Congress

Libertarian-leaning Montana State Rep. Daniel Zolnikov is Thinking About Montana's One Federal House Seat

The anti-Trump Republican would like to bring his anti-spending, pro-Fourth Amendment philosophy to Congress.

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Daniel Zolnikov, a Republican state House member in Montana representing part of Billings, made some waves when he endorsed Libertarian Gary Johnson for president. As Matt Welch reported in July, Zolnikov and fellow Montana Republican Nicholas Schwaderer (R-Mineral County) said that especially on spending and 4th Amendment issues, Johnson was clearly superior to Donald Trump.

Montana legislature

Now Trump is about to be president, and wants Montana's sole sitting federal House member, Ryan Zinke, to be his secretary of the interior. If Zinke gets nominated, Montana will need to hold a special election to fill his seat.

Zolnikov said in a phone interview today that he is "strongly considering" a run for the seat. Rather than a statewide primary vote, in which Zolnikov expects he'd do well, the GOP's nominee for such a special election will be chosen by a vote of the state party's Central Committee, according to the Party's state chair Jeff Essmann on the state GOP's website.

In such a situation, where Party insiders make the choice, Zolnikov's open rebellion against his Party's (successful) presidential candidate could hurt.

But Zolnikov doesn't expect it to necessarily scuttle him. The Central Committee has membership weighted to county population, Zolnikov says, and the county he is from, Yellowstone, is the most populated in the state.

His primary objection to Trump, he said in this week's interview, is related to spending. But Zolnikov's legislative career since first winning office in 2012 shows a strong interest in other liberty issues where Trump's Republican Party is unlikely to be of much support, including due process and privacy. Zolnikov says Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul is his favorite sitting federal legislator.

Zolnikov's says he thinks his opposition to Trump could play out different ways with different Republicans. "Some people might be angry, some people might not care, some people might believe we need some solid checks and balances on the guy. They might like it that I wouldn't just be a yes man" in the House to a President Trump.

The composition of the central committee is changing between now and when such a vote on a Republican candidate for a special election would occur, he says, so he's not sure how that will play out. One of his prides as a representative is how he's spent "a year of my life" knocking on voters' doors and he doesn't think being anti-Trump would be poison with a general electorate should he get the Party's nomination. (He won his state House seat this year with 69 percent of the vote, after getting 71 percent in 2014, with what he says is a significantly redistricted electorate.)

How might he explain his Trump opposition to doubtful Republicans? "I am a firm believer that the legislative branch is there to keep the executive branch and judicial branch in check, we are all there to keep each other in check, and I think that will be as important in the next four years as it was in the last eight," he says.

"Do we want a larger government that one day the Democrats will take control of, or a smaller government that does not violate our rights? I think that will resonate with lots of people." Trump's apparent lack of concern with expanding spending and exploding the debt further, with his belief that we can just print more money whenever we need it, are what most alarm Zolnikov. He'd relish an opportunity to be the "a-hole in the room who can say what needs to be said" in Congress to spell out that "our fiscal situation is not pretty, we can't keep spending and spending."

How well does he expect to do? He can't really judge that now, he says, thinking it depends very much on the nature and popularity of the other people who ultimately decide to also seek the Party's nomination.

Zolnikov praised in Zinke a quality he thinks is one of his own best selling points: a positivity and ability to "bring people together; he's got leadership skills and no one is able to intimidate him, [yet he's] also able to talk to anybody. These are extremely valuable skills" in a legislator, he says.

"I'm known for bringing in a whole group of people into a process and letting them known literally it's their process, not just our little insider's game." He thinks you can be a consistent conservative while still being "extremely friendly" as a colleague in a legislature. "You have to have the ability to negotiate," and he thinks sometimes even congressmen he largely agrees with go about things like conflicts with the Speaker with too much "spite." He thinks one of his own Montana legislative victories, ending the practice of taking drivers licenses away over student debt, only happened because of an ability to partner up with colleagues on the left with whom he didn't agree on much.

