Drug Policy

Philando Castile’s ‘Audacity To Smoke Marijuana’ in Front of Child Doomed Him, Says Cop Who Killed Him

Welcome to one of the darkest corners of your War on Drugs, ladies and gentlemen.

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David Joles/ZUMA Press/Newscom

The shooting death last summer of Philando Castile, a licensed-and-law-abiding gun owner and cafeteria manager, by a Minnesota policeman provoked outrage over police brutality, especially since Castile's girlfriend was able to livestream the horrific event. Castile was shot seven times as he reached for his license and even though his girlfriend's young daughter was sitting in the backseat of his car.

The acquittal of St. Anthony Officer Jeronimo Yanez has led to a similar outpouring of anger, especially in light of dashcam footage that "shows a cop who panicked and killed an innocent man," in the words of Reason's Jacob Sullum.

A transcript of Yanez's explanation of his state of mind should only fuel more public discussion and calls to action.

From the Daily News:

"I thought if he's, if he has the, the guts and the audacity to smoke marijuana in front of the five-year-old girl and risk her lungs and risk her life by giving her secondhand smoke and the front seat passenger doing the same thing then what, what care does he give about me," Yanez told the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

Full transcript here.

The mind boggles: Secondhand smoke as a license to kill? Yanez even acknowledges that the girl "was in my line of fire" but that he "directed his firearm down…as best I could" to avoid her.

Yanez may face federal charges in the case and Castile's family plans to file a civil suit against him and the St. Anthony police force.

Regardless of any of that, Yanez's mind-set is incredibly telling not simply of his personal psychology but of a national mental disorder induced and exacerbated by the decades-old drug war. The drug war is not simply a set of laws and criminal procedures. It's much more like the Cold War, what I call a "structuring event" in American life that touches every aspect of our culture, politics, and commerce. From a 2006 talk I gave at a Students for a Sensible Drug Policy conference, on the topic of "What Would a Sensible Drug Policy Look Like?":

The drug war screws with everything that it touches, and it touches everything…What I want to do is try to create a post-prohibitionist mind-set, where we are no longer merely reacting to prohibition and trying to get rid of it, because in a way we become twinned with it….

When we talk about the Tour de France, we talk about drugs. When we talk about Major League Baseball, we talk about who's using them. Plan Colombia and a good chunk of our foreign policy is all about drugs. Hundreds of thousands of people are in jail because of drug policy. All of you [students] probably went through some form of bogus drug education program, all for no good reason. The real dead-end of this is…[found] in men's rooms in America. When you go and take a piss, there is a pretty good chance that the urinal cake holder, the thing that deodorizes it…says 'Say No To Drugs' on it….

The quick version of my sensible drug policy, of a post-prohibitionist policy, is that it would be smarter to regulate all drugs, including prescription drugs, somewhat like we do with alcohol….

Like drug warriors…we will need to stop imbuing inanimate objects with supernatural powers.

The drug war is over, if we want it—to paraphrase a famous anti-Vietnam war slogan. The end of the war starts up here, in our heads, and then proceeds out to the actual America. The starting point for a sensible drug policy, a true post-prohibitionist mind-set that does not participate in any way with prohibitionist thinking, would be take seriously the credo of the Whole Earth Catalog…"We are as gods, and we might as well get good at it." Ironically, the first step to becoming gods may be to recognize that drugs are only one means among many for changing who we are, how we live, and what we will become.

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From the minute we're born, we are bombarded with messages and lessons about how drugs are bad, evil, and uniquely destructive; how they inherently give rise to criminality, violence, and mayhem; how we must forever be on the lookout for users, avoid becoming users (read: addicts!) ourselves, and rat out anyone we see using them; and on and on. Never mind that most of these dicta are utter bullshit, that it's the black-market status of drugs that brings violence and makes abuse more likely, and that the drug war has always been about controlling various threatening populations (minorities, youth, you name it). Or that over the past several decades, we have become veritable drug-taking machines (not a bad thing), relying on pills and herbs and exercise to treat our torpor, depression, and lack of focus and drive in everything from work to play to sex.

