Reason Roundup

Activists Demand Justice for Breonna Taylor, Whose Killers Are Still Employed as Louisville Cops

Plus: lightning strikes D.C., Buffalo cops suspended after knocking 75-year-old man to ground, and more...

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Today, Breonna Taylor should be celebrating her 27th birthday. Instead, she was senselessly killed by Louisville police officers in a no-knock raid on March 13, during which cops targeted her house in the middle of the night for no good reason and fired at least 20 bullets at the innocent residents. Nearly three months later, no charges have been filed and the police officers involved still have their jobs. The officers were simply placed on administrative leave.

Today, activists are trying to change that. They're encouraging people to send cards to the Kentucky attorney general asking that he bring charges against the officers who killed her.

Police said they were there on a drug raid, but no drugs were found. "We now know that Taylor wasn't even the person police were investigating. Their main suspect, Jamarcus Glover, and his accomplices were already in custody by the time the police raided Taylor's home," writes Radley Balko in a detailed look at why "the no-knock warrant for Breonna Taylor's home was illegal."

When Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, heard people breaking into their own, he grabbed his (legally owned) firearm. Walker—who said the plainclothes police did not identify themselves and that he had no reason to know they were law enforcement—allegedly fired at the intruders, hitting one in the leg and prompting them to open fire in return.

Walker was immediately arrested and charged with attempted murder and felonious assault, charges that have since been dismissed.

On Taylor's birthday today, activists are asking people to share art, poetry, music, or "anything that will remind people that she lived and that he life mattered," posting it to social media using the hashtags #SayHerName and #BirthdayForBreonna.

In addition, a vigil and balloon release in Taylor's honor is planned for tomorrow, June 6, at the Louisville Metro Hall of Justice.

So far, Taylor has not been as central to recent anti-police-brutality protests as her male counterparts who were killed by police. "I think with the protests that have been happening in George Floyd's name, it kind of got really easy and convenient to forget" Taylor, activist Cate Young told Distractify.

"Many black women have been left wondering when their equally tragic deaths, at the hands of police, will spark the same level of outrage," writes Kamilah Newton at Yahoo.

"Black women created this call to action because we continue to wrongly talk about the generations-long crisis of police and vigilante violence in a gendered way, as if it only happens to Black men," writes musician John Legend:

On Breonna's 27th birthday, I say her name and the names of Eleanor Bumpers, Atatiana Jefferson, Nina Pop, Aiyana Jones, Sandra Bland, Korryn Gaines, Pamela Turner, Tyisha Miller, Miriam Carey, Chynal Lindsey, Shelly Frey, Darnisha Harris, and too many more.

In the wake of protests over Taylor's death, Louisville's mayor "instituted a new policy requiring 'no knock' warrants to be endorsed by the police chief or someone designated by the chief before being sent to a judge for approval. Last week, the mayor temporarily suspended all 'no knock' warrants," notes The New York Times.

The FBI is now investigating Taylor's death, along with the death of Louisville restaurant owner David McAtee, who was killed by Louisville cops on Sunday. The city's chief of police resigned this week.


QUICK HITS

• Two Buffalo, New York, police officers have been suspended after they were shown on video knocking an elderly man to the ground and then failing to help him as he bleeds onto the sidewalk. The department initially tried to claim that the man tripped.

• Meanwhile, in D.C.:

• A judge has ruled that all three defendants charged in the death of Ahmaud Arbery will stand trial.

• "The Wisconsin Court of Appeals has finally ended the madness that began with terroristic threat and disorderly conduct charges being leveled against a middle school student" for drawing a picture of a bomb.

• The Texas Department of Public Safety had to reassure people that post-its left on parked cars in Lubbock "were from a hail damage repair company, not sex trafficking ploys."

The New York Times is now trying to walk back running an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R–Ark.) by claiming that the publication had not followed normal procedures. Cotton disputes that anything was out of the ordinary:

• Psssst:

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  1. The New York Times is now trying to walk back running an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R–Ark.) by claiming that the publication had not followed normal procedures.

    Formal procedures to insulate its readership.

    1. Hello.

      Is it true Floyd did time for sticking a gun in a pregnant woman’s stomach as his friends robbed her house?

      Too soon?

      /ducks.

      1. Apparently, after turning his life around, that gave him the necessary experience to work as a security guard.

        1. He was a good boy just trying to turn his life around. Another gentle giant killed by racist white pigs.

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        2. Remembering what a PITA it was to get confirmation from any government entity in the State of Minnesota, about whether Philando Castile did or didn’t have a license to carry for the handgun he had, are we sure Floyd kept his nose clean while in Minnesota? I mean, other than the fentanyl and meth he allegedly had in his system when he died.

          Unusual to expect a guy who did some time in prison for home invasion robbery, to suddenly shape up and fly right, but maybe Floyd was a follower and getting him out of the thieving and drugs environment he grew up in was enough to induce him to start mostly following the law? He also could have simply decided he was getting too old for the thugging life.

          Anyway, I think Minnesota’s lack of centralization for their criminal history paperwork may be a reason why we think Floyd didn’t commit any crimes in Minnesota. Not that our media is all that motivated to go digging here.

          1. Yeh well his funeral – a showcase in appalling hypocrisy – preempted The People’s Court!

            Imagine. People can’t see dying family members but this guy gets a televised funeral with no social distancing.

            But I’m sure ENB will find a way to make it look like we’re the crazy ones.

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          2. It honestly doesn’t matter.
            Whatever Floyd did previously changes nothing about how he was killed (not saying anyone’s saying that).
            No, he shouldn’t be a martyr with a televised funeral and scholarships in his name and such, but it is what it is.
            Now the stories will come out that he was a pos – but thats unimportant. Thats playing the game the way they want you to play it.
            Going into the dude’s past will only re-entrench people in their positions, fighting over irrelevant details.
            We need to oppose the cultural revolution and Marxist totalitarianism.
            Floyd’s character doesn’t change that fight.
            Don’t let that detail become a distraction

            1. He didn’t deserve to die like that. For sure. It was awful.

              No one is saying some changes need to be considered – ie qualified immunity, end war on drugs etc.

              But let’s not turn people into martyrs either.

              1. “But let’s not turn people into martyrs either.”

                Too late.
                Not important now

            2. True, but you’re assuming there’s any flexibility in the narrative now.

            3. Holy shit Nardz. I completely agree with you. Very well said.

          3. Floyd was on drugs when he was killed. His life had not been turned around. He was attempting to, but from all reports he strayed back into his old life frequently.

            1. Are drugs bad?

            2. everyone is on drugs, all the time. Some are legal some are not. Who cares? Only statist bootlickers care.

              1. Or people looking at situations rationally. People dont act the same on and off of drugs. Drugs can escalate situations.

                You dont have to deny reality to be for drug freedoms.

        3. Weirdly, Floyd and Chauvin worked as bouncers at the same strip club last year, but probably didn’t know each other.

          https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/chauvin-floyd-club-employment/

          1. I just heard they knew each other for 17 years?

            1. What? Really?

              1. I already forgot where I came across it.

                Don’t take it for more than it is.

                1. I’m not. It doesn’t sound likely.

                  1. The club owner said they worked at the same time but she had a large security staff and didn’t think they knew each other. She did say that Chauvin was a hothead who would go off on people without good reason.

            2. Snopes. O.K. Not surprising you go to them. Was Politifact getting DDoS’d or something?

              Different shifts, if it’s a pretty big Latin dance hall/nightclub like we have down here, maybe it was so big they didn’t bump into each other. I doubt it, but it’s possible.

