Food Freedom

The Beef Lobby's Losing Fight Against Plant-Based 'Meat'

Special interests want the government to protect them from competition.

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When you visit a grocery, literal-mindedness is a handicap. Apple butter is actually not a dairy product. Grape-Nuts cereal omits grapes as well as nuts. Corn dogs don't need leashes.

The U.S. Cattlemen's Association, however, is appalled that new forms of protein are being sold under names such as Beyond Beef and Impossible Burger. Vegetarian and vegan substitutes for meat have gained a significant share of the market, partly because of health considerations and partly because of aversion to killing harmless animals for food. But the livestock group fears that consumers are being cruelly misled.

It wants the Department of Agriculture to stop not only the use of these brand names but any term suggesting that there is such a thing as "synthetic beef" or "vegan meat."

It complains that Beyond Meat offers what it calls "a plant-based burger that smells, tastes, looks and even feels like ground beef"—and, if you can imagine, "strategically merchandises its products adjacent to traditional meat in grocery stores." Yet, it notes, these foods are composed entirely of "non-meat ingredients such as 'Pea Protein Isolate,' 'Rice Flour' and 'Yeast Extract.'"

About 8 million Americans are vegetarians, nearly half of whom are also vegans. To anyone who prefers to avoid foods harvested from livestock, it is a convenience to find these humane alternatives next to the original versions. That's why soy and almond milk are stored in the dairy case, where most of the products come from cows.

Some people who grew up drinking milk and eating burgers want to enjoy similar flavors that are derived solely from plants. The more closely the substitutes resemble animal products in taste, texture, and appearance, the likelier they are to sell. The cattlemen's organization, however, waxes indignant that "Beyond Meat's website shows that its burger patties are virtually indistinguishable when sold next to traditional ground beef."

This industry is not the first to try to stifle plant-based competition. Last year, Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin ("America's Dairyland") introduced a bipartisan bill titled the Defending Against Imitations and Replacements of Yogurt, Milk and Cheese to Promote Regular Intake of Dairy Everyday Act (acronym: DAIRY PRIDE). It would prevent makers of substitutes from using the term "milk." The supporters want the Food and Drug Administration to permit that label only for the "lacteal secretion" of a cow—yum!

The idea is that the government needs to intervene to prevent deception. Baldwin says that "imitations are marketed using the good name of dairy to sell their products." Actually, they use the bad name of dairy—its reliance on the relentless exploitation of sentient creatures—to sell their products.

The beef lobby deploys the same argument. Alternatives, it says, must "not be permitted to be labeled as 'beef,' which is widely understood by consumers to be the flesh of a bovine animal." A prohibition is needed "to eliminate the likelihood of confusion and to better inform consumers."
This is the sort of claim that is hard to make without laughing. Raise your hand if you have ever been at the customer service counter behind someone demanding a refund because his Vegan NOBEEF Strips contained no beef. What the beef and dairy producers want is for the government to protect them from competition.

People buy almond milk not because they think it contains cow's milk but because they know it doesn't. They order veggie burgers in the happy knowledge that no hooved beast was harmed to make them. If you go online in search of vegetarian or vegan foods, you will find such websites as "Fake Meats" and "The Vegetarian Butcher." They are not trying to fool anyone.

The beef and dairy producers have a bigger fear than imitations made from plants. The real long-term threat is milk and meat derived from animals—but grown from cells in a lab. That would allow humans to enjoy traditional foods without the need to feed, confine, kill, or clean up after cattle and other livestock.

"Clean meat" is not commercially viable just yet, but it's already being made. And the cattlemen's group wants the USDA to deny the term "beef" to anything not "harvested in the traditional manner"—that is, from slaughtered cows. Lab-grown seafood is also in the works.

The desires of consumers and the advance of science are converging in a way that is likely to remake our food system. The cattlemen can try to block this unwanted development. But they might as well try to milk a steer.

NEXT: Tocqueville on national injunctions

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  1. Can I say that I think I’m being milked of my dignity, freedom, and self-respect, by language micro-controlling power pigs of special interest groups? Or would that term “milked” cause me to run afowl of the Dairyman’s association? Since I gave no actual milk? Ooops, now I did it again, I pissed off chicken farmers by writing about running “afowl” of the dairy farmers!!! Even though I gave no actual chicken meat! But I DOOOO-DOOOO think it’s all a HUGE bunch of chicken shit!!!!

