic narcotics, also cause duress-inducing addiction.

  • Hank Phillips||

    Decriminalizing the stuff would shut off a major source of police and government corruption, and free up money for drugs to reverse the process less painfully (instead of getting cops and lawyers into tit bars and Swiss bank accounts).

  • Hank Phillips||

    Canada used to be a heroin smuggling conduit, and Canadian police have a lot of experience handling addicts without killing anyone. We could learn some practical stuff from the Canooks.

  • John Galt||

    Fortunately for Macomb County Stojcevski is a safe to torture murder name.

  • jrom||

    The cops, prosecutors, and judges must have had a good laugh about this guy dying in jail. They probably wish everyone died in jail and prison on a bullshit charge!

  • Hank Phillips||

    The really bad part is that US-backed dictatorships dominated by insane Jesus freaks really will applaud the murder of this guy who, after all, invited Demonic Possession. Juntas and death squads look to the USA as an example-setting role model. Positive Christianity will parlay that into another couple of hundred torture-murders, maybe even of foreigners, like in Malaysia.

  • bassasaurusrex||

    FINALLY we get to starve someone to death for $700 traffic tickets. Woo hoo gubment!

    Seriously though, the city lawyer is a complete knob. I understand he can't say 'wow we're boned' but his response was exceptionally callous given the fact that they have all the legal merit in the world. That man would have been better off in Abu Ghraib.Truly disgusting.

  • Philip||

    Withdrawal can be fatal but extremely unlikely to be death by withdrawal after two weeks.

    Leaving the light on at "all hours of the day" is torture? I doubt it.

    Not having any medical supervision. He did have some and I guess he could have refused to eat but the medical staff control the care he received, not the prison.

    Maybe he also had mental issues besides withdrawal symptoms.

  • MJGreen - Docile Citizen||

    Leaving the light on at "all hours of the day" is torture? I doubt it.

    Try it.

  • Philip||

    I doubt it but not because I haven't tried it.

  • gphx||

    This guy was denied medical treatment similar to how the guy who died in the back of a van was. But only black lives matter. It'd be great if people put away the color crap and stood together.

  • ThomasD||

    He'd likely have survived the methadone withdrawal if opiates were his only problem. It was the benzodiazepine withdrawal that killed him.

    But calling those drugs "treatment" is rather inaccurate. His body was dependent upon them, so really all they were - at best - was maintenance of his addiction. Maintenance does not make you any better, so really should not be called treatment.

  • SC916||

    Well, they treat the chemical imbalance, which does break the cycle of self-harmful addictive behavior, and in the process turns an addiction into a dependence, which is a huge improvement for both the addict slams for society as a whole (and is why it's legitimately considered a treatment.)

  • ThomasD||

    Please tell me which specific chemicals are not in "balance," and exactly what the "balance" should be?

    Then tell me how opiates and/or benzodiazepines change this "balance" you speak of?

  • TMLutas||

    When someone goes to prison, it's normal that they get their legitimately prescribed medications so their incarceration does not turn into a death sentence. This obviously didn't happen here. Who was responsible for that decision?

  • Philip||

    My guess is that it is the medical staff, based on a few online searches.

  • Undercover Libertarian||

    How dare you criticize the cops and the county, I mean he committed a minor offense and owed the government money, he was a danger and a menace to society and what the police did, or lack thereof, was necessary to protect the public. Of course they had to deny him his meds, they were drugs in prison, and of course they let him die, he was was jail so he must have deserved it somehow. Right?

    No but seriously, This is why we need oversight on Law Enforcement and Prisons, as well as more sane laws regarding how to deal with a $772 fine and other minor stuff

  • Coulee13||

    This happens way to often. A few years ago at the Orange County Florida Jail, a young lady, Karen Johnson, died from methadone withdrawal after 4 days. She was locked up by mistake and said please don't let me die in here. She knew someone else this happened to. Other inmates begged the guards to help her to no avail. They were told to mind their own business while she died on the floor of her cell. They wouldn't provide water or a blanket. Her family won a lawsuit for 10 million but they would much rather have their daughter back. Orange County did institute a methadone program for inmates to detox. Personally, this scares me to death due to the fact that I've had 7 back surgeries and have to take medication daily and have been for over 15 years. One mistake and I could be next. I never engage in any activity that might cause me to be arrested, but like others, mistakes can and are made. Please don't write off anyone by saying that wouldn't happen if they weren't a junkie. Things aren't always as they seem.

  • SC916||

    Yeah, same with those diabetics and people on chemo therapy too... If they can't survive on just food and water they can just f-ck off and die... They shoulda thought of that before they ate so many carbs or spent so much time in the sun...

    Oh, wait, no that's batsh-t insane inhuman f-ck-tard a--hole reasoning there... How about we give people competent medical care when they're incarcerated instead as they are constitutionally entitled (since it's not like they can go out and get it on their own now can they.)

  • ||

    I'm late but don't care.

    To the residents of Roseville, MICHIGAN how are you going to make your police force account for this barbaric and galling shock of inhumanity?

    Remember, if the police are callous enough to this to a HUMAN being, they can do it to YOU. This should not be tolerated. But hey. Procedures were followed, amirite? Or, maybe the 'heroes' feared for their lives or something, right?

    They lack not only professionalism and class, but basic humanity.

    Screw them and their excuses as well as this piece of shit lawyer. They offer little if this is how they act.

    Call it a spade if you will.

    They're are all social derelicts in my view.

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