              I still think this smells more like a personal dispute than garden-variety Officer Friendly screwing up. See what the other three cops have to say about it. In either case, Chauvin looks guilty of some variety of murder, the way Minnesota defines it.

              If it was a case of ordinary policing in Today’s America, pointing out that the victim had an extensive criminal history is relevant to answering the question of why the police officer felt it necessary to use force to complete the arrest. Tony Thug can be reasonably expected to forcefully resist being arrested. Charlie Cleanrecord, less so.

              1. I still think this smells more like a personal dispute than garden-variety Officer Friendly screwing up.

                Bingo. Like something from The Shield

              2. “If it was a case of ordinary policing in Today’s America, pointing out that the victim had an extensive criminal history is relevant to answering the question of why the police officer felt it necessary to use force to complete the arrest. Tony Thug can be reasonably expected to forcefully resist being arrested. Charlie Cleanrecord, less so.”

                True, but the force used was improper even if he had been resisting.
                Why fight a battle for a strategically irrelevant hill?

                1. Exactly this.

                  People on the Right have been trying to bust the god damn public unions for YEARS. And even when we DO bust the public unions, the Police Unions almost always get spared (c.f. Gov Walker, Minnesota). We can finally do it. Hold your nose if you must, but stop disagreeing with the people who are demanding you give them what you want!

                2. There wasn’t a big need to escalate the situation.

                  Floyd had a violent history, but in this case it was a phony $20 bill. I’ve seen speculation that there were concerns he might drive the car intoxicated, but that could be dealt with by taking the keys or booting the car.

            3. Not saying this is so, but it would be the weirdest plot twist to this while f’d up situation if it turned out they know each other and had some personal animosity between them.

          2. Dude, you are WAAAAAAAY late on this. It’s been common knowledge for a while and commenters have already brought it up.

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      2. Too late.

        George has already been elevated to sainthood.

        1. Do African-American Baptist churches have a claim to apostolic succession?

          1. Black Lives Matter is essentially a religious movement now, so that will be forthcoming.

      3. Yes but being a porn star negates that experience.

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      1. To be fair, we all know that Cotton is worse than Hitler.

      2. “I was in the land of Cotton, Old times there are not forgotten Look away!” – NYTimes

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  2. Fist man, grab a coffee or summink I sat here for three minutes waiting on you to post something snappy

    You feeling ok bud?

  3. Apropos of, well, everything: a reminder that @reason did a how-to issue with instructions on breaking zip ties, jury nullification, off-grid living, digital privacy, and much more…

    Wasn’t cool back then.

  4. The New York Times is now trying to walk back running an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R–Ark.) by claiming that the publication had not followed normal procedures. Cotton disputes that anything was out of the ordinary:

    Normal procedures for the NY Times:
    https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/06/opinion/pedophilia-a-disorder-not-a-crime.html
    Opinion
    OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

    Pedophilia: A Disorder, Not a Crime
    By Margo Kaplan
    Oct. 5, 2014

    1. Back when buttplug wrote with passion.

    2. Strictly speaking pedophilia is a sexual orientation. Child abuse is a crime. But I know people love to FREAK OUT about this article, as if it’s on par with puff pieces for Hitler, Putin and Mao.

  5. “Employment stunningly rose by 2.5 million in May and the jobless rate declined to 13.3%”
    Start the countdown to claims that Trump cooked these figures in 5 … 4 …

    1. https://twitter.com/JamesHasson20/status/1268887348638597120
      The jobs report adding 2.5 million jobs instead of losing the 7.5 million jobs economists forecasted is just another example of “lol nobody knows anything anymore.”

      WaPo forgot to change their pre-written URL about a “grim milestone”

      1. I dont know why people are shocked. Many non leftist economists knew an artificial recession backed off of an event and not market failure can recover quickly. Even Obama’s lackeys have been running around warning of this fast recovery.

        1. Especially one in which most people have maintained all or a significant portion of their income. In many ways, it is similar to after WW2 where people had money in their pocket but no place to spend it until businesses retooled and suddenly everything boomed. People are itching to go out again and spend.

          The major losses, though, will be small businesses who were already on the cusp.

    2. Local news. Did you hear that Suderman tweeted about lightning striking the Washington monument, though?

    3. Trump is all over Twitter boasting about the upswing in employment this morning, and it’s his right. As he himself said, “Whatever happens, you’re responsible.

      If it doesn’t happen, you’re responsible.” That has always been the rules in America for judging Presidents — they get credit or blame for whatever happens on their watch, whether they had anything to do with it or not. In this case, it was state governors and mayors who started reopening, so that people could go back to work.

      And, of course, Trump also famously said: “I don’t take responsibility at all.”

      1. Ha. Look at you. All sad some people got their jobs back.

        1. If they arent going g to die, the least they could do is stay destitute latest through the election.

        2. Actually, I’m really happy about it.

      2. Hmm, and it was state governors and mayors who closed in the first place.

        #LibertariansForCentralizedGovernment

        It’s a thing.

        1. That is also true.

          1. Glad you agree you’re unprincipled. Makes growth easier.

      3. It’s so weird. You obviously understand that a president isnt the primary reason for many things based on your statement… but you’re upset that Trump said so.

        1. I’m not that upset. He gets to take credit. It’s how the Presidential politics game is played in this country.

          But I’m also gonna point out how he’s a big gasbag full of b.s.

          1. because their are still people out there you are going to respond “hey, I never noticed that before”?

            1. Have you been reading some of the commenters here?

      4. “…In this case, it was state governors and mayors who started reopening, so that people could go back to work…”

        The people who put them out of work?
        ‘Gee, let’s cause a disaster and then fix it to claim credit!’
        Those people you pathetic scumbag?
        And they are doing so since they have no choice; Trump is pushing them and people are just flat ignoring the shut-down.

        1. I imagine Pho’s brain is hundreds of tiny compartments that don’t communicate with each other.

          1. He’s got a point.
            No, he doesn’t.
            Yes, he does.

        2. Trump supported the lockdowns, and simultaneously didn’t support them. He does that.

          1. Hmmm, kinda like Reason then? They do that.

            And nothing was more precious than the same people who spouted anything for freedom and fuck the laws were the same ones shitting their pants when Trump claimed that he had the authority to start opening up… because of laws.

            1. Yes, Reason has long had a policy of encouraging a wide spectrum of voices from their writers and guest writers.

              They’ve always been that way, especially on their blog. The magazine is traditionally edited, with each issue tending to have a theme and a coherent point of view.

            2. This is a much more valid take on Reason than “they are pushing a woke narrative”. Their writers say a lot shit, sometimes contradictory.

              1. Nothing says libertarian more than a fickle monarchy, I find.

                You certainly seem to think so.

  6. https://thefederalist.com/2020/06/04/the-struggle-sessions-are-here-and-theyre-not-going-away/
    The model at work here is the Chinese Cultural Revolution, with its mass “struggle sessions” in which anyone deemed insufficiently sympathetic to the proletariat, or thought to have an excessively bourgeois lifestyle, was subjected to public humiliations, paraded through the streets, assaulted, denounced, and put on display as objects of scorn. Often these struggle sessions ended in false confessions and pleas for mercy.

