James Comey

Report: James Comey Broke FBI Rules by Leaking Trump Memos, but He Didn't Reveal Classified Info to the Press

Partisans, to your battle stations!

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Former FBI Director James Comey broke FBI rules and improperly shared classified information with his attorneys in his efforts to keep track of—and alert the public about—President Donald Trump's alleged attempts to influence the investigations against his administration. But Comey did not leak classified information to the media.

Those are the conclusions of a report released today by the Department of Justice Office of Inspector General (OIG), which is the department's independent watchdog.

Comey believed that Trump's attempts to discourage the investigation of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn were inappropriate, and he kept a series of memos documenting his encounters and conversations with the president. When Trump fired Comey in May 2017, the ex-FBI director kept the memos believing they were his own personal recollections and not the property of the FBI. He also arranged for some of the contents to be passed along to the press.

A massive media blitz followed, with Comey's observations playing an influential role in the debate over whether Trump's actions were worthy of impeachment. The OIG has determined that some of Comey's behavior here was improper.

To summarize the 83-page report:

  • The eight memos that Comey wrote about his interactions with Trump were FBI records, not personal recollections, as Comey claimed. The OIG notes that the statutory definition of FBI records includes any "creating and recording information by agency personnel in the course of their official duties, regardless of the method(s) or the medium involved."
  • Comey violated FBI policies in how he handled these memos and by keeping four of them locked in a safe at home after he had been fired. Under Comey's employment agreement with the FBI, those memos should have been returned.
  • He improperly disclosed the contents of a memo by asking his lawyer to share it with a New York Times reporter without authorization, thus making public some sensitive details of an ongoing investigation. He reportedly did so for the expressed purpose of forcing the Justice Department to appoint a special counsel to investigate Trump's campaign (Robert Mueller was appointed to do so two weeks after Comey was fired).
  • Comey improperly disclosed the contents of the four memos he had brought home with him by sharing them with his attorneys without FBI authorization. He also failed to tell the FBI he had shared the memos with his attorneys, even after the FBI reviewed the memos and determined that one of them contained a small amount of classified information pertaining to Flynn's interactions with representatives of other countries.
  • Though Comey handled these memos improperly and disclosed the contents without FBI authorization, the OIG did not find any evidence that Comey or his lawyers shared any classified information with media.

In the end, the OIG concludes that:

In a country built on the rule of law, it is of utmost importance that all FBI employees adhere to Department and FBI policies, particularly when confronted by what appear to be extraordinary circumstances or compelling personal convictions. Comey had several other lawful options available to him to advocate for the appointment of a Special Counsel, which he told us was his goal in making the disclosure. What was not permitted was the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive investigative information, obtained during the course of FBI employment, in order to achieve a personally desired outcome.

While the report is very critical of Comey, the former FBI director believes he has been vindicated:

Trump insisted that Comey leaked classified information to the press, but it is now clear that the OIG found no evidence to support that allegation. Trump is unlikely to apologize, just as Comey defenders are unlikely to walk back their support based on his actual missteps. Jennifer Rubin of The Washington Post has already dismissed the problems the OIG did find as procedural complaints.

As an unabashed supporter of government whistleblowers and leakers, I am glad Comey leaked his own memos. He was a lousy FBI director who seems to have convinced himself that he's a hero, but I believe we have a right to know about and judge both his behavior and Trump's.

That Comey insists he's been vindicated and remained a free man throughout this entire affair should serve as a reminder that other whistleblowers much lower in the federal food chain—like Reality Winner (who exposed a report showing Russia's attempts to hack into American voting systems) and Daniel Everette Hale (who exposed serious flaws with the CIA's drone assassinations overseas)—received much different treatment. Winner is in prison and Hale has been arrested and charged.

If Comey's looking for another way to stay relevant now that he's been somewhat absolved, he should consider helping his fellow whistleblowers.

Read the OIG report for yourself here.

UPDATED: Trump tweets his opinion of the report:

NEXT: Free Speech Defenders Warn Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez That She Is Violating the Constitution by Blocking Critics on Twitter

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  1. Partisans, to your battle stations!

    I realize the comments generate clicks and ad revenue, but you’re being a little too obvious with a headline like this.