I don't doubt Yanez for a moment that in his frantic heart of hearts, he actually believed what he's quoted as saying above. That somehow all the lessons he—we—have been taught about the evils of pot, tobacco, "audacity," and more kicked in and amped up his fear, anxiety, and panic to a point where he was killing a man in the name of secondhand smoke and child endangerment. I say this not to exonerate him but to better understand where he and most of us are coming from. For the past 50 and 100 years, we have been propagandized relentlessly to believe the worst about drug users, even users of mostly harmless and chill-inducing substances such as weed. We won't actually be able to stop tragedies like the death of Philando Castile from happening until we unwind the drug war and its massive effect on our collective psyche.

We've been doing this, of course, especially over the past 21 years during which medical marijuana was first legalized. Recreational pot is even legal now in a handful of states and that number will only grow and force us to reevaluate the legal status of other, "harder" drugs. Not necessarily so we can all start snorting coke and ketamine, or dropping acid and mescaline like the long-lost children of Timothy Leary. No, so we can start being more honest with ourselves about the arbitrary lines between legal and what the government likes to insist are "illicit" drugs (not just illegal, you see, but immoral), and we can actually avail ourselves of a bigger and better pharmacopia. So we can also unwind laws and customs and habits of mind that have had massively disproportionate effects on the most vulnerable groups of people (minorities, the poor) and have produced the very violence and crime that we were trying to eliminate.

"We are as gods, and we might as well get good at it." We weren't good enough at it to save Philando Castile and millions of others whose lives have been snuffed out or derailed or made horrific for no good goddamn reason at all. The only questions that remain are whether and when we will be able to prevent senseless suffering in the future.

Watch "The Drug War as a "Structuring Event" in American Life."

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102 responses to “Philando Castile’s ‘Audacity To Smoke Marijuana’ in Front of Child Doomed Him, Says Cop Who Killed Him

  1. So, presumably, if he had been smoking a cigarette in the car, the cop would have just opened fire immediately. And if the little girl died too, well it was for her own good.

    1. This is why cop cars need mounted RPGs and Miniguns.

    2. Was this guy A grown up Ralph Wiggum?

  2. This putrid fuck needs to slink away into the abyss of repressed memory.

    Also as a pot smoking Minnesotan reading this and who’s dealt with Johnny Fuckbadge before, let me just take a moment to thank my fair complexion and the holy protection it provides me with.

    1. … and take Sessions with him

    2. How about the fact that you weren’t reaching for a gun?

  3. The Drug War — the second worst legacy of the Reagan presidency.
    Never forget, never forgive.

    1. Credit goes to Nixon, not Reagan, for starting this mess. though there’s Nancy’s ‘just say no’, and the Clinton era’s ‘this is your brain on drugs’

      1. True, but Carter had let it fade away considerably. The Reagan Administration could have followed suit, but decided to ramp it up an order of magnitude in order to fight the rising tide of hippie degeneracy.

        1. Jimmy Carter poisoned the pot supply with paraquat. He wanted users to pay a physical price.

      2. More like Woodrow Wilson. We’ve had a WoDs since 1914, with FDR opening up the marijuana front in 1937.

      3. Not to nitpick, but the “brain on drugs” thing does predate the Clinton administration.

    2. Reefer Madness far predates the Reagan admin. And as PurityDiluting pointed out, it was Nixon who first ramped up the “War on Drugs,” even coining the term.

      1. This shit goes back to the Harrison Act, and before. A lot of ratcheting it up, but the origins lie way back with racism against the Chinese and the opium “scourge” that was destroying… nothing.

        1. The Harrison act initially targeted physicians, but yes.

    3. It started with Bayer selling heroin as children’s cough syrup.

      Somebody had to put a stop to that! And by somebody, we all know it is righteous and benevolent government agents. ;-(

  4. “I thought if he’s, if he has the, the guts and the audacity to smoke marijuana in front of the five-year-old girl and risk her lungs and risk her life by giving her secondhand smoke and the front seat passenger doing the same thing then what, what care does he give about me,” Yanez told the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

    Spot on assessment. My brother got addicted that way, and later overdosed from acute dope poisoning. Remember, kids: pot kills.

    1. My brother got addicted that way, and later overdosed from acute dope poisoning. Remember, kids: pot kills.

      He must’ve been a half brother or otherwise not related by blood. Otherwise, I can’t reckon how the THC secondhand smoke specters didn’t just reap you right along with the rest of his family. It’s so frightening, I won’t even buy a car from a guy if he looks like he’s ever gotten high.