    1. Broke: burning buildings isn’t violence
      Woke : Non-violence is an important tool for protests, but so is violence.
      https://twitter.com/Slate/status/1268415955937513473

      1. https://twitter.com/JamesOKeefeIII/status/1268890514172100613
        BREAKING:
        @Project_Veritas
        inside NYC ANTIFA

        “Get a good liver or kidney shot, it’s pretty much crippling them”

        “Break one of the floating ribs”

        “Reframe the idea of self-defense…not simply you’re being acted upon by an aggressor” #EXPOSEANTIFA

        1. #PeacefulProtests

        2. I seem to remember there was something there about eye-gouging too.

    2. Aside on the ChiComs: where’s the news of massive protests there on the anniversary of the killing of all of those kids at Tiananmen Square? I thought the Chinese government was going to be paralyzed by all of the disorder? South China Morning Post and Asia Times don’t mention anything like that. Lots of gloating over the US’s plight, but no mention of massive protesting, in Hong Kong or anywhere else.

      Might it be that the CCP, with assistance from companies like Alphabet, mercilessly hunted down and liquidated all of the protest leaders and potential leaders before now?

      1. Just a private company doing private things.

      2. Yep.
        Looks like all was quiet on that one.
        The mass of the preceding weeks seems to have worked

        1. *mass arrests

      3. Well in Reason’s defense, there is an article about how what’s happening here is similar to Tiananmen Square. Gonna have to be close enough for you.

        1. That’s a special kind of stupid even for Reason.

  7. So many great suggestions for creating a world that respects black bodies. Here’s Alyssa Rosenberg from the Washington Post:

    If Hollywood is serious about combating police brutality, it will pause production on ever[y] police procedural and movie and take a hard look at the stories it’s telling

    Indeed, George Floyd might be alive today if CSI and Law & Order weren’t so popular.

    #LibertariansForCancelingProblematicTVShows

    1. Ghost of Tipper Gore’s flapping twat.

      1. Hey now! Al Gore learned how to kiss that flapping twat.

    2. I’m in. Most of those are pro-cop propaganda. Particularly the CSI type shows that show infallible SCIENCE!!! catching bad guys.

      1. LOL! Coincidence, or Freudian slip?

        Rufus The Monocled
        June.5.2020 at 10:09 am
        Ghost of Tipper Gore’s flapping twat.

        Ra’s al Gore
        June.5.2020 at 10:09 am
        I’m in.

    3. Why don’t you go fuck yourself, GOP cretin?

      1. If he were a child you’d do it for him

      2. You really need to take Ms. Rosenberg’s suggestion seriously. There’s no telling how much damage has resulted from this year’s release of Bad Boys for Life.

        #EvenBlackCopMoviesAreProblematic

        1. I liked Bad Boys 2.
          Fun movie.
          But it always struck me that they did tens of millions of dollars worth of damage to the city, endangered hundreds of people (high speed chase where they’re using cars as projectiles on a crowded highway), and INVADED CUBA… to catch an extasy dealer

      3. Hey Peanut. He’s clearly a liberal-tarian. I would imagine you guys agree on more than you disagree.

      1. Lego CEO (thinking they’re reading American history right from Copenhagen:

        “Introducing the Lego Belle Plantation set! Ta-dah!”

        /stunned faces. One click of camera.

    4. Ha. It always struck me how perfect those Laws & Orders serieses were at showing righteous law enforcement treating everyone they encounter with utter contempt and hostility.

    5. I knew this was going to come up eventually. Hollywood is the biggest cop-sucking industry on the planet, especially when Democrats are running the country, and it doesn’t matter how many Muslims, trannies, or gay officers you portray, you’re still representing a group that the new religious movement despises.

  8. “The Wisconsin Court of Appeals has finally ended the madness that began with terroristic threat and disorderly conduct charges being leveled against a middle school student” for drawing a picture of a bomb.

    Did the Court draw a picture of the multi-million-dollar payment to the student for having his Constitutional rights violated?

    1. “All logic goes out the window when school administrators come across something that makes them feel slightly uncomfortable. ”

      From the TechDirt article.

      Applies equally to The NY Times apparently.

      1. “All logic goes out the window when school administrators any government employees with authority come across something that makes them feel slightly uncomfortable. ”

  9. Walker—who said the plainclothes police did not identify themselves and that he had no reason to know they were law enforcement—allegedly fired at the intruders, hitting one in the leg and prompting them to open fire in return.

    Any journalists out there, here’s a tip. Whenever you have the chance to interview a police chief or some other official who is an expert law enforcement officer, ask them what advice they would give the law abiding citizen to protect themselves when home intruders who are not police break into their homes impersonating police.

    Or, more relevant today, what should the citizen do when he or she is on the street and witnesses police officers killing a shackled and prone citizen. How would a police chief suggest a person save a life like that. What actions in that moment would a concerned law enforcement authority suggest a person take?

    1. I am neither a cop nor a lawyer. I have read that decent advice for bystanders to the Floyd situation involve calling 911 and asking for fire/paramedics to show up for a man having a medical emergency where he can’t breathe and is turning blue. Also, call 911, and ask for a supervisor to be sent to the scene.

      If you yourself are an EMT/Paramedic, and feel like getting involved, introducing yourself to the officers as one, and calmly telling them that you’re going to treat a patient who’s in the middle of a medical emergency—be specific about the symptoms you are observing—might also work. At least it might get through to the other three, not emotionally involved, cops that this guy might get them all fired or worse if he ends up killing this guy.

      Good luck.

      1. Second paragraph sounds like a good way to get shot.

        1. Yep. I have a coworker who said that he would have tackled the cop if he had been there, and taken the arrest. I tried telling him that he’d probably be shot for doing so.

          1. He wouldn’t have done it and they would have if he did.

          2. Well, he’s a moron.

    2. Have your local Democratic Wardsman on speed dial and your dues paid up?

      Otherwise I got nuthin.

      1. The point is, I’d like to see policy makers in law enforcement, many of whom often express their commitment to the safety of law abiding citizens, grapple on record with the conflict between citizen safety and the absolute obedience demanded for anyone claiming to be police.

  10. A judge has ruled that all three defendants charged in the death of Ahmaud Arbery will stand trial.

    A certain judge doesn’t want his house razed.

    1. Mob rule is the new passion of people.

    2. I thought indictments came from Grand Juries.

  11. https://twitter.com/ClayTravis/status/1268576670094626822
    It took LeBron James twenty minutes to rip Drew Brees for his opinion on the national anthem yet he still hasn’t said a word in months about his buddies in China putting Hong Kong protesters in jail for three years if they disrespect the anthem there. Fascinating.

    1. Not as fascinating as predictable – – – – – – – – –

    2. Not good to badmouth the boss.

  12. The Texas Department of Public Safety had to reassure people that post-its left on parked cars in Lubbock “were from a hail damage repair company, not sex trafficking ploys.”

    Broke: Victim of weather.

    Woke: Victim of sex traffickers.

  13. Brees’ wife: Don’t say a word.
    Brees: Why? They love me. We’re good folk.

    /tongue to lips. Naively types away.

    Five seconds later.

    Brees: What the fuck just happened?

    The wrath of illogical illiberalism laced with emotion is what happened Drew.

    1. How a mob formed on brees for him simply saying he doesnt agree with the anthem being played as the time for protests is breathtaking. It is fucking disgusting. He got brow beat for simply asking to do it at a different moment.

  14. https://dailycaller.com/2020/06/04/tucker-carlson-big-corporations-paying-for-riots/

    The Daily Caller founder speculated that corporations may “think they can look good for the mob by funding their cause,” and are responsible for such beliefs as the Black Lives Matter Foundation’s goal to “disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure.”

    “Well, that is certainly a goal major corporations can get behind,” Carlson said sardonically. “People who aren’t encumbered by families won’t be distracted from being the dutiful little worker bees they like most.”

    …“Because for a lot of big corporations, the total annihilation of small businesses is one of the best parts of this new revolution,” he concluded. “There’s always an angle. Someone’s always getting more powerful.”