    1. It’s pretty much a “both sides.” AKA Reason’s version of a genuflection when a Trump opponent looks bad.

      1. I love this complaint of “both sides,” as if one side was less shitty than the other. Hint: if you think that, you are swimming in shit.

        1. Remember everyone. Chipper is the only true and honest person in america and he never chooses sides, except when he is calling everyone he disagrees with a tribalist.

          1. Why do you guys call me “Chipper”? It’s an adjective and a modifier for “Wood.” Would you call Fist “Ettiquete,” or Rufus “Monocled”? Should I call you “Az”? Do you even English, broheim?

            1. No one fucking cares, Chipper.

              1. “Eunuch” is the proper nomenclature.
                And if you don’t get it, just read his posts

            2. Not only does your rant make no logical sense, it is fucking retarded.

              Your proffered argument would have almost made non retarded since if I had called you wood.

              Chip, if you were not retarded, is a name. And if you were a fan of black and white television you would here the nickname chipper on a few shows such as my 3 sons.

              So how about logical responses next time instead of sqrsly like ranting?

            3. Chipper Morning Wood = cheerful hard-on. Sounds about right.

              1. Chipper morning wood = “I stuck my dick in a wood chipper because I woke up and realized it’s useless”
                Hence eunuch

            4. Chipper yourself, wood

            5. Settle down Chipper.

        2. No, you don’t love the complaint. You love avoiding the rather obvious fact that Reason resorts to ‘partisanship’ as a method of avoiding noting that Comey – a Federal official with immense power – was found to be grossly abusing his position of authority.

          They’d be more animated had he shot someone’s dog. But Orange man bad. You know it and I know it.

          1. The analysis at Lawfare seems better than yours.

            I blame the education and experience of the Lawfare author.

            1. You mean, Comey’s good friend, who has repeatedly been caught lying about Comey’s behavior and covering up his criminal behavior?

              That kind of experience? You’ve got it, too!

          2. You say:
            “Comey – a Federal official with immense power – was found to be grossly abusing his position of authority.”

            As did a litany of higher-ups at Obummy’s DOJ, FBI, CIA, NSA, IRS, FISA Court, etc…In regards to Trump & 2016 election, they tried to insure that Da Witch would win & when she did not, they tried to foment a coup of a duly elected Prez…One of the most horrible, illegal & evil things that has ever happened in America, but alas, all will skate away!

    2. Leo, I like to listen to The Partisan by Leonard Cohen when getting ready to do battle in the comments. You?

      1. REM – Shiny, Happy, People

      2. You don’t battle, eunuch.
        You try really, really, really hard to virtue signal to the progs in the hopes that someone will approve of you, shit up the thread with shallow, idiotic observations, and lame ass attempts at jokes.
        But hey, at least you found psychoticjeff, echo, and sqrlsy so you can have a “Squad” like AOC+3.
        Progress, eh?

    3. Partisans, to your battle stations!

      But not Scott Shackford, he’s Temperate and Impartial! Both sides everyone, both sides…

    4. Its just another way of saying Conservatives Pounce

    5. Of course, to Shackford an attempted coup of a duly elected Libertarian-ish Trump is not something every American should be upset about.

    6. Well, the headline is accurate. Comey did violate policies and did leak confidential information by showing it to his lawyers. However, he did not leak the confidential information to the press.

      I would mostly say Trump won on this one. Comey did leak privileged information, even if it wasn’t confidential. Trump isn’t an expert on public secrecy levels and requirements. Comey IS, and he deliberately violated them.

      As we now know the basis of the investigation (Russia Russia Russia) was nonsense, that further supports Trumps early attempts at stopping the government from wasting time investigating it.

      I can understand Comey’s actions as potentially thinking he was doing the right thing. However, I cannot condone him lying about it the way he has. The “necessity” affirmative defense requires outright declaration of what you did and why your did it.

      1. Let us not forget that the worst thing he ever did was not recommend that the DOJ indict Clinton for turning the State Dept. into the Clinton Foundation State Dept, lying about it & then trying to destroy all the evidence & then doing nothing when Clinton’s staff (Mills, Abedin, et al.) obstructed justice & then doing nothing when Abedin was found to have over 100,000 State Dept. e-mails on her personal laptop several months after she was no longer working there and that her sex-pervert hubby was looking at in their home!