    1. Corn dogs need better shoes.

      Or a milk bath.

      1. Milk steak is the best!

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  2. One need only look at our teeth and digestive systems to realize our nutritional capacities. Human anatomy proves that people are omnivores. – Our odd brains, however, say eat whatever the hell you want (Just don’t try to eat me, or WE will have a problem!). – Seriously, research some of the things that are food, in OTHER countries.

    1. It is only the fabulous wealth in most of the West that makes this even an issue. In China and many other countries, they eat anything that moves without guilt or hesitation.

      1. The lady who cuts my hair if from China or Philippines or some such Asian shithole. She told me how when she was a girl she would eat snakes because it was the only thing she could find.

        1. True story: Shortly after marrying my Filipina wife, we were driving home one night and came across a very recently hit deer in the road. Still twitching, but clearly a goner. We stopped to examine it, and I was reaching into the trunk to grab a tire iron to brain it before tossing it in the trunk, when she said, “How pitiful!” and I quietly put the tire iron back.

          When I got to know her better I realized she’d have been fine with me killing it and bringing it home to eat.

          1. Deer liver is the most wonderful thing I have ever eaten.

          2. In Texas you’d go straight to jail for harvesting a dying deer. Lobbyists write the laws and looters enforce them.

        2. I think she was hitting on you. Clear cut sexual harassment.

          1. Some call it flirting.

            1. Dude. Woke up!

        3. You can’t use ‘shithole’ to describe those nations anymore, it’s being insensitive and demeaning. From hereon out, you shall refer to them as Turd-world Nations.

  3. People with some power and wealth always assume that anyone not like them is a rank idiot.

    So cattlemen think people buying veggie parties believe they are getting magical beef and dairy producers think the buyers of almond milk pay extra for the work that goes into squeezing the udders of small nuts. I believe they do think that!

    Why not? School officials think that when a kid chews a pop tart into a gun shape or makes a “gun” with fingers, other students think that is just as lethal as a real gun.

    And politicians think that when they spend more money from taxpayers and call it an “investment,” the public believes that it appreciates in value or provides income from returns because that’s what real investments do.

    1. I give it less than a generation before politicians swing from banning borf and malk to banning the real things.

    2. People with some power and wealth always assume that anyone not like them is a rank idiot.

      Now indicated by the magic of science.

      Control needs are basic and predict information-seeking in social relationships. Those without social power typically seek the most diagnostic information, making individuation more likely. Those who do have social power seek less diagnostic information about others and are vulnerable to stereotyping them. Moreover, feelings of control not only reflect individual power positions but also group power positions.

  4. Mooooooooooove over beef, there’s a new “meat” in town.

    Its made from plants but who cares what words mean when you are trying to take over the World.

    1. Today soy “milk”, morgen der weldt!!! Sieg Heil!!!

      1. Today soy “milk”, morgen der weldt!!! Sieg Heil!!!

        See, people say things like this to suggest that the deliberate alteration of words to mean things they do not mean will have no deleterious effects–why the idea is simply silly.

        But it was central to both 1984 and Animal Farm. It is a tried and true tactic of the left–as we sit here endless trying to ‘reclaim’ the term liberal, we should all know this.

        Soy plants don’t produce milk. No plants produce milk. But we have no trouble calling the highly industrially processed liquid that can be squeezed, fermented, ground, or chemically reacted out of them ‘milk’.

        By getting the term ‘milk’ applied, we hide the factories, the energy, and the pollution these processes generate. We hide that they are not natural in any way shape or form.

        We hide it so well that one can purchase ‘organic’ plant based ‘milks’

        This is the same thing being done with highly processed vegetable matter. It is not beef. It is not meat.

        Why is such a effort being put forth to expand those categories to include it? Why do the makers of processed vegetable pastes, slabs, mats and other industrial products want their products labeled as ‘meat’ so badly?

        Why is it so important for leftists to get us all to accept that authority arbitrarily decides what reality is?

        Why, indeed.

        1. Exactly. Always look to the motivation behind something and follow the money.

          What better way to control people than move them away from being able to grow their own multiple sources of food. When the left tries to ban beef, your choices for protein grow smaller.

        2. I agree to a certain extent, but terms like milk and meat have always meant more than their literal definition.

          The language abuse happens when terms like tolerance, equality, and justice and defined to mean their literal opposites. Tolerant people don’t tolerate intolerance. Equality-minded people are superior to anyone who disagrees with them. Social and economic justice are institutionalized injustice.

