Police Abuse

NYC Police Union to Limit 'Get Out of Jail Free' Cards

Some cops are livid, the New York Post reports.

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Paul Martinka / Splash News/Newscom

New York City's largest police union, the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, is limiting the number of "courtesy cards" it distributes to its membership, according to the New York Post. The paper says the group is reducing the number of cards it's giving to active police officers from 30 to 20, and to retired cops from 20 to 10. This was reportedly a reaction to the discovery that some of the cards were on sale at eBay.

The courtesy cards—or "get out of jail free cards," as the Post calls them—can be pretty valuable. While some Patrolmen's Benevolent Associations insist the cards are just public relations tools, the New York union "encourages officers to avoid ticketing cardholders," Newsday explains. The union presumably agrees with Newsday's interpretation, since it has posted the article on its website.

The cards cut to the heart of the problem with public-sector unions: They create an environment where government employees who are supposed to "serve and protect" the public instead get extra privileges. This is particularly dangerous with police unions, whose membership is armed by the state to enforce laws. Such unions regularly push for rules that protect bad cops.

The courtesy cards illuminate the culture of entitlement prevalent in much of law enforcement. Cops expect the cards to protect their friends and families from the indignity of punishment for a minor traffic violation or some other infraction of a petty law. But what about the rest of us?

"They are treating active members like shit, and retired members even worse than shit," an unnamed retired New York cop on disability told the Post. "All the cops I spoke to were very disappointed they couldn't hand them out as Christmas gifts."

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  1. “They are treating active members like shit, and retired members even worse than shit,” an unnamed retired New York cop on disability told the Post. “All the cops I spoke to were very disappointed they couldn’t hand them out as Christmas gifts.”

    Yeah and I hear next they are going to make us write a report every time we shoot a dog. I will be spending my entire day writing reports like some fag.

    1. “They are treating active members like shit, and retired members even worse than shit,” an unnamed retired New York cop on disability told the Post.

      It’s hard to read this as anything other than an admission that the NYPD treats non-cops way worse than shit as a matter of course, which certainly jibes with observed actions.

      1. Retired on disability potentially means full pension at an early age and reduced or eliminated taxes on that pension. I don’t want to hear any sob stories from this person.

        1. Yeah, I got two words for this guy: “Boo” and “Hoo”.

  2. s limiting the number of “courtesy cards” it distributes to its membership, according to the New York Post.

    Ed, the link is incorrect. Since I am better than you – and other geek reading this website – I will correctly link the story right here.

    You’re welcome.

    1. Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association boss Pat Lynch slashed the maximum number of cards that could be issued to current cops from 30 to 20, and to retirees from 20 to 10, sources told The Post.

      Oh. Snap.

  3. This was reportedly a reaction to the discovery that some of the cards were on sale at eBay.

    “All the cops I spoke to were very disappointed they couldn’t hand them out as Christmas gifts.”

    What exactly prevents these cards from being counterfeited? Asking for a friend.

    1. They take the cards which have the officer’s name on them, if the violation is serious (or the arresting officer is feeling especially dickish). They then give the guy who handed it out a heads up that his nephew/cousin/mistress us on the naughty list. I’m sorry they could reproduce a few, but I wouldn’t want to be caught giving a bogus card out. I like my dog more than that.

      1. But sold on eBay? What the hell do I care about somebody else’s dog?

        Maybe pissing in my own pool would be a problem but as long as that’s not the case, I can’t fathom how this would find it’s way back and/or be legally actionable.

  4. Wait…did I just read what I think I did? JFC, can I buy a few indulgences too?

  5. “A source said Lynch ordered the cutback to stop the sale of the cards, which were being hawked on eBay last week for as much as $200.”

    This is some impressive logic here. What happens to an item’s price when you limit its supply?

    1. Don’t say the e-word. You might trigger some folks.

      1. Engorgement? That always triggers my girlfriend

  6. That doesn’t seem very Benevolent.

  7. A source said Lynch ordered the cutback to stop the sale of the cards, which were being hawked on eBay last week for as much as $200.

    Thus demonstrating a predictable economic illiteracy. The price on eBa

  8. Cops got busted for fixing tickets in the Bronx in 2011

    Bronx cops picketed over the prosecutions

    http://observer.com/2011/10/ny…..-protests/

  9. Now that’s a real shame

  10. The quote: “Being a reporter or photographer is a public trust and we take that seriously,” about anyone in the “news” business was the biggest laugh line, though the one about public sector unions “regularly push for rules that protect bad cops” came close.
    That being said, the idea of these cards is an anathema to good policing. I can’t understand how they are legal.
    Police officers should use reasonable discretion when deciding to give a ticket, or just a warning. This tilts the scales towards those who are politically connected.
    Sounds like something the demoncrap party, to which most union leaders belong, would be in favor of.

  11. Good God, how are those even legal?

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