    2. Mercy killing really. Saved him from a lifetime of unspeakable acts in men’s washrooms and the eventuality of prostituting his daughter to get his fix. Later on Yanez will be revered as a hero by the daughter for saving her from such wretched misery.

      In conjunction with anti-drug hysteria, I’d submit Yanez’s reaction was in part fuel by anti-gun hysteria. It’s like guns are some black art able to deal death with a thought (and I’d assume a portion of Yanez’s training must have included how often people miss when under duress… something he might have had in mind before firing into a vehicle with a 5 year old girl).

  5. ””I thought if he’s, if he has the, the guts and the audacity to smoke marijuana in front of the five-year-old girl and risk her lungs and risk her life by giving her secondhand smoke and the front seat passenger doing the same thing then what, what care does he give about me,” Yanez told the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension””

    This reeks of something he made up after the fact.

    1. Maybe his lawyer advised against the “I’m a huge pussy who doesn’t trust blacks” defense.

    2. No way! There’s no way that he was acting irrational based in the presence of a gun. It’s obviously anti-reefer madness.

    3. If he didn’t have a care about the cop then, I imagine he fucking loves him now.

    4. The lawyer probably knew they were up against some “drugs are bad mmmkay” types and figured that defense would be most effective.

    5. TrickyVic (old school): My thoughts exactly!

    6. They smoked dope on a regular basis. You just might want to consider that what Castile had been smoking may have impaired his judgement and that’s why he failed to follow orders and he did something stupid.

      The cop was cool up to the point he told him 3 times not to reach for the gun and Castile didn’t stop.

  6. I guess his only regret is that he lacks the reflexes for the proper response to the situation.

  7. “law-abiding gun owner”???

    Last I heard, marijuana was not legal in Minnesota. It diminishes your argument (not a lot, but a bit) making statements that aren’t true.

    1. I’m sure he exceeded the speed limit and littered too. GOOD SHOOT.

      1. Don’t forget about the broken brake light too. That’s at least 4 crimes! We should be thanking Officer Yanez for bravely dispatching this menace to society. /sarc

    2. Medicinal marijuana is legal in MN, but only in pill form, not car freshener form.
      Concealed carry is also legal in MN if you get the license.
      Broken tail lights, however …

      1. Carrying while using or in possession of illegal narcotics is illegal in MN.

        1. That’s relevant because marijuna is a narcotic… wait, oops.

          1. “That’s relevant because marijuna is a narcotic… wait, oops.”

            Fail.
            Benadryl isn’t a narcotic either, is perfectly legal over the counter, but you’re not supposed to drive while taking it.

    3. Last I heard, marijuana was not legal in Minnesota. It diminishes your argument (not a lot, but a bit) making statements that aren’t true.

      Last I heard, he wasn’t tried, convicted of, or even pulled over for possession. I can’t disagree with your second statement.

    4. The penalty for marijuana possession is NOT death. Not even close. Not. Even. Close. I don’t give a shit if it’s a cop stop or not, you don’t kill someone for suspicion of having a roach in the ashtray.

      1. “The penalty for marijuana possession is NOT death.”

        He wasn’t shot for smoking dope. He was shot because he was told 3 times not to reach for his gun and did not stop.

    5. I suppose that’s true. But how many gun owners have never broken any laws?

      Anyway, we have so many laws that shouldn’t be that I’m not sure “law abiding” is really a standard we should aspire to.

      1. There is not a single person in America who has not broken a law. The only difference is if we were prosecuted for it.

  8. “I thought if he’s, if he has the, the guts and the audacity to smoke marijuana in front of the five-year-old girl and risk her lungs and risk her life by giving her secondhand smoke and the front seat passenger doing the same thing then what, what care does he give about me,” Yanez told the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

    That’s one hell of a lot of tangential thinking going on in those few seconds that he was making lethal decisions. What else was he thinking about? “The tires appeared to be under inflated. I was worried that anyone that reckless with the safety of his passengers could easily turn a gun on me without warning.”

    1. When he says “I thought”, he is not specifying the time. He didn’t think it at the time of the shooting, he thought it some time later during a helpful conversation with his attorney.