  15. More bad economic news.

    Reason.com’s benefactor Charles Koch is now only the 17th richest person on the planet.

    His $53,000,000,000 net worth represents a decline of over $9 billion this year. And it’s entirely due to Drumpf’s high-tariff / low-immigration policies.

    #OpenTheBordersToHelpCharlesKoch

  16. Please stop with all the Twitter crap.

    1. And do actual research? Surely you just.

        1. Surely you just is the new I can’t even.

          1. To be sure

            1. That’s so yesterday. It’s 2020.

              1. 2020 is problematic

  17. The department initially tried to claim that the man tripped.

    “Oh, there’s video?”

  18. https://twitter.com/JamesEHiggins/status/1268771132162932736
    If you’re considering #GoBaldforBLM, consider this: shaving women’s heads was what French partisans did to women after the end of Occupation to mark and shame those who had been Nazi collaborators. Get it? The people urging you to do this know the history even if you don’t.

    1. “Shave your head, Becky, or you support genocide”

      1. “And while you’re at it, shave down there.”

        1. That rug really tied the room together.

          1. Well played.

        2. Girl, I wanna shave you down
          Get rid of all that muff you don’t need

          1. Everyone likes a clean working surface.

  19. “Employment stunningly rose by 2.5 million in May and the jobless rate declined to 13.3%”

    I am shocked, SHOCKED to hear that!

    1. The books are fixed!

      Paul Krugman

      @paulkrugman
      Well, the BLS reports a GAIN in jobs and a FALL in unemployment, which almost nobody saw coming. Maybe it’s true, and the BLS is definitely doing its best, but you do have to wonder what’s going on. 1/

      Paul Krugman

      @paulkrugman
      · 3h
      Replying to @paulkrugman
      I’ve been through a number of episodes over the years in which official numbers tell a story at odds with what more informal evidence suggests; often it turns out that there was something quirky (NOT fraudulent) about the official numbers. 2/

      Paul Krugman

      @paulkrugman
      This being the Trump era, you can’t completely discount the possibility that they’ve gotten to the BLS, but it’s much more likely that the models used to produce these numbers — they aren’t really raw data — have gone haywire in a time of pandemic 3/

      1. Paul Krugman should be treated with nothing but derision and skepticism.

  20. Wow… the commentariat was willing to take up arms against the cops when some welfare cheat took over a Park at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge because he wouldn’t pay his bills. Now, they’re willing to let the cops kick and stomp people because they have the audacity to not want to be murdered by a cop. Telling.

    1. You try way too hard.

      1. Were you here during the Bundy Revolution? He was probably the greatest hero to the peanuts here since Timothy McVeigh.

        1. “Were you here during the Bundy Revolution?”
          Do you ever post without lying?

        2. Were you here during the Bundy Revolution?

          When you were still going by “Palin’s Buttplug”?

          Yeah I was.

          He was probably the greatest hero

          Winners attract followings. One day you may experience it first hand and find out for yourself.

        3. You are aware that McVeigh was a devout Marxist? Or did they gloss over that in clinger training?

        4. You dont understand the difference between a small group entering an unmanned station and a riot that has killed 1e people, cost tens of millions in destruction, arson, rapes, assaults…

          How fucking dumb are you?

          If the protests remained peaceful nobody here would say shit against it

          1. 13 people*

            1. numbers are hard. For some *looks at AmSoc* logic is even harder.

              1. Do numbers have anything to do with mortgages? Asking for a friend.

      2. And accomplish WAY too little…

    2. I guess I missed it when Bundy and his friends burned down dozens (hundreds?) of government buildings and private store fronts (or even the one building they occupied).

      1. Yeah, I wonder what would happen to BLM activists if they started training their assault rifles on the National Guard.

        1. Well we’ve seen what happens when they assassinate 5.

        2. “Yeah, I wonder what would happen to BLM activists if they started training their assault rifles on the National Guard.”

          Need help pushing the goal post? Maybe you can get that scumbag Tony to help.

  21. In the wake of protests over Taylor’s death, Louisville’s mayor “instituted a new policy requiring ‘no knock’ warrants to be endorsed by the police chief or someone designated by the chief before being sent to a judge for approval.

    Some judge’s rubber stamp just got a little lighter.

    1. Shifting the burden to the police chief to do the rubber stamping.

    2. There is a push to end the practice altogether, but as expected, is being held up in exploratory committees and the like. Not to mention BLM has taken over the protest there, so applying pressure to get a concrete reform is essentially gone (even though it is specifically what the family has requested).

      It’s a damn shame there wasn’t video of the incident, as the entirety of the protest seems to be an exercise in psy-ops rather than getting anything done.

  22. CDC director: US needs up to 100,000 contact tracers by September to fight coronavirus
    https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/501157-cdc-director-us-needs-30-to-100-thousand-contact-tracers-by-september-to

    1. But if your contacts are fellow antifa, feel free to not mention them.

    2. Suddenly, Public Health Officials Say Social Justice Matters More Than Social Distance
      https://www.politico.com/news/magazine/2020/06/04/public-health-protests-301534

  23. Must be a coincidence that every police brutality or killing case is a black victim.

    White folks never die at the hands of the police?

    Just asking. I’m sure an objective sounding organization like REASON wouldn’t have one-sided reporting.

    1. They’re reported on Houston and other situations with white victims.

      I’m not “white-knighting” for Reason, but simply pointing out what they’ve covered.

      1. “I’m not “white-knighting” for Reason”

        No, you are, you just happen to be correct.

      2. You’re right. They’re consistent on the subject. No complaints.

        Just this protest/riot thing is a little irritating and so I’ll bust ENB over that.

        1. For as much as I (rightly) criticize Reason, it is refreshing to see that when they recap the incident, at least the few times I’ve skimmed articles on it, they refer to Floyd as an “unarmed man” instead of as an “unarmed black man”.

          Looks like the commisar has been a bit careless

        2. Not always consistent, see their Bundy articles.

      3. Wow, they’ve got you apologizing for “white knighting” Reason! Look, we are all here, on Reason’s website. It shouldn’t be a thing to be ashamed of to admit you like Reason when you are hanging out at Reason.

        1. We understand you desperately want a uniform thought bubble to live in. Some of us remember this site before the wokeish turn. You didnt because you just repeat narratives without critical thought.

    2. Not a coincidence, but filtering to match the narrative.

      All hail the narrative!

      1. What narrative? That cops shouldn’t murder Black people?

        1. Have you seen lots of blacks marching to protest cops killing whitey? I’ve seen millions of whites doing the reverse.

          Logically, if some attention was paid to innocent whites getting murdered by cops, blacks would make much more progress shining the light on the real problem: ABUSIVE COPS

          1. Tom sees the meaning in all the negative spaces. He knows exactly what people are up to when they don’t talk about something and choose to talk about something else.

            1. Not everyone is a dumb as you are.

            2. I don’t know if this is true. He lists his sources in a 2nd tweet but I didn’t have time to follow up.

              @LeonydusJohnson
              For every 10,000 black people arrested for violent crime, 3 are killed

              For every 10,000 white people arrested for violent crime, 4 are killed

              I’m going to keep tweeting this until someone can explain to me how this is possible if there is truly pervasive racial bias in policingo follow up.

              https://twitter.com/LeonydusJohnson/status/1267466345844740098?s=20

              1. There was also the guy who linked to an article that showed for every police encounter that ended in death, there was no racial trend. Once you encounter a cop, your chances of death are the same no matter what your race is. With that said, racial minorities were more likely to have an encounter with a cop. Regardless, I think deaths per police interaction is a pretty good metric.