He believes voters are less interested in partisan or ideological attacks on enemies and more on ways to make their life better: in his estimation, a bill he helped push to make Uber's presence in Montana legal was more important to his constituents than "nasty angry finger pointing" or the sort of big-picture political issues that politicians focus on more. (Zolnikov even drives for Uber.)

While he admits he hasn't fully thought out a foreign policy, he notes he has "a lot of friends who have gone to war and are now back and don't know why they went to war" and hearkens back to the Montana tradition of the first woman in Congress, Rep. Jeannette Rankin, who voted against U.S. entry into both World Wars I and II. (She was the only such vote on the latter.) "I'm not saying that was the right vote," he says, "but she was not willing to just vote for a war that was popular at the time, and that's an important part of Montana's heritage."

His Facebook page, where he discusses all his votes, sloganizes his concerns as "energy guns freedom." Among his legislative goals with energy, he says, are eliminating crony-capitalism special treatment of utilities in Montana law and fighting for easier legal access to ports for shipping Montana coal.

In general, he says, "my legislation has to do with rights, promoting all our rights, not just the Second Amendment." He points with pride to a bill he got through the Montana House, yet not alas the Senate, to mostly prevent state and local law enforcement from using license-plate scanners. He'd like an opportunity to inject more of that sort of pro-citizen, pro-liberty thinking into federal Congress.

NEXT: Anthony L. Fisher Joins Kat Timpf and Tom Shillue on Tonight's Kennedy

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  1. “(Zolnikov even drives for Uber.)”

    OK, let’s get this out of the way…

    He’s old enough for a learner’s permit?

    1. ALTERNATE JOKE: I’m not sure I can support a statist who believes earns his living driving on government-owned roads.

  2. He sounds more not pro-Trump than he sounds anti-Trump. But anti-Trump Republican is surely a better headline in Reason’s opinion.

    Also, that name, I tried searching him on the web, but didn’t come up with much, sounds East European to me. IOW, his parents or grandparents might have lived behind the Iron Curtain and I’ve noted that people from that background tend to be very pro-liberty as they get it, unlike our every own millennial sheep.

  3. Can you run for office without having a flag lapel pin showing in your official photo? Don’t they have laws about this sort of thing in Montana? (sarc)

  4. Yellowstone country is the largest county in the state of Montana, with a population of 147,972 people. If he leaves for DC, there will only be 147,971 people.

    1. Libertarian type folk don’t even count as real people. Ask a Census worker if you don’t believe me. One came to my door in 2010 and I told her I was leaving, which was true. She asked when she could come back and I told her to piss the fuck off and never come back.

      1. Sometimes I wonder if you’re an agent provocateur styled to make libertarians look bad, and then I realize you’re actually pretty innocuous and we just look bad anyway.

        1. We just look bad because assholes don’t like it when you’re an asshole back at them.

        2. She started giving some bullshit about how I was required to let her interrogate me. Umm, no, piss the fuck off, and your boss, Obama is a fucking retard.

      2. I’ve come across a census worker twice in my life and both times I told them to fuck off. I was told by the second one that I was breaking the law by not answering his questions, and he actually attempted to try to enter my apt with me standing in the doorway, so I shoved him back lightly and he did a soccer fall. I spent the next few weeks waiting for the gestapo but luckily nothing came of it.

        1. I just answered their questions for 5 minutes but I kept my tinfoil underwear on.

        2. You aren’t required to answer jack fucking shit.

        3. They tried that bullshit line with me too. I laughed at the girl and closed the door.

      3. Libertarian type folk don’t even count as real people. Ask a Census, poll worker if you don’t believe me. FTFY

    2. He should make his case to the Montana Republican Party that the House of Reps needs expanding – and he needs to be there by the 2020 apportionment so he can gather support.

      Montana would really be an interesting state to see how the idea of a more representative legislature with smaller districts plays out.

      1. especially since Montana got screwed by the fixed size of the current House. They had two reps from 1910 to 1980. Losing half your congressional representation in one apportionment is a real problem.

  5. Zolnikov’s says he thinks his opposition to Trump could play out different ways with different Republicans. “Some people might be angry, some people might not care, some people might believe we need some solid checks and balances on the guy. They might like it that I wouldn’t just be a yes man” in the House to a President Trump.