          Meat and milk? Meh.

        3. So… the FDA should control language so that leftists can’t? I’m not trying to be flippant, but I don’t really understand your argument. Why should any collective control language; shouldn’t it be up to individuals?

        4. Oh come on. Producers of soy milk are not trying to use the power of the state to rigidly define the meaning of the word milk. It is in fact the opposite. The defenders of the status quo here (both on the left and on the right) are using the power of the state to come up with rigid meanings of words that we all must accept lest we face the wrath of the state.

          It is morbidly amusing to see people who are so upset by “The Left” to see an instance where it’s actually the hippy-dippy vegan crowd, not exactly a bunch of right-wing zealots, that are challenging the authoritarian power of the state, and still people like Azathoth will rant against “the left”.

          1. Lefties try and change word meanings to suit their agendas.

            Same thing with trans people being biologically a man but the left demands that you call them a woman because that’s how they feel.

            Meat means something that has zero to do with plants.

            Veggieburger was a catchy name but clearly “catchy” is not good enough for the always insane lefties.

          2. I, for one, am not at all for using the power of the state to define “milk” or “meat”.

            I am very much for relentlessly mocking those who try to redefine these words until they cut that shit out.

          3. It is the left that is trying to dissociate concrete objects from their meanings.

            Not the right.

            Milk is any fluid we call ‘milk’.
            Meat is any substance we call ‘meat’
            Mayonnaise requires neither mayo nor naise.
            Men are women, women are men
            Colorblind means ‘racist’
            Freedom of speech is fascism
            War is Peace
            Freedom is Slavery
            Ignorance is Strength

            All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others.

        5. Anyone who’s so bad at reading clearly-marked labels that they buy soymilk instead of regular milk deserves the manboobs that they’re gonna end up with.

          And the labels are ALWAYS clearly marked. After all, the reason fake meat and dairy products exist is to feed people who don’t eat animal products, not to trick people who do.

          1. ^ Russian agent trying to trick Americans…again.

        6. Plants don’t produce milk? What about milkweeds? Monarch butterflies depend on them.

          /sarc

  5. I propose grabbing all the (meat-containing) hot dogs, corn dogs, and tofu pups in your local supermarket and dumping them in the parking lot.

    When they come to arrest you for shoplifting and vandalism, you smugly point to the decal on the front door that clearly says no dogs allowed inside, except for ones assisting the blind.

    1. That’s ruff.

    2. I’m howling with laughter

    3. That plan is all bark and no bite.

    4. I don’t really have a dog in this fight, but I would like to bring mine by the parking lot when you do this, to “chow down” on some free dog food, in this dog-eat-dog world!

    5. I catch your meaning.

  6. I’d personally be rather put out if I went to the meat aisle, picked out a package of ‘ground beef’, and when I got home discovered that I actually had purchased granulated soy protein.

    Rather like the time I picked up a package of “I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter” by mistake, and my pie crust came out like linoleum.

    So, I don’t mind if they use the word ‘beef’ somewhere on the package, but they’d better make sure the packaging makes it clear that the contents aren’t actually beef.

    Vat meat is a slightly different issue, as it really IS “meat”. The real concern here is that as soon as it’s even vaguely possible for people to afford vat meat, the SJW’s are going to mount a massive campaign to outlaw traditionally sourced meat. Aside from that threat, I’m actually interested in the opportunities it provides to make exotic and newly engineered meats available.

  7. Okay.
    So use the word nilk or n’milk. These words now means no-milk
    n’meat or neat for no-meat
    try nobeaf instead of nobeef.
    People learn new words everyday (I hope).

    All you smart people can come up with something better

    1. I call it crap.

      Blocks of soy are slabs of crap.
      Liquid soy is runny crap.

      1. Almondmilk is better than milk, but you keep the soymilk.

        You can keep everything made with soy.

        1. Isn’t almond milk magnitudes more expensive than most cow’s milk.

          Soy sauce is kewl.

        2. Whole (real) milk is the best milk. If you can’t do dairy, almondmilk or almond/coconut blend is an okay substitute.

          The Chinese place near me does a wicked General Tso’s tofu, but the chicken version is still better.

          1. Tofu is a distinct name for block of soy, so we all know what that is.

    2. I like yarmilk.

      And don’t forget to ask, “How is your p-dog.” (for plant dog).