      2. Why is the article, as well as posts above minimizing the crime of illegally releasing classified information? Who cares that it wasn’t the press, but someone else? He committed a serious crime by releasing that classified information. Why do they call it a “leak” when done by a politician (yes, he’s a politician, not a lawman).

  2. “That Comey insists he’s been vindicated and remained a free man throughout this entire affair should serve as a reminder that other whistleblowers much lower in the federal food chain—like Reality Winner (who exposed a report showing Russia’s attempts to hack into American voting systems) and Daniel Everette Hale (who exposed serious flaws with the CIA’s drone assassinations overseas)—received much different treatment. Winner is in prison and Hale has been arrested and charged.”

    What? How dare you mention Comey in the same breath as these traitors? Don’t you know he’s special?

  3. Totally exonerated.

    1. But enough about Aziz Ansari.

  4. I don’t need a public apology from those who defamed me, but a quick message with a “sorry we lied about you” would be nice.

    For some reason, I read that in Donald Trump’s voice.

  5. if Comey spoke to Clapper he spoke to the media

    >>the ex-FBI director kept the memos believing they were his own personal recollections and not the property of the FBI

    no way in this universe this was true.

    1. At an earlier time, Comey testified that he did not consider telling someone else to tell things to the media to be leaking. So, by his definitions, he told the truth. Remember, it’s not a lie if you believe it!

      Also, notice, the limited set of people and information he is claiming exoneration on.

    2. “It’s not a lie if you believe it”

      -Costanza

      1. That’s actually a legal principle. You cannot be prosecuted for perjury if you believe it in good faith.

        This is why there are a lot of laws that include “knew or should have known” and other words so people can’t abuse that.

    3. They’re deliberately buying into his excuse for the crime. Comey isn’t enough of an idiot to have actually believed this.

  6. I also have some issues with the fact that the judge says that Comey’s interactions with Trump, his own memos documenting the President’s activity on a non-classified matter, should be FBI property.

    Does the government work for us, or do we work for it?

    1. I don’t think there’s any doubt that Comey worked for the government at the time he wrote the memos.

    2. That principle cuts both ways – memos from a govt employee, generated during his (or, hypothetically, her) employment, about his activities as a government employee, sound like government property to me, in the sense of public documents which unless public release is forbidden by law, the public should have access to.

      1. You are absolutely correct, it wasn’t a “personal” memo, it was government business and as such it was covered under the Federal Records Act and was property of the government. The FRA was enacted to make government business transparent to the public.

    3. I think a joint custody agreement is in order. Comey gets the memos on weekends under court supervision.

    4. It was interactions involving government business, not personal interactions. By definition it is government property and also under the purview of executive privilege which is determined by the president, not comey.

    5. Documents written on government owned computers, during government hours, about government business, should be privately owned?

      Really?

    6. He met with Trump as Director, not as Trump’s best buddy after a round of golf. Hence, any products of said meeting were obtained under official capacity. Pretty simple.

  7. If you improperly disclose classified information, it doesn’t matter who you exposed it to; you broke the law.

    Well, unless you are an Untouchable. Then it’s totes cool.

    1. “you broke the law”

      Yes but it’s okay cause he hates Donald Trump… resistance or something something…
      It’s not wrong if the president is unpopular with the clerisy, because that’s racist.

  8. That cell phone behind Comey’s head is positioned in such a way that at first I thought he had a ponytail. I thought he’d let himself go since leaving the FBI.

    1. The only ponytail you will catch Comey with will be coming out of his butt.

      1. NTTIAWWT

  9. Partisans, to your battle stations!

    Remember the the Reason article where it claimed that Mueller’s testimony merely confirmed what both sides wanted to hear?

    1. Actually, loathing Comey is something both sides should agree on, because whoever he screws his shtick is always the same. James Comey, in three steps :

      (1) He is not an exceptionally corrupt or duplicitous politico, but just normally so. Left to his own devices he might well be a smidgen more ethical than the typical Washington denizen, but he also covers his rear end and looks for the main chance.