        2. In worker’s paradise, cops only murder farmers, doctors, political rivals, people who try have private property, people who are smiling and anyone one who sounds like they might question worker’s paradise. Worker’s paradise won’t see color though!

        3. Cops shouldn’t murder anyone racist. See Tony Timpa

  24. Me: Crazy out there eh? I mean, Floyd gets a funeral but the rest of us can’t?
    Friend: EVERYONE needs a beating.Remember the time when Jean-Luc tripped Bruno and Bruno beat the crap out of him and the benches cleared? Yeh, that’s what we need now.

    Honk, honk.

    1. Remember the time when Jean-Luc tripped Bruno

      Too Canadian.

  25. I was at this protest earlier today and it was one of the most peaceful gatherings I’ve ever been to: everyone was silent for over 30 mins!

    Could have done that at home and saved some grandmas.

    1. Al Sharpton, during his “eulogy” for George Floyd, drew a distinction between peace and silence.

  26. “Walker was immediately arrested and charged with attempted murder and felonious assault, charges that have since been dismissed.”

    Ooh, doesn’t look good for the police…

    “Many black women have been left wondering when their equally tragic deaths, at the hands of police, will spark the same level of outrage”

    Instead of intersectional posturing, why not acknowledge incidents like Houston where white people got shot?

    Or in other words, acknowledge them, but not *qua* white people or as members of any race, but take a look at the whole picture of police abuse.

  27. Oh, good. I can stop paying taxes and buy any gun I want. Who is going to enforce the laws? Ah, that’s right, the woke FBI.

    Riots Are Part of Weeklong Campaign to Defund Police. In Some Places It’s Working.
    https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/victoria-taft/2020/06/04/riots-are-part-of-weeklong-campaign-to-defund-police-in-some-places-its-working-n492237

    1. https://hotair.com/archives/ed-morrissey/2020/06/04/new-hotness-celebrity-elite-demand-defunding-police-departments/

      Will every celebrity that signs this petition also pledge not to ever hire private security again for the rest of their lives? If they want to consign the rest of us to live without police protection — those who can’t afford to buy protection and justice — they should be willing to live under the same conditions. Right? No more gated communities, no more security for their homes or concerts. If the rest of us can’t have our businesses protected by the police, why should they be able to hire their own?

      1. https://newrepublic.com/article/157984/defunding-police-good-climate-policy
        Defunding the Police Is Good Climate Policy
        Budgets are about to get tight. States and cities should direct money to programs that truly make communities more secure.

      2. Tsk. You just don’t understand.

      3. In spirit I agree Ra, but in practice, the PoPo don’t protect shit. They show up afterwords to write reports and shoot dogs.

        1. They could be used to protect shit. This week is a great example. However, the retardation of the politicians above them doom everyone to failure.

        2. They protect Pelosi’s house. They protect their masters. The rest is a crap shoot.

          1. 75 cops are protecting Mayor Groot’s house in Chicago and she hates the cops.

        3. ^ This.

          How many times a year does your local police force actually interrupt a violent crime in progress? I’m guessing it’s 0 and maybe 1 if some cop gets lucky timing on his side. Everything else they do is harassment of citizens for minor shit no one really cares about.

      4. Since we’re in the hole fiscally, how about a sales tax on personal protection services?

      5. nothing makes a cop more trigger happy then knowing there is no one to back him up due to budget cuts..

        cutting budgets doesn’t reduce racism but it does make cops madder

      6. Will every celebrity that signs this petition also pledge not to ever hire private security again for the rest of their lives?

        you’re getting it backwards. In a world with a much reduced public police force private security is essential.

    2. Laws will be enforced by antifa. Totally not like Hitler’s brownshirts.

      1. True; how about Mussolini’s blackshirts?
        Exact fit.

        1. I know that all of world history basically just consists of WWII and there’s no need to ever reference anything outside of that since it works as such a nice tidy narrative with a bow on top, but I think the Bolsheviks are probably the more apt comparison here. They actually want Antifa to cause chaos so conservatives run to the police asking for protection and new legislation while liberals run to the police asking for “reforms”, new legislation and protection. We all scream at each other at the top of our lungs and the political class wins. Its so much easier to run the world when the peasants are trying to kill each other instead of the people that are actually responsible.

          1. Again, very convenient they got riots over “racism” instead of mass revolt over totalitarian lockdowns based on bs “science” and fear mongering.
            Very, very convenient

            1. I’m not denying that the media is doing everything in their power to fan the flames. I’m just pointing out that the logical result of what each side (being the major party voters) wants is giving the state more power and social dependency.

              To paraphrase the wise philosopher Homer Simpson, “Mmmmm government. The cause of AND solution to, all of life’s problems.

              1. Expecting the police and failing that the national guard to provide the protection they are obligated to is hardly giving the state more power. Now if you want to make the case that even that shouldn’t be the responsibility of government and every citizen should defend themselves, then make it.

  28. I exhanged several tweets with Matt Welch today. He responded quickly to every one, less than a minute.

    I mentioned his mag had gone downhill lately and gave an example that the biggest story of the last 4 years has been turned upside down and it is indisputable that Obama and Co. were involved in an illegal coup attempt and that nobody at REASON seemed interested.

    Matt promptly disappeared.

    1. linky?

      1. DeBlasio got booed off stage, Matt sarcastically tweeted “hate to see it”.

        Beginning of my reply exchange

        https://twitter.com/emotionalstoic/status/1268726435859984385?s=20

        1. Uggg… your twitter page is a mess of GOP crackpottery. Can you make your obsessions with Matt Welch private, please? No one needs to see that.

          1. Turd says what?

          2. In worker’s paradise, no one needs to see or know anything that glorious worker’s paradise leadership decides that they don’t. Knowing to much is grounds for correction by people’s roaming firing squads of People’s Justice.

          3. Hey Peanut. Relax you seem mad for some reason.

        2. When I want to have a dialog with someone, I usually open by calling them a fraud. Stupid cowards always run away.

          1. I didn’t open by calling him a fraud. Fraud was the conclusion.

    2. Obama and Co. were involved in an illegal coup attempt and that nobody at REASON seemed interested

      Yeah, why won’t Reason adopt the Alex Jones model?

      1. Vacuous as usual.

        1. You’re a conspiratorial idiot.

          Like most wingnuts are.

          1. Vacuous again.

      2. Too busy being Rachel Maddow.

        1. Can you imagine combining them? Rachel Maddow with Soave’s hair would be an unstoppable force.

          1. Hmm, which sexual preference would win out?

            1. All of them.

    3. Local story. Orange man bad.

    4. Maybe because your beliefs are an exaggerated take on what actually happened, and it is, by far, not the biggest story of the last four years.

      1. I see where you’re going, more like the biggest story of the last four decades.

      2. Name one bigger. This is an open book exam. Nexus is allowed.

        1. A story bigger than #Obamagate?

          Umm, COVID-19.

          1. HAHAHAHAHAHA

            Yeah, the first case of an administration breaking the tradition of peaceful transition of power is less important than a plague that suddenly became irrelevant when you got angry.

  29. Would it be racist to ask, if black lives matter so much, why black people in America kill each other at such a staggering rate?

    The politically correct, inconvenient hard truth is that a black civilian in the United States is ten times more likely to be killed by another black civilian than to be killed by a law enforcement officer of any race. Yet these poor innocent victims of the rampant criminality and dysfunction in black America are lucky if they get more than about five seconds of media attention (sometimes not even that). By and large, they’re basically nameless and unknown.