  8. I love meat, and I love veggies. As I’ve gotten older I find I have less desire for meat with every meal, like I ate as a kid.

    I’ve never understood the reasoning behind fashioning veggie products into meat-like shapes or substitutes. ‘Burgers’ I can understand as the shape makes sense.

    Tofurkey? Vegan bacon (a heresy worth burning at the stake)? Non-dairy ‘cheese’? If you’re going veggie, go right ahead, but at least have the courage of convictions to do it entirely and stop pretending you’re eating meat.

    1. Bear in mind that some of this is intended to cater to folks with legitimate dietary restrictions.
      In the transition to what may be a severely restricted, or ‘merely’ radically different, diet every little bit helps.
      Add to that the fact that these dietary restrictions are often imposed late in life, when food preferences are pretty well set.
      That’s much of the initial rationale right there.

      [and people, do please note the qualifier ‘some’ above]

      1. folks with legitimate dietary restrictions

        I suspect these folks are pretty careful label readers so calling something Beef+ or NuBeef isn’t going to bother them.

        1. I’m lactose intolerant. I read ingredients. Otherwise I turn into Mr Stinky.

          1. You like dairy but dairy does not like you, ammirite?

            1. When dairy fights back

              1. Watch your bac…teria!

            2. I don’t like milk. I do like dairy as an ingredient in baked products, and I miss being able to eat Alfredo. I do have a weakness for cheese. And I pay for it on a regular basis. Or more accurately people in the same room with me pay for it.

              1. Is it just cow’s milk products or does goat and other mammal milk hit you hard?

                1. To be honest I don’t know. Goat products taste like ass in my opinion. Just the smell makes me retch. Haven’t tried milk from any other mammals. That’s a good question. I wonder what is available.

                  1. “”Goat products taste like ass in my opinion””

                    Are you sure you’re getting it from the right part of the goat?

                    1. Vic, I laughed big time on that one.

        2. True enough, but believe me, transitioning from just buying whatever catches your fancy to obsessively reading labels is non-trivial.
          I have no truck with those who oppose high fructose corn syrup for irrational social reasons, but I’ve benefited from ‘No HFCS’ labeling. It at least reduces the search space. Until you start obsessing over labels, you have no idea how much food has HFCs and/or flour.
          If you want to experience gustatory horror, take a look at the ‘low FODMAPS’ diet.
          It all but solved my IBS issues, but it’s not made eating fun. Lost 35 pounds, but at the cost of any notion of eating for pleasure.
          [shorter low fodmaps diet ? if Shirley likes it, it’s forbidden]

          1. Makes sense to cut out fermentable foods.

            As I tell people who change their eating habits for diets or health reasons, its a lifestyle change.

            It sucks if you love fried foods and have to cut them out almost entirely for whatever reason. Its hard to change something that you like after decades of doing it.

    2. If you’re going veggie, go right ahead, but at least have the courage of convictions to do it entirely and stop pretending you’re eating meat.

      This is what always mystifies me. If you’re going to be a vegetarian or a vegan then you know you’re going to be evangelical about it and constantly piss off everyone around you by not shutting up about it. So why the need to make your vegetables look and, hypothetically, taste like meat?

      The words on the wrapper are only going to fool dumb people who don’t bother to really read the wrapper.

      1. There is a trend that if certain people do something everyone else has to know about it and follow along.

        Its a mental condition, if you ask me.

  9. The Beef Lobby was my nickname in high school.

    1. Cartoons?

  10. I’ve read that

    a. Farming kills animals. Not for food, but either by accidents (tractor vs. squirrel) or deliberately to keep them from eating the food.

    b. White vegans are eating all the quinoa. The people who used to eat it as part of their native diet are doing without and suffering for it.

    c. Farming is rife with child labor.

    1. White vegans are eating all the quinoa. The people who used to eat it as part of their native diet are doing without and suffering for it.

      All of that and it only costs ten times as much as wheat!

      1. Not if you are one of the natives who were planting and eating it.

  11. An interesting take on the state of food production in the modern era:

    http://fusion.tv/show/food-exp…..r-hedayat/

    I’ve watched the first few episodes, and they really are enlightening. Watch the one on milk. It will make you reject cow’s milk and drink almond milk forever.

    1. The episode on water, however, was more hippy-dippy than based on science.

    2. It will make you reject cow’s milk and drink almond milk forever.

      What leads you to this conclusion?