    Since the majority of the people who voted for Trump did so as a NO vote for Clinton, he may have a point.

    1. Any pressure brought to bear against deficit spending is a good thing.

    1. Gotta admit it, SIV. That’s fucking hillarious.

    2. “Another RINOtarian cuck.”

      Thanks, SIV, for proving again you are once and always an ignorant POS.
      Don’t ever change.

    3. Actually I could not agree more. Getting a job during summer at a pool is not a good path to developing a solid foreign policy. Dude should have gotten a job at a golf course.

      1. He should have *hustled* pool.

        1. It’s also a good political resume builder to play the piano at certain classy establishments.

    4. Everyone did jobs like this when they were young. Used to be that people believed that it built character. I guess all it’s worth now is fodder for mockery and shame.

      1. I think now you are supposed to take out excessive loans so you don’t have to work over the summer and it gives you something more to bitch about because you have massive debt. That way you can “community organize”, and not have to actually earn a paycheck providing a service of value.

        1. He’s 30 years old and weighing a run for the US Congress. I can see padding out the resume with a mention of summer jobs but as a self-styled “adventurer” (who supports increased public access to public lands) you’d think he might have been a hunting/ fishing guide or a competitive mountain biker or something. I’m sure he did a fine job sanding and painting those picnic tables.

          1. SIV|12.28.16 @ 11:16PM|#
            “He’s 30 years old…”

            And you’re, oh, 15, right?

          2. I have worked with guys who called themselves “adventurers”. They were guys who sat at a desk and took expensive ski trips that involved helicopters. That means nothing. Guys who work summer jobs at the pool are probably not going to be hunting guides. IMHO who gives a fuck. People do different stuff. I have sanded and painted picnic tables as well as packed elk out of the woods at 10,000 ft so I don’t really see your point, other than make some cheap shot at a job the guy had ten years ago.

          3. Well SIV, you certainly have him dead to rights. Everyone knows RINOs are always the ones sanding picnic tables.

      2. Turns ’em into RINOtarian cucks!

      3. There’s nothing wrong about doing that kind of work. I’ve done it and I’m sure my resume entry was just as funny. Making a little fun of that while saying, “Good job” is not such a bad thing. Just giving the kid a noogie.

        1. Nothing wrong? That’s a fucking understatement.

          I have the cash on hand to pay for my kids to go to college and grad school, and all 3 of them are still young. If they want it, they’re going to EARN it.

          Word of the day: EARN.

          1. I said I’ve done it and glad I have. As Louis CK said about the 20 year old complaining about the shit job he had to do, “That’s why we gave it to you!”. Can’t speak for SIV, but I’m giving the guy some light hearted ribbing.

            1. I believe it from you; SIV has proven to be someone who, where sarc might be desired, is dead serious.
              Like Playa (below), I’m waiting to hear the path to purity which SIV has trod…

              1. SIV has proven to be someone who, where sarc might be desired, is dead serious.

                he has a blog about women’s underwear and sincerely enjoys free jazz.

                I don’t think he’s as serious as you might think, but its probably hopeless suggesting it to you.

                1. “he has a blog about women’s underwear and sincerely enjoys free jazz.
                  I don’t think he’s as serious as you might think, but its probably hopeless suggesting it to you.”

                  The first does not support the second.

                2. “I don’t think he’s as serious as you might think, but its probably hopeless suggesting it to you.”

                  Oh, and, If you have evidence, I’d love to see it. “Suggesting” is probably a really good idea to those who are “suggestible”.

                  1. (shrug)

                    forget i said anything.

                    1. GILMORE?|12.29.16 @ 12:27AM|#
                      “(shrug)
                      forget i said anything.”

                      OK, but why did you bother? Is there something in “free jazz” and “women’s underwear” that tells you SIV is other than a lame Trump troll?

                    2. The “women’s underwear” thing tells me far more than it ought to.

                      It takes real effort to curate that sort of insanity.

                      I’ll say what everyone else is thinking: he’s trying them on right now, and he’ll be back in a few minutes.