      (2) However he thinks himself the most gloriously righteous individual God was ever blessed to grant life to. I’m absolutely certain he smugly admires the righteous look of his righteous appearance while lovingly spending long hours in front of the mirror.

      (3) Therefore when he acts like a scummy politician he acts more scummy than usual, since his glorious perfection means his sordid motives aren’t his motives at all. They can’t be !!! Someone “less ethical” than he would probably act more ethical out of sheer embarrassment alone. Not a factor with Comey.

      Of course, 28 Oct 2016 is the prime example, when Comey ignored every single guideline / regulation on late interference with elections for the most tenuous of reasons. He knew his NY field office was filled with Trump supporters and leaking like a sieve. He wanted to position the FBI for the minimum political criticism. So he broke every rule and threw a presidential election to a reality-TV-show buffoon. Then convinced himself he was gloriously righteous doing so. That’s Comey……

      1. “…So he broke every rule and threw a presidential election to a reality-TV-show buffoon. Then convinced himself he was gloriously righteous doing so. That’s Comey……”

        You and she lost, loser. Grow up.

        1. Understanding compound arguments is probably difficult for you. Maybe it’ll help you if we break it down :

          (1) Did Comey break every Justice Department rule about against disrupting elections? Without question. There is a Justice Department policy against disclosing information about investigations close to an election which Comey knowingly ignored.

          (2) Was Comey’s disruption critical to Donald Trump’s election? Without question. DJT is president thanks to 80,000 people in three states. It’s impossible to believe the ultimate October Surprise didn’t have an effect much larger than that. The pollster who gave Trump the strongest odds of winning, Nate Silver of 538, says his analysis strongly suggests Comey’s announcement swung the election.

          (3) Does Comey still insist his actions were right, regardless of rules or consequences? Without question. Oh, he’s done some preening regret, but you’d expect that. Comey said it’s “mildly nauseous to think we might have had some impact on the election” (love that “we”), but that was just his typical posturing. The man’s self-regard is far too impregnable for an honest accounting or regret.

          (4) Is Donald John Trump a reality-TV-show buffoon?

          Jesus. Just follow his flailing clown-show on any random week and that’s clear. There’s absolutely zero question about that….

          1. Hillary didn’t go to the White House, but apparently she isn’t going to prison, either, like a prole would. So it all evens out in the end.

          2. Comey interfered with the election when he, improperly announced that HiLIARy wouldn’t be prosecuted, despite the obvious violations of multiple laws and government regulations.
            The October re-opening wasn’t disclosed to the public by Comey. He notified Congress, as he had said he would, if new evidence surfaced. Congress is where the announcement came from.
            No one can know how the Congressional revelation of the re-opening effected voting.
            Regardless of having been a reality TV star, Trump’s done a far better job for the country than the last resident of the WH.

          3. “Understanding compound arguments is probably difficult for you.”

            Your intellect is unimpressive. Certainly inferior to most of the people here who happen to support Trump. Mostly, you’re just arrogant. Which is typical of most progressives. You see yourselves as above it all. This attitude is conducive towards favoring socialist candidates and a socialist system. As you do not see yourself living under the rules you advocate for the masses.

            You even manage to look down on someone like Trump, who would scrape you off his shoe. His accomplishments are far beyond anything your limited mind can imagine. This angers you, amd triggers your superiority complex. So you twist facts around to make Trump look like some unaccomplished clown, while supporting weak minded buffoons who truly failed upwards. Or outright political mafioso, like the Clintons.

            I consider an induhvidual, such as yourself, to be an object of scorn and annoyance. Your rantings about Trump are tiresome, and really just detract from a rational discussion of his relative successes and failures.

  10. I don’t think our dear former FBI Director Comey is quite out of the woods yet. There are several more investigative efforts that involve him. We’ll see. If he broke no law, then that is fine. I am personally glad that would be the case, because you sort of want to be able to trust the ‘honorable-ness’ of our government employees.

    My question (to the lawyers out there): If he violated his employment contract repeatedly, as the IG documented, is Comey’s federal pension now on the table?