  9. Oh for fuck’s sake, WEAR SOMETHING ELSE you hipster doofus.

    1. You take that back. The Jacket needs his Gillespie.

    2. It’s his shtick. Let it go.

  10. This man, Yanez, is too stupid to live.

    This is not just the drug war but anti-tobacco campaigns and the overprotection of children. I do not which is worse, that he might believe that nonsense or that he thnks that oeople will buy that excuse for his panic and incompetence.

    1. or that he thnks that oeople will buy that excuse for his panic and incompetence.

      The evidence seems to suggest that at least 12 people did. And judging by some of the cop fellating comments I’ve seen floating around the last couple of days, I’d say there’s a lot more than just the 12 who let him off.

      1. The entire commentariat at the Federalist was licking Yanez’s nutsack all day after the verdict.

  11. “I thought if he’s, if he has the, the guts and the audacity to smoke marijuana in front of the five-year-old girl and risk her lungs and risk her life by giving her secondhand smoke and the front seat passenger doing the same thing then what, what care does he give about me,” Yanez told the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

    Bull. Shit. There’s not fucking way he had enough time in the, what was it, 10 seconds(?) between the time he first screamed “Don’t pull it [the gun] out” at Castille to the time he fired the last of the 7 rounds he pumped into him. That’s just his post-facto rationalization for why he panicked and murdered an innocent man.

    I really, truly, hope Jeronimo Yanez gets Lou Gehrig’s disease.

    1. By ‘it’ he was clearly refering to a joint. There’s really no other explanation.

      1. I figured he was talking about his dick. Nothing is scarier or more threatening than a black man’s penis.

        1. You’ve obviously BTDT.

  12. If you read the “Conservative” websites and their Facebook pages and the comments sections, you would thin that Castille was a dangerous drug kingpin killed by a hero cop or something. For State-worshippers, the cops can do no wrong.

    1. I thought I read some ‘conservative’ sites, but apparently not the ones you do. Got any links?

      1. The Federalist.

    2. This is part of the reason I am no longer a conservative. They do not believe in small government. They just differ from the left in how the Nanny State should work.

      1. and what parts of our lives the nanny state should micromanage

  13. Does anybody definitively know whether the jury heard what broadcast over the police band and was, subsequently, widely distributed over the news? I would’ve thought that it would be included in the video, but it doesn’t appear to be. Did they even hear it? It’s absence would seem to strongly suggest that the (kangaroo) court was involved in editing narration from an incoherent series of apologetic fabrications into a coherent and multi-faceted justification.

  14. Come on Gillespie. Blaming Yanez’ mindset on the war on drugs is plain silly. That was just one straw easy for the grasping.

    Consider that a CBS news anchor recently said the attempted assassination of a congressman was “self inflicted.”

    I’d say the problem runs deeper than anything wrought by the stupid war on (some) intoxicants.

    1. Blaming Yanez’ mindset on the war on drugs is plain silly.

      In a normal world, would there be any reason to be so scared that a dope-smoking hippie might be paranoid and packing?

  15. “I thought if he’s, if he has the, the guts and the audacity to smoke marijuana in front of the five-year-old girl and risk her lungs and risk her life by giving her secondhand smoke and the front seat passenger doing the same thing then what, what care does he give about me,” Yanez told the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.”

    In other words – he didn’t act sufficiently fearful of the cop. Good to keep in mind, I guess.

  16. It’s like the fucking wild west, Jesus. Having a guy shot in front of the child, no problem there!

  17. His whole statement re: weed came across as someone who smokes weed every single day and was overcompensating.

    “Why, I detected what I believe you call marijuana, whose smell I learned about in cop school, and I was such a good student I could determine the difference between smoked and unsmoked. Did I mention I hate drugs?”

  18. Am I the only one here (or anywhere) who thinks that drugs are bad and should be legal? I have smoked shit loads of pot, did a fair amount of hash, coke and LSD when I was young but I at some point decided that it wasn’t in my best interest to continue. I think drugs are not good for you even though I can’t really argue that moderate use, like using many other ‘bad’ things is not going to kill you.

    But I finally became convinced that the government should not have jurisdiction over what you ingest and the obvious collateral damage by their continued campaign to stop people from ingesting things that are not good for them is more harmful than helpful. It is in keeping with my open minded approach to things- if you want to fuck yourself up go ahead, it’s not my business and it shouldn’t be the government’s business. I used to sort of think that MJ should be legal I don’t know about heroin but I now have the attitude that to achieve my own belief of limited government, it is the only way. Legalize it all and let god sort them out.