                    3. I get the impression these people feel guilty for being private school trust-fund kids who grew up to be (or manage) cubicle-pussies and are projecting their insecurity based upon some distant memory of a harsh early life of having to park an American-made car with a manual transmission during a summer stint as a valet at the country club.

                    4. SIV|12.29.16 @ 12:58AM|#
                      “I get the impression these people feel guilty for being private school trust-fund kids who grew up to be (or manage) cubicle-pussies and are projecting their insecurity based upon some distant memory of a harsh early life of having to park an American-made car with a manual transmission during a summer stint as a valet at the country club.”

                      Your “impression” is really not worth shit, just to be clear.
                      Now, do we have a CV that tells us of your desire for women’s underwear and free jazz which convinces us of your purity as other than a CUCK ASSHOLE?
                      Just asking…

                    5. Ya, that’s it. If that was just sarcasm, well played. For the record, nope, no trust fund, and there was no valet parking at the golf course in the town I grew up in, and I never worked there. Or have I ever been employed in, or managed anyone in a cubicle.

                    6. Nothing says Country Club like an American car.

                      “Keep the Buick up front. Next to the Ferraris.”

                3. ‘Free’ jazz? On the public’ side dime I’ll wager! Eh, comrade?

            2. I might of mentioned some of my early jobs on my very first resume to show I was responsible enough to have maintained modestly-gainful, semi-skilled employment for a reasonable length of time and cover for a recent large gap spent as a black marketeer and gentleman of leisure, but I didn’t brag about all the value I added applying wax “high-tech polymer paint protection” to new Pontiacs and Isuzus.

              1. SIV|12.29.16 @ 12:03AM|#
                “I might of mentioned some of my early jobs on my very first resume to show I was responsible enough to have……….”

                IOWs, full of shit. Why is that not surprising?

              2. “I might of mentioned some of my early jobs”

                I might of too, in a job that didn’t require literacy.

              3. I was responsible enough to have maintained modestly-gainful, semi-skilled employment for a reasonable length of time and cover for a recent large gap spent as a black marketeer and gentleman of leisure

                Was that before or after you populated a “bill me later” form for a Reason Magazine subscription with fake contact information?

          2. We’ve commented on this before; on graduating from HS, I had a choice: Move out or pay room and board.
            The r/b was not punitive and probably didn’t cover the cost of me living there, but it was obvious that the ‘free’ lunch was a thing of the past.
            And one HS summer, I worked a gov’t (!!!!) road crew swinging scythes to clear the median edges after the mowers went through.
            Turned me into a RINOtarian cuck overnight!

    5. Not sure what the fuck you are trying to say. That resume is better than that of the current POTUS.

      Curious. Describe YOUR resume. No identifying info, as if anyone cares. What leads you to believe you’re above him, and that he deserves your mockery?

      1. Is SIV the lawyer in training that knows everything? I don’t keep track of commenters names as well as I should.

        1. “Bo Cara; esq.” is no longer posting under that name, and appears to have been outed as a Tulpa sock.

        2. SIV’s job is trolling for Trump. He gets a quarter-credit per word for posts defending Trump and/or attacking any pathetic loser who dares criticize Trump – once he gets enough credits he can cash them in for a free pony. (He believes Trump’s claim that it’s a solid-gold stallion, but it’s really just a spray-painted My Little Pony.)

    6. What a fucking moron you are SIV. The SENATE declares war not the House. Or did you just skip the Constitution itself when you decided to prattle on about a House critters foreign policy cred.

      1. The SENATE declares war not the House

        WHY DO YOU THINK THEY CALL IT DOPE?

      2. I thought it was both the house and the senate that had to sign off on declaring war, but we weren’t bothering with that anymore and now we can just get to the Trumpokylipse whenever needed since we have evolved into a pen and a phone Obamacracy.

  6. OT: (Maybe posted already) Super Mario Run’s Not-So-Super Gender Politics

    Unfortunately, despite Nintendo’s history and reputation, Super Mario Run is not a family-friendly game ? or at least not one my wife and I will be letting our 6-year-old daughter play. The game is rife with stale, retrograde gender stereotypes ? elements that were perhaps expected in 1985, when the first Super Mario Bros. was released in the United States, but that today are just embarrassing.