    1. It doesn’t matter, he’ll get a lucrative gig as an MSNBC or CNN ‘contributor’. They take care of their own.

      1. He already got the standard publishing contract payout for democrats in government.

      2. If a Trump press secretary can find gainful employment, anyone can……

    2. If he fraudulently signed off on FISA warrants he knew were bullshit (it sure looks like he did) perjury charges are in his future. Unlike this activity it won’t be so easy tap dancing around the scummy ethics he possesses.

    3. He should be prosecuted. Let the legal system play out. And if necessary, move the trial out of DC.

  11. …the ex-FBI director kept the memos believing they were his own personal recollections and not the property of the FBI.

    If one of the top feds can’t keep the Byzantine rules of his own obligation straight, how can anyone?

    1. believing they were his own personal recollections

      Translation: “telling himself that if his conduct is ever challenged, his story will be that he believed the memos were his own personal recollections.”

  12. “Trump insisted that Comey leaked classified information to the press, but it is now clear that the OIG found no evidence to support that allegation.”

    Well, they didn’t find any evidence that he didn’t leak them to the press, either. That’s the standard now, right, Mr. Mueller?

    1. If you read the report, he didnt leak to the press. He did however give the classified memos to his lawyer who had no clearance and failed to report the disclosure to agents who sought to take command of the classified memo from his house.

    2. And he did leak to the press. Just not memo 2 which was classified.

    3. Didn’t he testify he leaked them to a friend and had that friend leak them to a specific reporter?

      I don’t see how that is any different than him doing so himself directly.

      1. Comey is parsing on the word classified which was only memo 2. That memo wasnt given to the press, but it was discussed with the NYT prior to trump talking about tape recordings of him and comey.

  13. “no evidence that Comey or his attorneys released any of the classified information contained in any of the memos to members of the media”

    Uh, didn’t he give that classified info to his professor buddy with instructions to share it with the media?

    Please someone clarify.

    1. Ok, according to the OIG report, Comey wrongly disclosed classified info to his attorneys (memo 2). He wrongly disclosed FBI info to the media but not “classified” (memo 4). He grossly mishandled all of the above. He unconstitutionally violated civil liberties by disclosing such information which the FBI gleaned with its surveillance powers. And he did it all for his personal political purposes. That’s according to the OIG.

      Of course, Comey’s handling of this information is just the tip of the iceberg with respect to his wrongdoing in the Russia fiasco. This doesn’t touch the spying on Trump. And throughout all of this Comey has sanctimoniously lied his rear end off.

      1. By clinger standards, Mr. Comey was totally exonerated.

        Carry on, clingers. Whining and ankle-nipping are free.

        1. Actually, unlike a drooling moron, such as yourself, the standard we use in this case is federal law, as written.

          I’m sure that confuses and befuddles a ranting, raving faggot like you.

  14. “James Comey Broke FBI Rules by Leaking Trump Memos, but He Didn’t Reveal Classified Info to the Press.”

    …and if you believe that one, Shackford will tell you another one.

  15. Isn’t it illegal to release information about investigations classified or not?

    1. Not illegal but against all DoJ rules and regulations.

    2. From what I can tell, he committed fireable offenses, and he could be held civilly liable. I do not believe that it is a criminal offense, though.

      1. Releasing the classified information to his attorney was a criminal offense.

  16. “As an unabashed supporter of government whistleblowers and leakers, I am glad Comey leaked his own memos.”

    Scott Shackford

    Hey Scott Shackford, did you mean to say that you are an unabashed supporter of the federal government spying on all Americans, and using that information as they see fit? This isn’t a situation where someone blew the whistle on the government. This is a situation where the government “blew the whistle” on a private citizen they were spying on. And on top of that, the government knew it was all a big “salacious and unverified” lie & hoax they were perpetrating. So Scott Shackford are you dishonest or just stupid?

    1. Clearly, Scott Shackford is a pen name for…James Comey.

  17. “As an unabashed supporter of government whistleblowers and leakers, I am glad Comey leaked his own memos.”

    So, should the FBI spy on, say, YOU…should they leak everything they got on you to the press…for transparency?

    1. Its hard to consider anyone coning up with a dumber take.
      “Big Brother should disclose everything it has on Winston Smith”

  18. who seems to have convinced himself that he’s a hero

    Welcome to Washington, DC. Or hell, any government anywhere, really.