    I know I’ll probably get shit for my position but that’s the way I feel and as long as I’m board who should care.

    1. I think the evidence is in that prohibition causes vastly more problems than it solves, regardless of the drug. Highly addictive things like opiates probably shouldn’t be available at every 7-11, but there’s a spectrum between prohibition and full availability called regulation.

      Ideally people who have a “problem” with drugs, for example if they’re addicted, there should be no more stigma in seeking treatment for it than for any other medical condition. As a liberal I’d like to see that as part of a social services program, of course, but a libertarian could simply say that you can get treatment if you can afford it, and if you can’t afford it you and your descendants can get stuck in a cycle of addiction and poverty forever.

      1. And Tony, I disagree with your assertion regarding the libertarian view of treatment. Surely the libertarian view is ‘accept responsibility for your own actions’. If one is going to indulge in potentially life threatening recreations then the responsible thing would be to cover ones bases – e.g. contribute to mountain rescue organizations so they may be able to help if one gets stuck; or carrying about ones person a supple of Naxalone (sp?) in case one exceeds the dosage.

        Personally, I dislike having to fund other peoples bad decisions – bluntly ‘if they can afford the habit they can afford the ‘insurance’.

      2. Tony, you assume that people have no agency; that authority must step in and act on their behalf.

        Libertarians assume every person is his own agent. Let the chips fall where they may.

      3. Cheap treatment supported by charity if necessary is widely available in Libertopia.

    2. Hey Se7en,

      I agree ……..

      I need not mention alcohol prohibition as we all know how that turned out.

      The thing is the politicians like to govern the people; they will get popular support if they can govern something that the majority of people will go along with. The fact the a large percentage of these drugs are available to the general public is ignored because authorized distributors – doctors – supply them.

      My view maybe more controversial than you – ‘can out-contraverse you :-)’ – but life / nature throws out these methods to maintain some kind of equilibrium on our small plot but rather than allowing the herd to be thinned-out some of the herd decide in their arrogance to accept the challenge and defeat it.

      I like beer, and wine, and driving cars, and rock-climbing, and drinking coffee, and eating cheese mad from unpasteurized milk, etc. etc. all of these things are ‘going to kill me’ according to some expert. They may be true but I reserve the right to make my own decisions. After all, you have to die of something.

      1. This is life. No one gets out alive!

    3. Sorry Se7en,

      Had to edit my response due the 1500 character limit so response to Tony appeared before mine to to you.

      I am sure that you will be able to conflate my responses into the logical sequence.

    4. I agree with you Number 7. I grew up in the projects surrounded by drugs and saw how they can destroy lives- users and people who are voluntarily or involuntarily with the users. My brother used to sell pot (and probably other stuff) out of his bedroom so I saw as people sunk deeper and deeper.

      At the same time, though, the war on drugs did nothing to stop use and it seemed to make it worse. The more I thought about it, the more I realized that a lot of what government does encourages the use of drugs. Most notably is compulsory education that imprisons children during the time of their lives when it’s especially important to be in the real world doing real things. Drugs are a great way to escape while being trapped in a room bored half to death. The logical conclusion for me was that if we wanted to decrease drug use, we had get the government out of people’s lives from childhood on including legalizing drugs even *gasp* heroin.

      I’ve since met many people who use drugs recreationally and can handle it. That’s fine but I still don’t think drugs good for people on any level. I realize that most libertarians don’t agree with me but, as a libertarian, I can accept that.

      1. Anything the political state bans increases in price by roughly 400%. If it kills someone, there is no product liability. That is some powerful marketing.

    5. Social Darwinism. Love it!

    6. “Am I the only one here (or anywhere) who thinks that drugs are bad and should be legal?”

      It’s very dangerous to make generalizations. To give an example:

      I use clonazepam (klonopin). For a brief time, I was using a fair amount of it. No need to go into details, but the bottom line was it solved a significant problem for me (resulting in multiple emergency room visits). But I also found out that it may really depress my heart rate during sleep. Also, it now makes me feel ill, with relatively minor amounts.

      So is clonazepam “good” or “bad”? The answer is–even for me–“it depends”. What is the amount? What is the problem and how bad is it? What are the side effects and how bad are they?