    Frankly, I don’t think you lefties care about these people at all. I think you consider them an unfortunate price that has to be paid to maintain your iron grip on power. It’s immoral as all fucking hell to say that black lives only matter when they’re taken by a cop. It almost makes one suspect that it’s really much more about election year politics than it is about fixing problems.

    1. Would it be racist to ask

      Of course.

  30. https://twitter.com/MattWalshBlog/status/1268876063255465987
    The full video of the black guy telling the white woman to kneel and apologize is way worse than you think. The dude is trolling (which is hilarious) but he actually goes around the city for 45 minutes and gets a whole bunch of self-hating white masochists to kneel on command

    …I should also mention that in most cases he tells them to kneel for “George Foreman” and they’re too obedient to even correct him

    1. People are fucking scared sheep. Fuck that asshole, I don’t care if it was a joke people get fired in this environment for doing or saying anything remotely unwoke. It’s so fucked up.

      1. If people are scared sheep, they deserve it.

      2. Dude, this is some of the best cuckold porn ever.

        Don’t be pissing all over the artistic vision with your lame prudishness.

        Wait, can we work in golden showers?

    2. Bend the knee

  31. The latest twitterversy is evidently paying hotels to house national guard is a violation of the 3rd amendment, which now matters. The previous two still don’t.

  32. “When Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, heard people breaking into their own, he grabbed his (legally owned) firearm. Walker—who said the plainclothes police did not identify themselves and that he had no reason to know they were law enforcement—allegedly fired at the intruders, hitting one in the leg and prompting them to open fire in return.”

    If police safety is paramount (their argument), why do they not only continue to endanger both cops and civilians with no knock raids AND have the cops in PLAINCLOTHES???? Why wouldn’t the sensible policy just be to learn common times when they leave the house, surround them in broad day light, where they don’t have a chance to get weapons, and then execute a warranty to search the house safely?

    Then they wouldn’t get to use their super cool badass military toys and get that sweet adrenaline rush of kicking in a door to show people who’s boss? Sorry, silly question.

    1. If we do it your way we may never get to kill anyone.

      /frat of police

      1. My fear and contempt for cops was solidified when, after work cooking in a restaurant, the local police had taken over the bar. One particularly drunk officer was practically in tears over the fact that he hadn’t yet had the opportunity to kill someone. His buddies consoled him and told him he’d have his chance soon enough. Pretty disturbing.

        1. Not that I don’t believe that there are cops that join the force in order to legally exercise force and harm people, but this couldn’t sound more made up.

          1. “this couldn’t sound more made up.”

            I wish it was.

            They were also trading tips on the finer points of choking people. One cop in particular kept repeating a story about choking out a woman with his back to his car, and how good it felt when she went limp.

            They totally cleared the bar. Their talk was disturbing, and they were quite rowdy. Loud and knocking stuff over. But what are you gonna do when the cops take over your business and drive all the customers away? Call the cops?

            1. Next time dont fall asleep to a bad movie.

              1. You can stop sucking my dick now.

            2. I use to hear cops talk openly about planting evidence, keeping unregistered weapons in the trunk, and failing to respond to any calls for assistance of any female officer who had rejected their obvious charms.

              As I was just window dressing, I doubt they could care less.

              It happens.

              1. Qualified immunity is the shiznit.

    2. “Why wouldn’t the sensible policy just be to learn common times when they leave the house, surround them in broad day light, where they don’t have a chance to get weapons, and then execute a warranty to search the house safely?”

      They actually do those things when their victim is considered to be dangerous.

      1. If they don’t consider their victims dangerous, why are they involving SWAT teams. Sorry, I forgot about cool toys and adrenaline.

        1. They use these tactics because many officers are itching to kill someone. So they create a situation where they can get away with murder. That’s the sad and scary truth.

          1. There’s a few that this would be true for, sure. If this were a blanket truth there would be waaaayyy more killings than there actually are. I hate to have to say this about cops, but they are still individuals with their own motivations. Of course there are some that genuinely want to do good. I do think that entering that culture and getting a taste of that sweet qualified immunity and an unspoken benefit of the doubt in nearly every situation would be corrupting to just about anyone. We all have a bloodlust just waiting to get out whether we’re aware of it or not.

            1. “Of course there are some that genuinely want to do good.”

              Otherwise known as “pussies.” They don’t last long. They’re either corrupted or driven out.

    1. No evidence he was given a ghost position with ridiculous pay for absolutely no skill or experience?

      1. That’s pretty obvious. The question is whether he or Biden broke any laws in the Ukraine.

        1. I don’t think that has ever been a relevant question.

          The question is and always has been: Was the behavior of the Bidens corrupt? Corrupt, here, in the good old USA.

          I don’t think you can claim that it wasn’t with a straight face.

          Well, I’ve seen a bunch of people try. Well respected journalists are happy to describe it as the younger Biden simply cashing in on his father’s name.

          Which is pretty silly. Burisma hired a board full of politically connected westerners. They did it for a reason, and that reason isn’t that they are infatuated with the fame of the US vice president.

          There’s no valid argument that Burisma was doing anything other than buying influence.

          The only question is: Were they wasting their money, or did they get something in return for that investment?

          Biden’s supporters claim no. They claim that the incident that Biden bragged about where he strongarmed the Ukrainian government into firing their top prosecutor was just standing US policiy. Nothing more.

          That’s really the only place for argument. “What did Joe actually do for them?”

          Not “was it a crime in Ukraine to take a job at a Ukrainian company?”.

          We know the payoff occurred. You are delusional to think Junior’s job was anything other than an attempt to curry favor. Big multinational corporations like that don’t pay millions of dollars for people with no expertise at all. They pay because they think they are getting something more valuable in return. So we know that Burisma thought they were paying Biden off with the job for his kid.

          The only remaining question is about Biden’s actions.

          1. That’s fair enough, and the Senate has a right to do their investigation, as they are doing,

            It’s what the Republicans should have done in the first place instead of whatever the hell Trump was up to with Giuliani and foreign aid and phone calls.

            1. And what was he up to, Jeff?

              Come on, spell out your conspiracy wank for us.

            2. They asked ukraine to look into Burismas actions dummy, not Hunters.

              1. “The other thing, There’s a lot of talk about Biden’s son, that Biden stopped the prosecution and a lot of people want to find out about that so whatever you can do with the Attorney General would be great.”

                Stop gaslighting.

                1. Great advice, you should take it, you dishonest fuck.

        2. Like being given a ghost position for preferential access to the VPOTUS? That is a great question.

        3. “…The question is whether he or Biden broke any laws in the Ukraine.”

          That question is important to you and the people in Ukraine, not to anyone else.

      2. “he or Biden”, of course meant Hunter or Joe.

        Anyway, this is the investigation Trump wanted the Ukraine to do. They did it, and came up with nothing.

        And Zelenskiy is signaling he doesn’t want the Ukraine to be used as a pawn in U.S. politics, anymore.

        1. And Zelenskiy is signaling he doesn’t want the Ukraine to be used as a pawn in U.S. politics, anymore.

          So… 2016 was enough?

          1. Combined with 2019.

            1. Oh, you mean where you fabricated some supposed treason while ignoring the corruption and abuse of power by Biden?

              Yeah, that is tedious.

        2. For which I can’t blame him. That’s a lose-lose.

          And it isn’t like stopping companies from buying foreign government influence is a winner either. Those same companies are very powerful internally too.

          Her in the US, we can’t even keep space contractors from influencing the congress to mandate a rocket system that is orders of magnitude too expensive and doesn’t fit the missions we want to do. And those tens of billions are small potatoes compared to the other influences out there.

          1. 50 years of small potatoes got us $24TT in debt and the same damn slogans.