  19. “As a result, Comey not only disclosed sensitive law enforcement information to his personal counsel but also a small amount of information contained in Memo 2 that the FBI subsequently determined was classified at the “CONFIDENTIAL” level.” p.58

    Just because the media did not print the specific words of the memos that were classified, does not in any way exonerate Comey for leaking classified material, that he possessed illegally, to his personal lawyers, for the purpose of leaking to the media.

  20. Why are federal policies regulating federal employees not law? Nevermind.

  21. “In a country built on the rule of law, it is of utmost importance that all FBI employees adhere to Department and FBI policies”

    You mean keep ex-employees of the FBI from telling the people that sign their paychecks how much of a shitbag Drumpf really is!

  22. Isn’t it interesting that so many commenters on this site overlook the President’s blatant and corrupt illegal acts underlying Comey’s situation to instead complain that, in passing along his own personal recollections, he technically violated the policies of the former employer that fired him. Nobody can pull the wool over your conservative/libertarian eyes better than yourselves.

    1. How the clingers wish to spend the time they have remaining before replacement is their business.

      1. Goddamn, is that really all you’ve got? It lost any impact it might ever have had about the 2,346th you said that. And it didn’t get any more impressive the next 5,000 times.

        You’re just a silly bitch.

    2. “Isn’t it interesting that so many commenters on this site overlook the President’s blatant and corrupt illegal acts underlying Comey’s situation”

      What’s truly interesting are the TDS victims who keep showing up with wild accusations…
      And not one bit of evidence.
      You lost, loser. Get over it.

  23. For those who fail to follow links

    VI. Conclusion

    Congress has provided the FBI with substantial powers and authorities to gather evidence as part of the FBI’s criminal and counterintelligence mission. The FBI uses these authorities every day in its many investigations into allegations of drug trafficking, terrorism, fraud, organized crime, public corruption, espionage, and a host of other threats to national security and public safety. In the process, the FBI lawfully gains access to a significant amount of sensitive information about individuals, many of whom have not been charged, may never be charged, or may not even be a subject of the investigation. For this reason, the civil liberties of every individual who may fall within the scope of the FBI’s investigative authorities depend on the FBI’s ability to protect sensitive information from unauthorized disclosure.

    As Comey himself explained in his March 20, 2017 testimony before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, he was unable to provide details about the nature or scope of the FBI’s ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election because

    “the FBI is very careful in how we handle information about our cases and about the people we are investigating…. Our ability to share details with the Congress and the American people is limited when those investigations are still open, which I hope makes sense. We need to protect people’s privacy…. We just cannot do our work well or fairly if we start talking about it while we’re doing it.”

    However, after his removal as FBI Director two months later, Comey provided a copy of Memo 4, which Comey had kept without authorization, to Richman with instructions to share the contents with a reporter for The New York Times. Memo 4 included information that was related to both the FBI’s ongoing investigation of Flynn and, by Comey’s own account, information that he believed and alleged constituted evidence of an attempt to obstruct the ongoing Flynn investigation; later that same day, The New York Times published an article about Memo 4 entitled, “Comey Memo Says Trump Asked Him to End Flynn Investigation.”

    The responsibility to protect sensitive law enforcement information falls in large part to the employees of the FBI who have access to it through their daily duties. On occasion, some of these employees may disagree with decisions by prosecutors, judges, or higher ranking FBI and Department officials about the actions to take or not take in criminal and counterintelligence matters. They may even, in some situations, distrust the legitimacy of those supervisory, prosecutorial, or judicial decisions. But even when these employees believe that their most strongly-held personal convictions might be served by an unauthorized disclosure, the FBI depends on them not to disclose sensitive information.