      1. 1. Mistreatment of the cows
        2. The corrupt deals between the dairy industry and the fast-food industry to deliberately create fast food products that result in an overconsumption of dairy products

        Basically, the dairy industry as currently configured is *too efficient* so they have turned to backroom corporate deals and government rent-seeking in order to artificially inflate demand and inflate prices.

        1. Neither of those things are insurmountable problems. In fact I’m not seeing what the problem is with #2 unless you’re claiming that people are too stupid to demand, uh, less dairy in their fast food or something.

        2. So keeping a cow in a semi-confined space and draining its milk multiple times in a day is mistreatment?

          Did you know that cows are social animals and like semi-confined spaces?
          Did you know that cows like to have their utters drained multiple times a day or its painful?
          Did you know that cows in an open field tend to hang around one another even if they have acres and acres of field?

          I think you are misusing the word “mistreatment” and it dilutes its meaning.

          Cows are food and most American beef producers treat their animals well before turning those animals into slabs of beef.

          1. No I mean actual mistreatment of cows.

        3. “”2. The corrupt deals between the dairy industry and the fast-food industry to deliberately create fast food products that result in an overconsumption of dairy products”‘

          If it’s wrong for a fast food place to have milkshakes, I don’t want to be right.

        4. 1. Mistreatment of the cows

          Doesn’t bother me. If cows didn’t want to be mistreated then they would rise up against their oppressors.

          2. The corrupt deals between the dairy industry and the fast-food industry to deliberately create fast food products that result in an overconsumption of dairy products

          Corrupt deals are a fact of life. Avoiding everything that has corrupt deals involved would lead to living in the woods.

    3. Fat chance of that, I grew up in farming country, and the only result was that I’m willing to eat things Andrew Zimmerman would turn pale at the sight of. Had an extra wide kitchen counter for butchering deer, even.

      Though working at the local Vlasics plant did put me off (store bought) relish for a few years.

      1. Just watch the dairy episode.

        1. Just watch the dairy episode.

          At 4, I’d feed our chickens. About once a week a chicken I fed in the morning would end up on the plate at dinner. At 6, I watched our dairy cow get butchered. At 8, I sold my own, personal first pig at auction. From the age of about 10 until I was 16, I would get up every morning during the summer and carry at least two, 5-gallon buckets full of dead piglets to the sludge pit for disposal. I’ve not only hunted and clean the kills, I’ve had to shoot injured and sick animals as well as nuisance companion animals. Even worse, I’ve seen livestock and companion animals injure their owners, sometimes severely. Probably until the day I die I’ll count donning rubber gloves to turn a fresh-roasted hog still too hot from the smoker into pulled pork as one of life’s greater joys. Send me a URL where I can watch the video for free and I’ll watch while drinking a glass of milk.

        2. I would hope that the future of humanity that includes kind of people who need to have their food sterilized and prepackaged both biologically and morally would lead to some phenomenal minds of seeming unbounded intelligence. The fact that it, instead, seems to belong people who see one video and are so fundamentally changed forever that they go out and start proselytizing, means I officially renounce my humanity and look forward to Trump, Russian Hackers, and Facebook burning your humanity to the ground.

          1. I’m not proselytizing anything. If you don’t want to watch the videos then don’t. I only offered it as an example of a different take on the state of food production in this country. If you can watch the videos and debunk them all as full of lies based on your vast reservoir of personal experience, then bully for you. The types of experiences that you are describing however are NOT the ones that are described in the series. We as a country don’t get our bacon by and large from 8-year-old kids selling pigs at auctions. We get them from factory farms of vast size using mass production techniques. So I’m glad you had a childhood with such a direct connection to the land. Personally I’m a city person and frankly I don’t even really like the outdoors all that much. If I had a choice between spending a vacation watching movies or going camping, I would choose the movies 10 times out of 10. But your childhood experiences are basically irrelevant to the mass production of food in the country.

      2. I’m not surprised. The relish industrial complex has big money lobbyist keeping whistle-blowers quiet.

        1. It’s more a matter of the dumpster for sweeping the floor being right next to the dumpster for substandard cukes destined for relish. Let’s just say mistakes happen, and leave it at that.

    4. No it wont. A butch of peta propaganda by firstworlders with too few real problems in their life. Spoiled morons.

  12. “When you visit a grocery, literal-mindedness is a handicap. Apple butter is actually not a dairy product. Grape-Nuts cereal omits grapes as well as nuts. Corn dogs don’t need leashes.””