            But it’ll be different this time.

            1. This time we’ll pile another 10 on that stack of trillion dollar coins in just a year’s time. So….

              Uh….

              USA! USA! USA!

    2. The question was never of Hunter did something illegal dummy. It was about a company paying him off for influence.

      How fucking dumb are you?

      1. Twenty yard penalty for goal post moving.

        It’s obvious Hunter Biden was given a cushy spot on the Burisma board for his influence. Nobody needs an investigation to determine that. An investigation, by definition, would be to find something illegal.

        1. Actually, I should say it’s obvious he was put on the board for his name. I have no idea what the Ukrainian influence peddling laws are, but the Ukrainians investigated and found nothing illegal.

          If someone is expecting the Ukrainian investigation to go beyond questions of legality, and opine on the ethics of the arrangement, they aren’t going to do that.

  33. “Many black women have been left wondering when their equally tragic deaths, at the hands of police, will spark the same level of outrage,”

    One might think the woke progressive socialist radical left was sexist.

  34. A pretty detailed but by no means exhaustive chronicle of recent police violence against unarmed protesters

    https://www.jacobinmag.com/2020/06/police-riot-brutality-george-floyd-protests

    1. We all agree cops are often violent and abusive assholes.

      However, some believe that burning down a city is a rational response and is not in itself equally violent and abusive.

      Are you one of those “some”?

      1. Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence … I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor…”

        -Nelson Mandela

        1. In worker’s paradise, we only need one quote posted on every wall of every building.

          “I want everyone to remember why they need us.”

          -High Chancellor Sutler

          If only we could actually achieve worker’s paradise where great men like him were able to rule again. Onward Comrades!!!!

        2. I guess you are one of the “some”. But I already knew that.

        3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necklacing#In_South_Africa

          ANC violence was so liberating and just.

          “Moloko said her sister was burned to death with a tire around her neck while attending the funeral of one of the youths. Her body had been scorched by fire and some broken pieces of glass had been inserted into her vagina, Moloko told the committee. Moloko added that a big rock had been thrown on her face after she had been killed.

          I bet all those black kids Winnie’s “Mandela United Football Club” goons burned alive in Soweto, really taught the whites a lesson.

          Anyway, Nelson Mandela later renounced violence, so your quote is moot.

        4. Is it bravery or cowardice to attack innocent people and their livelihoods that had nothing to do with any “dishonor”?

        5. “Where choice is set between cowardice and violence, I would advise violence … I prefer to use arms in defense of honor rather than remain the vile witness of dishonor…”

          What does that have to do with burning down poor neighborhoods and looting small businesses?

        6. And look what a shithole South Africa is now.

        7. Yes like bombing school children like this terrorist kaffir

    2. Jacobin’s just jealous the cops got there first.

    3. *Quoting a millennial version of The Militant*

      No articles in the People’s Daily, AmSoc?

  35. >>I was at this protest earlier today and it was one of the most peaceful gatherings I’ve ever been to: everyone was silent for over 30 mins!

    it’s like totally our Live Aid

  36. On the Brianna Taylor case – it is fairly obvious to put the focus on the police officers. After all, they are the trigger men. They fired the shots that killed her.

    But were they acting beyond their authority?

    Or were they carrying out the mission that they were ordered to do?

    In other words… who is actually to blame?

    From Taylor’s point of view… a bunch of men kicked in her door in the middle of the night, and when her boyfriend tried to stop them, they shot and killed her.

    That’s pretty horrific.

    But what of the officer who pulled the trigger?

    From his point of view, he was sent to serve a search warrant on a drug dealer. As he is trained to do, he and his team yelled “Police search warrant!” and then using the department issued battering ram, knocked the door in.

    Upon entering the residence, they found two suspects in a bedroom. One opened fire, hitting an officer. They returned fire, killing one of the suspects.

    So who is to blame? Certainly not Taylor. They tried to blame the boyfriend… but how is he supposed to know that the guys who just woke him from a deep sleep by kicking in his door are just police who are serving a search warrant? I can’t blame him for a perfectly reasonable response to a completely unreasonable situation.

    But what about the people who sent the police there? A judge signed off on the warrant. He also signed off on the use of this sort of swat-style tactic.

    Judges also approved the complete blurring of the distinction between “no knock” and “knock and announce”, with the latter only requiring an incoherent yelling and pounding, followed seconds later by a full breach attack. From inside the home, the distinction really is minuscule.

    So the judge is ultimately responsible, because he’s the check on this power.

    So is the guy who obtained the warrant on sketchy grounds….. maybe the package was worthy of a search. But someone beefed it up to make it into a “we have to kick the door in while everyone is asleep!” situation, instead of “let’s head over there at 1 pm and knock on the door in uniform and serve the warrant.”

    So that guy bears some responsibility.

    The last two people who bear responsibility are Taylor and her boyfriend.

    But the police who fired their weapons are not much farther up the list than they are.

    Their boss sent them there. Prosecutors probably reviewed the warrant. A judge definitely did. The police chief decided on what tactics to train his force to use, and decided on the policies for when to use them. The legislature dictated the war on drugs that necessitated the whole thing, and we elected them.

    Every one of the people in that chain of “doing the wrong thing” bears more responsibility than the officer who stands in a bedroom door and has a gun pointed at him. The ass-hat who put him in that doorway is to blame. Because he’s going to shoot at the guy pointing a gun at him – every single time.

    That is the take-home here. Not “throw the officer in jail”.

    Of course, nobody is going to find that satisfactory. Judges can’t be held accountable for that at all. There’s not even a mechanism for that. It is utterly impossible to hold a judge accountable in this scenario. Yet he’s the lynchpin. He’s the guy who has the responsibility of being the outside check and balance on the police power of the executive.

    And the war on drugs is even more responsible – because the entire interaction was a response to that. We do have a remedy for that. But nobody wants to use it. Hell, most people still support the war on drugs, so we keep electing people who support the war on drugs.

    Look, I realize I’m just pissing in the wind here. If you didn’t already know what I just wrote, you aren’t going to listen. You probably can’t even understand it. Not that it is complicated, or highly technical. It is just such a foreign concept to people who have not been on the civil liberty path and focused on the problem of police tactics and missions getting people killed. So foreign that they cannot even grasp it.

    If you are a “screw the police” libertarian or progressive, you are likely hostile to even considering that the officer in the doorway is not culpable for murder. So you won’t get it. You won’t see that if you were put in that same spot, you’d do the same thing. You’ll rationalize some reality where you wouldn’t fire your weapon at someone shooting at you when you are doing your lawful duty. So he’s evil. But he’s just a person.

    A person who shouldn’t have been put in that spot at that moment. The people responsible are the people who put him in that spot. And by misplacing the blame, we ensure that it will happen again. We avoid fixing the real problem, so we’ll keep putting guys like him in the wrong place at the wrong time. And more innocent people will be paying the price for our stupidity.

    1. Too much nuance. What do I burn?

      1. This guy gets it.

    2. Another great post, Cyto.

      I’d put blame on those in LE who prioritized evidence preservation over the lives of people in those dwellings being searched.

      I’d also say that, unless it’s the trigger man cop’s first search warrant service, he knows that he’s kicking in someone’s door at 1 AM. He knows that a lot of the time, they find nothing. (Go look at all of the warrants that asshole Goines asked for in Houston, where nothing at all was recovered.) He knows because he’s seen their faces, what it’s like for the people he’s raiding—and he still went into the office the next day and stayed on the warrant service team.

      The cop pulling the trigger doesn’t get a pass.