    Former Director Comey failed to live up to this responsibility. By not safeguarding sensitive information obtained during the course of his FBI employment, and by using it to create public pressure for official action, Comey set a dangerous example for the over 35,000 current FBI employees–and the many thousands more former FBI employees–who similarly have access to or knowledge of non-public information. Comey said he was compelled to take these actions “if I love this country…and I love the Department of Justice, and I love the FBI.” However, were current or former FBI employees to follow the former Director’s example and disclose sensitive information in service of their own strongly held personal convictions, the FBI would be unable to dispatch its law enforcement duties properly, as Comey himself noted in his March 20, 2017 congressional testimony. Comey expressed a similar concern to President Trump, according to Memo 4, in discussing leaks of FBI information, telling Trump that the FBI’s ability to conduct its work is compromised “if people run around telling the press what we do.” This is no doubt part of the reason why Comey’s closest advisors used the words “surprised,” “stunned,” “shocked,” and “disappointment” to describe their reactions to learning what Comey had done.

    We have previously faulted Comey for acting unilaterally and inconsistent with Department policy.103 Comey’s unauthorized disclosure of sensitive law enforcement information about the Flynn investigation merits similar criticism. In a country built on the rule of law, it is of utmost importance that all FBI employees adhere to Department and FBI policies, particularly when confronted by what appear to be extraordinary circumstances or compelling personal convictions. Comey had several other lawful options available to him to advocate for the appointment of a Special Counsel, which he told us was his goal in making the disclosure. What was not permitted was the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive investigative information, obtained during the course of FBI employment, in order to achieve a personally desired outcome.

    The OIG has provided this report to the FBI and to the Department of Justice Office of Professional Responsibility for action they deem appropriate.

  24. Well, after the FBI freaked out about the leaked Comey docs, what choice did they have than to say other than the docs were not sensitive.

    Similarly the Trump dossier was so secret that Obama and his closest advisors decided not to give the dossier to the president elect – rather Comey verbally briefed Trump on only 1 part of the dossier (the prostitute golden showers. A few days later Buzzfeed, after receiving the dossier from McCain’s aide, published the entire dossier on the internet, I guess that is where Trump got a copy along with the rest of the world. Suddenly, the super sensitive nature of the dossier was deemed not so sensitive after all. Otherwise, Buzzfeed and McCains aide might have been arrested for intefering in an ongoing FBI investigation by leaking the secret documents that were key to the investigation.

  25. Comey is a smug, self-satisfied, Top Cop. That said, I’m not sure about the whole memo thing. I mean, the law says that everything he generated wss government property. Doesn’t the douchbag have the right to take personal notes? What if wrote it down at the end of the day in his diary?
    Huh, it’s weird. After all the… *waves hand*… I’m more concerned about this asshat’s right to make personal notes. Of course, none of this is new information, and most of us have ling ago made up our minds about this whole affair. Maybe that’s why I’m interested in that angle: it’s new (to me).

    1. He doesn’t if the security agreements he signed say he doesn’t. I have a number of friends and relatives who work in national intelligence, or related government contractors. All of them are restricted to some degree in these regards. If they don’t like it, then they need to eat new jobs.

  26. This is really just a story about the importance of the 2nd amendment.

    1. +100000

      1. Oh my god how small is your dick?

        Who are you gonna shoot? Really, who?

        1. Well Tony, according to you, I’m and unstoppable killing machine who is offing progtards at a steady pace. So you might want to keep things civil.

          I’m reality. I’m an absolute sweetheart. And contrary to your progtarded assertions, you can have hot cars, lots of guns, and still sport a big cock. You’re just mad that you’re stuck with soyboys.

  27. I think there should be more whistleblowing, not less – Dave Barry defined a leak as someone in the government telling the public what the government was doing.

    Whistleblowers (like Felt and Comey) don’t necessarily have the best motives, but if you waited for a pure federal employee to come forward and tell you what the government was doing, you’d wait till Doomsday.

    1. Just out of curiosity, did Comey ever investigate anyone else for whistleblowing?

      1. Comey was a whistleblower….lol. Are you this fucking stupid in real life or just the REASON comment section?

        1. Ahem…

          “Whistleblowers (like Felt and Comey) don’t necessarily have the best motives, but if you waited for a pure federal employee to come forward and tell you what the government was doing, you’d wait till Doomsday.”

          1. He wasn’t whistleblowing, he was gathering words and phrases from Trump for the purpose of repackaging them to set Trump up. The only “wrongdoing” by Trump was whatever Comey cronies and his could create.