      Or to give another example, as I recall, Montell Williams has said that marijuana saved his life. He apparently literally got a gun to commit suicide to avoid the pain from multiple sclerosis.

      So is marijuana “good” or “bad”? The answer is, “It depends.” It depends on the person, the amount, the reason for taking it, the side effects, etc. etc.

  19. The drug delusion really picked up steam with Harry Anslinger and the Fed Bureau of Narcotics and also the inherently anti-Mexican “savage” portrayal during the first half of the 20th century. Not to mention it’s association with black music during that era too.

    Then I think of all those 1980s stock traders high on coke when pulling the lever for Reagan.

    1. Think of all the soccer moms today doing the exact same drugs as “street thugs” only in pill form picked up at Walgreens.

      1. Running for the shelter of their mother’s little helper……………

  20. Quite saying a “licensed-and-law-abiding gun owner” you can’t be licensed and own guns you may not like it but it is the law

    1. left the part out you can’t be licensed and law abiding and own guns “if you use pot.”

      this is not a comment about whether the cop did anything right or wrong but it does diminish the article since the leading statement is false.

      1. Another reason to end the war on drugs. This notion that users of marijuana, whether recreation or medical, shouldn’t have their 2nd Amendment rights is horrendous statist logic right up there with having to show “Good Reason” before you can get a permit to carry.

      2. How about “licensed and moral”?

  21. Ron,

    At a minimum, I would argue that within the context of Libertarianism one would consider an individual law abiding providing they were not violating the NAP. Let he who is truly law-abiding cast the first stone…at the stoner.

    Do you care to argue that the victim was somehow responsible or contributed to his own death vis-a-vis the weed? For the record, did the cop do anything wrong?

    Thomas Jefferson, “Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add ‘within the limits of the law’, because law is often but the tyrant’s will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.”

    1. The Platinum Rule

      No person may initiate force, threats of force or fraud against any others person’s self or property.

    2. beautiful quote. I really hate this law-abiding crap. It is an irrelevant issue. If you have the right to do something the law be damned.

  22. Penalties for smoking weed have increased. Now it’s instant death penalty. No need for further consideration.

    1. Hey, the science is settled, according to Beauregard Sessions, the new Anointed General of the Prohibitionist Army of Occupation. Faith is the anti-drug.

  23. If we tried to drive chocolate off the market by force we’d probably end up thinking and saying similar things about chocolate, and having violence around chocolate.

  24. Just look at that fat pig of a pig.
    IQ in low double digits.
    Tell me why he’s not in jail for murder.
    America is lost.

  25. I don’t doubt Yanez for a moment that in his frantic heart of hearts, he actually believed what he’s quoted as

    But I don’t believe it for a minute. However, it’s bad enough that some jurors might’ve. I think he just got it in his head that this guy was an armed robber, and that he was about to shoot him. The other stuff he made up afterward. This cop was a bomb waiting to go off; who knows what might’ve set him off if it hadn’t been for this incident?

    Meanwhile, I can’t see regulating most prescription drugs in any way similarly to alcohol. What would you have, bars where I could take my heart meds? Check if I’m driving with them in my breath or urine? Send people to Contraceptives Anonymous if they kept having kids because not using the pills right?

  26. He’s not saying second-hand smoke is a license to kill. He’s saying that the suspect would probably hurt him. This is about risk evaluation.

    1. Except that the man was no smoking at that time. As a cop he assumed far too many things there. That moron does not deserve the badge.

      1. that’s too harsh, don’t you think.
        not deserving a badge?

      2. The badge of cowardice looks appropriate on that unconvicted murderer.

    2. yes, hope toy are evaluated like that

  27. hoping he dies after being shot in the face and suffering for a while

  28. I came here looking for facts to support this one officer’s allegation.
    I lol’d my ass off instead.
    Then I registered.

  29. The co-perpetrators and abettors will doubtless be appalled if they suddenly learn of a crowd-funded market to overturn their decisions. Then again, police at all levels turned into dry killers when beer was a felony and it really didn’t interest anybody outside of a small circle of friends.

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  31. “law-abiding gun owner”???

    Last I heard, marijuana was not legal in Minnesota. It diminishes your argument (not a lot, but a bit) making statements that aren’t true.
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