    3. Try and explain this detailed, reasoned nuance on Twitter and see how Lebron responds.

    4. love it. only exception:

      >>if you were put in that same spot, you’d do the same thing

      i would never be in the same spot.

    5. The officers still made the final decision to kick in the door, knowing damn well they were (as with all no-knock search warrants) putting people at risk, including themselves.

      While there is more than enough blame to go around, “just following orders” isn’t an excuse.

      1. Behind this door there are dangerous, armed drug dealers.

        The safest tactic is to catch them by surprise and control the situation before they can react and open fire. When you breach the door, you take command of the room. If there is a dog who is aggressive, do not try to control the dog. This will get you killed. Shoot the dog to eliminate the threat.

        This is their training.

        This is not a “Just following orders to do something immoral” situation. They are trained that this is the safest tactic, overall. This is bog standard for police around the country.

        Which is part of the problem. They’ve expanded the scope of what were supposed to be exceptionally rare tactics. But it isn’t the beat cop who is driving that progression. That comes from the top.

        Serving warrants is not inherently moral. In fact, if they are well-founded and duly approved, serving warrants is quite moral.

        You aren’t going to win the argument over tactics and mission at the level of the beat cop. Those decisions are made way above his head. His concerns are basically centered around safely executing his duties. His hands are where the screw-ups happen. But the solutions to those screw-ups are not at his level.

        1. Bullshit.

          Officers make a specific request for the type of warrant to be served, and have full autonomy in its execution. Nothing prevents them from using a lower level of force, indeed, using the lowest level of force possible is also a cornerstone of their training.

          Nor do I see any police organizations lobbying to end the practice, even with how many decades of evidence and a body count of innocents that there might be problems. Nor have officers declined to serve such warrants, as seen with police refusing to comply with arrest orders during the lockdown.

          How are those officers so able to defy orders from higher up, but these were not?

          And at a more basic level, the essence of law enforcement is personal responsibility. Play stupid games, win stupid prizes. That this should exclusively apply to the officer’s wards but not to himself is in part why the country is on fire right now.

          But certainly the officers are not to blame.

          1. The guy going through the door is probably not the guy requesting the warrant. Detectives don’t usually lead the way on a breach. I don’t remember the details on who all the players were on this on…

            But you are making the same point I am essentially….. requesting that type of warrant is where this crime occurs, way before shots are fired. And the person who is supposed to make sure that this is only used in rare and appropriate circumstances is the judge.

            So that’s where the real fault lies. A person was murdered… but not at the moment the gun was fired. It was the entire process of assaulting their home and creating an inherently violent situation that was the injustice resulting in death. Not “some racist cop shot her”.

            1. So if he’s the detective who wrote up that crap warrant, then he’s got full measure of fault.

      2. The Nuremberg defense is okay for everyone except Nazis.

    6. What about the decision not to wear police uniforms? Was that part of the warrant? Were they ordered not to wear uniforms?

      1. Again… tactics.

        Not his decision.

        And I don’t understand that one at all. But it does seem to be almost universal these days. You wear some form of paramilitary garb. Because that’s cool! Or maybe a windbreaker with “Police” on the back. Because that’s how the FBI does it on TV

        I don’t know if it began as “we want the SWAT unit to stand out as elite, separate from our uniformed officers”, or as a simple fashion preference.

        But your point is well taken. We’ve reduced the significance and prevalence of the uniform, and it has unquestionable gotten people shot. Some undercover work is inevitable.. but wearing a cool T-Shirt with a tactical vest and pocket pants is no way to ensure that people inside a home will know that there is not a home invasion under way.

        So this is another tactic that should be changed. From the top down.

    7. Fixing real problems is hard.
      Shallow bitching about whole classes of people is easy.
      Progress uber alles

    8. So Cyto is Harsayani’s screen name?

  37. The unemployment rate unexpectedly dropped in May, and that is a good thing.

    Employers hired 2.5 million people back, and that is a good thing.

    1. Which is why you don’t see it in the morning roundup.

    2. If we get back to 10% UE by August, I’ll gladly eat my words.

      1. At the rate of 2.5 million per month… we’ll have added all the jobs lost back in a year.

        Yeesh…..

    3. It is a good thing.

    4. This would seem to undermine the argument for Pelosi’s stimulus (meant to bail out the states) and the bolster the Republican argument against it.

      Some 500,000 state and municipal workers have lost their jobs over the past ten weeks, which is what it looks like when the government gets smaller.

  38. What about Duncan Lemp who was also killed in his bed during a no knock raid? Oh that’s right he’s a privileged white guy so no one gives a shit.

  39. Rasmussen: Black Approval For Trump Surges to Over 40%

    Confounding media’s effort to blame him for riots.

    1. Keep in mind those are the 10-15% of people who are “bad”, and also, they aren’t really black.

      /this message approved by Joe Blither Biden

    2. “Approval” may not translate into votes. It may mean “too bad he’s not a Democrat, if he were I’d vote for him in a minute.”

  40. Since the beginning of the year, 68 people have been murdered in Washington, D.C. Per the news stories relating the murders, almost all the victims and identified perpetrators have been black.

    When can we expect the marchers in S.E. D.C. protesting this loss of life?

    1. Pikers! In Chicago 82 murdered in the Merry month of May alone.

    2. I know, I know it’s an article from The Atlantic, but it directly addresses the essence, if not the specific city, of your question:

      https://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2012/04/why-dont-black-people-protest-black-on-black-violence/255329/

      TLDR: There are marches against black-on-black violence. Maybe not in Washington, D.C.

      1. TLDR: There’s more money in getting white liberals riled up about white-on-black violence than black-on-white or black-on-black violence.

  41. Let’s examine the factors that led to the death of David McAtee.

    1) There was a 9 PM curfew.

    2) Some people were ignoring the 9 PM curfew and hanging out at his restaurant as it grew close to midnight.

    3) Police enforced the curfew by firing pepper balls to force the crowd to disperse (keep in mind it’s apparently a nonviolent crowd of people socializing).

    4) McAtee steps outside, holding a gun, to see what’s going on. He definitely pointed his gun at cops who were about 15 yards away. Surveillance video and bystander reports agree that he opened fire on the cops.

    5) Police return fire on him.

    Anyone want to discuss this rationally? There’s a lot more issues at play here than the specific actions of the cops on the scene.

    1. I should amend point 4. He “appears” to fire based on available surveillance video. Bystanders did claim that he did. However, there’s no body-cam footage, and the surveillance video is fairly limited. Here’s a link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmA31VwxeIY

  42. https://www.vox.com/2020/6/5/21281604/lafayette-square-white-house-tear-gas-protest

    “I’m not saying it’s not a tear gas, but I’m just saying we use a pepper ball that shoots a powder.”

    1. Oh, so we’re back to the “I lied but was accurate” game.

      Kinda like how everyone blatantly lied about what Trump said today about George Floyd.

  43. i’m trying to understand the justification for a no knock warrant at any time. i can’t even consider a situation where there could be an imminent threat making the inability for people to even know the armed men storming their house are cops justifiable. any amount of drugs they can flush before they answer the door would be small, so this is just another bad idea that comes to us from the drug war.

  44. While I absolutely think no knock warrants should be abolished, at the same time, if the cops were so blood thirsty, why didn’t they kill both of them, like in the Texas case? That the boyfriend survived is pretty amazing, actually.

  45. “Black women created this call to action because we continue to wrongly talk about the generations-long crisis of police and vigilante violence in a gendered way, as if it only happens to Black men,”
    It mostly happens to white men, so yeah the narrative is very biased. Men are overrepresented by over 16 to 1. Amoung women only Native American women are killed at a rate close to white men.

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