    2. “I think there should be more whistleblowing, not less”

      I agree in principle. But in the case of the president, as elected head of the executive branch, trying to stop the executive branch from prosecuting someone for lying (who turns out the agents on the case didn’t think he lied) as part of the coup against him, I don’t think whistle blower applies here.

      1. If the “misconduct” he exposed wasn’t even misconduct, that’s news too.

    3. Comey, a whistleblower?

      Tell me, what criminal activity was the government hiding that Comey revealed? How did he first attempt to resolve or report these crimes through the legal channels before going to the media?

      Oh, wait. The IG report addresses that exact issue! It says that Comey did not reveal any crimes, and he did not attempt to use legal channels either. So, in other words – Comey was not a whistleblower.

      1. Then call him a leaker, preferably leaking on your face.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnRMLb4onU0

  28. “in his efforts to keep track of—and alert the public about—”

    For @Reason to actually think the motive of Comey was to alert the public is absurd.

    I guess @Reason can excuse all such releases of non-sensitive information by public officials as just attempts to alert the public.

  29. Comey is a traitor to the Constitution.

    Comey was a co-conspirator in an attempted coup of a duly elected President and has allowed clear violations of the 1A, 2A, 4A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 8A…. to go un-investigated.

  30. A government official leaked information to the press. I am shocked. Simply shocked. I sure this never happen more that five or six times a day.

    What we should take from Comey and before him Clinton is that we have a very messed up system for handling information. Materials being “classified” is not objective but rather subjective and is typically in the eye of the beholder. So your enemies are leaking classified material while you are not when you give away similar material. To start with have far to much material classified and for the wrong reason. Something need to be held in secret, but it never OK for something that is personally embarrassing to be called classified. While I don’t hold much hope I would very much like to see less things classified and more stuff open to the public.

  31. The real lesson is that the Democrats need to clean house at every law enforcement and intelligence agency when they have control of the executive branch (or perhaps the legislature). That Democrats let Republicans control the FBI for decades, for example, is inexplicable.

    One silver lining to recent developments is that I doubt the Democrats will be so deferential in the future.

    1. You’re right! There should be some kind of party loyalty test to work at the DOJ. Not that anything would really change, given that 97% of DOJ employees who donated to a presidential candidate in 2016 donated to Hillary.

      https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/302817-government-workers-shun-trump-give-big-money-to-clinton-campaign

      Carry on, inbred retard.

  32. You’d think Trump would be grateful that the guy gave him the presidency. But no, Trump is a fucking insane person who can’t let any slight go unresponded to. Has any of you ever actually met anyone as insane as Trump? I haven’t. Not anywhere other than a gas station parking lot.

    1. You’d think Trump would be grateful that the guy gave him the presidency.

      How did he do that, you mendacious git? By running a private email server to hide from FOIA requests? By lying about and spouting some condescending “what, with a cloth?” bullshit after destroying evidence? By lying about his health? By rigging the Democratic primary? By heading a foundation that took money from foreign entities who had appeals pending with the State Department, which he also headed? By funneling money sub rosa from the DNC to his campaign? By screeching “why am I not up by 50 points” during a speech? By running campaign ads. that were 90% character assassination and only 10% policy-oriented? By refusing to hold press conferences for much of his campaign? By refusing to campaign in flyover states and instead trying to run up election numbers in lock-states such as California? By gaining a reputation as a cold, uncaring opportunist who would rifle through the office of his best friend while said best friend’s body was growing cold in a park? By being constantly associated with scandal (cattle futures, Whitewater, private healthcare working group, White House travel office, Craig Livingstone, CGI, etc. etc. et fucking c.)? By slandering the victims of Bill Clinton’s sexual assaults?

      Um, actually, Comey did none of those things. Her Hagness did. Tell me again how that evil woman could have won the presidency with all that baggage, Comey or not.

    2. On one of your good days you look five times as insane as Trump, Paul Krugman, with your creepy weirdo eyes looking around in every which direction, seemingly unable to focus on anyone or anything!

  33. Comey was exonerated of felonies because his *coup co-conspirators* judged the memos he leaked as confidential but not classified.
    #TooDeepStateToJail

    See VDH on Tucker.
    https://twitter.com/buybuydandavis/status/1167345029838360576

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