    And hamburgers have no ham.

    1. And frankfurters aren’t frank.

      1. I was going to mention lederkase, and then I realized the problem might just be Germans.

        1. Actually Leberk?se can contain both liver and cheese. (But not leather.)

          And it’s goddamn delicious.

            1. Blocked here. What is it?

              1. Sorry, forgot about your work computer. It’s a guy with glasses captioned “Actually…”

                1. Ha – that’s me, all right. Bonus points if it has its index finger raised at the viewer.

      2. And the Holy Roman Empire was neither Holy, nor Roman, nor an Empire.

      3. Girl Scout cookies aren’t made with real Girl Scouts.

        1. The most disappointing fact of all.

      4. “”And frankfurters aren’t frank.”‘

        Have you seen frank lately?

    2. And watermelon has no….

      Nevermind.

      1. environmentalists (green on the outside, red in the middle)

    3. And potato chips have no….

      Jesus, I am so bad at this.

      1. French fries have no frogs…

        1. That joke has no legs.

  13. There should be a law forcing all products to be labeled on the basis of whether I personally am going to like it and whether it will affect me specifically in some adverse manner.

    Alternatively I could just try brands until I find one I like regardless of the name or packaging, but then what would the government have to live for?

  14. The cure for all this crazy is a couple of weeks on the killing floor.

    I boned hog snouts. 2,000 a day. Back in ’63.

    1. These masturbation euphemisms are getting pretty abstract.

  15. The interesting thing is, the term “meat” can also be used for the pulpy part of certain fruits or vegetables, and has been for a long time. The liquid inside coconuts? Usually referred to as “milk” and has been for a long time. Are they going to want us to re-define those long-used terms as well?

    1. In 1907 Attorney General Bonaparte (a precursor to Beauregard) redefined practically everything Americans ate, drank or smoked to suit fanatics and lobbyists. Prohibition laws increased in number, breadth, scope and violence all that year. Republicans will of course swear that that had NOTHING to do with the panic of 1907 or the multi-year depression that follows all such orgies of Altrurian coercive meddling. Inductive reasoning is not faith-based.

  16. “But they might as well try to milk a steer.”

    Milk a steer, and you’ve got a friend for life.

  17. much ado about nothing. This isnt a crony push for anticompetitve behavior. No restrictions on the trade in the product, just the proper terms to market.

    A core function of the government has always been to help define the terms of trade, whether it is a uniform unit of measure or a proper descriptive term. The only alternative is civil actions for fraud, which would be endless.

    As a consumer, i expect terms of trade to be clear. If its animal meat it should clearly say so…if its lab prepared..It should not hide that fact.

  18. At about the time Republican President T. Roosevelt was enforcing the Comstock Laws making conversations about birth control worth a federal 10-year prison term, margarine was illegal in many places in America.

  19. REASONABLE labeling laws are one of the few forms of “regulation” that I don’t think are completely horrible. It’s essentially anti-fraud laws, fraud being a no-no even in libertopia.

    The key thing here is REASONABLE. People shouldn’t be able to take fake vegan meat and label it solely “Billy’s Hamburger” for instance, with no mention of it being 100% plant based. They could be taken to court, and lose, based upon fraud for that IMO. However having it say it’s vegan in a very tiny font somewhere hidden would technically make it legit, but clearly shady.

    I’d be okay with it being required to at least have that tiny print, because then there is technically no fraud. The fact is that what is fraudulent or not is largely just up to common sense.

    Plant based meat SHOULD be cheaper than real meat, as raising meat is expensive. So what if a company decided to make 99% plant burgers, and add 1% real beef to theoretically avoid fraud charges. Is that legit? Should they not have to label it as anything other than normal beef?

    Obviously that isn’t beef. What if it was 51% beef and 49% plant? Is it beef then? That’s why we have stupid laws.

    While the REASONABLENESS is often lost by idiot guvmint employees, just because implementation is bad doesn’t mean the underlying premise is bad. Labeling laws can be okay if they’re sane. Making companies say their burger is 49%plant/51% beef makes it a legitimate product, and not a fraud as it would be unlabeled.

  20. Uhh… there is not as yet actually such thing as “synthetic beef” so the farming people have a point.

    1. And yet we still have genuine Naugahyde.

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