    1. He may have a little too much Uncle Walt in him and not enough Hayao Miyazaki, whose Studio Ghibli movies like “My Neighbor Totoro” and “Spirited Away” are filled with adventurous young heroines.

      Why can’t he be like the other Japanese guy and not be a bigot?

      1. Apparently the only media Japan produces is video games and anime. That’s not conforming to stereotypes or anything.

        Also, what happened to the whole ‘cultural imperialism’ thing? Why is it suddenly acceptable for Western audiences to demand changes that conform to their sensibilities?

        1. Power imbalances? Structural/Institutional racism? I DON’T KNOW! *Runs away sobbing*

    2. Wonder what the guy thinks of poker, with the king scoring higher than the queen?

      1. It’s good ta be the King.

    3. Trying to get the Japanese to confirm to Western social justice politics for games that already sell millions of copies. Good luck with that.

    4. “Sorry Princess, the plumber is in another castle.” Seems like a halfway decent premise for a game.

    5. Super Mario Run is not a family-friendly game ? or at least not one my wife and I will be letting our 6-year-old daughter play.

      Not at all the same thing.

      And it was posted before.

      1. By yours truly, but that’s OK, it deserves to be widely publicized and mocked.

        1. BTW, that Trump American Badass video cracked me up.

          1. Only the best links for the good people at H&R.

            The best.

    6. The game is rife with stale, retrograde gender stereotypes ? elements that were perhaps expected in 1985

      Metroid, with Samus Aran, came out only 1 year later.

      1. There was a Mario game where you could be the princess, which I did, not for the reasons you pervs might think, but because she could jump further.

        1. You conveniently forgot the part about how her skirt lifts up when she jumps Eddie.

          Also, the closest thing to God in the Mario universe is female.

        2. That doesn’t count because in Japan, the game we know as Super Mario Bros. 2 is actually a game called Doki Doki Panic with completely different characters. Kind of how they took 3 completely unrelated anime series and mushed them together to make Robotech for the United States.

          Because gaijin, and their dogs, are dumb.

          1. My dog and I prefer to identify as nanban, thank you very much.

            1. Are you S.E. Asian?

              If so, do you have a Soi Dog?

              1. Nanban’s the old (16th century) Japanese term for European barbarians (back when they thought we came from the south). Gaijin, I believe, is actually technically less offensive because it just means foreigner.

                1. I forgot they use the word differently than the Chinese.

                  1. Somehow I didn’t read your name, and the meme didn’t click, and now I’m the cunt lecturing someone on East Asian societies who knows far more than I do.

                    1. No worries…

                      I was just excited for a moment that someone else here would know first-hand the utter joy a plate of Crying Tiger Steak may bring.

          2. “Because gaijin, and their dogs, are dumb.”

            Remind me whose imperial ambitions ended in mushroom clouds? And not Mario mushrooms, either.

      2. stale, retrograde gender stereotypes ? elements that were perhaps expected in 1985

        yeah, the mid 1980s. When gender stereotypes were like, rigid and stuff.

        1. Forget it, Gilmore, it’s Millennialtown.

        2. expected one of the links to be Boy George.

    1. What a load of bullshit.

      1. My fake news senses were tingling.

      2. I followed the in story link to the report. They are talking about 36 patients. Definitely the next epidemic.

      3. This is probably part of what will be the ongoing excuse to not reschedule pot at the federal level.

    2. They had me going with the “rare adverse reaction” thing, and then they had to throw in this =

      Now all kinds of ambition has come back. I desire so much more in life and, at 37 years old, it’s a little late to do it, but better now than never,”he said.

      Millions and millions of people have been smoking this shit perpetually for the better part of a century, but suddenly a few legalized states are discovering ‘mysterious side effects’? I’m not impressed.

      I think there probably are some medical side effects to heavy, constant use. That would be true with anything. but i doubt they’re very mysterious. Some hippy i knew had problems with their eyes which a doctor later attributed to his excessive bong-hittage. and this girl? I don’t know what her problems are going to be, but she will likely be Patient Zero for something weed-related.

      1. I worked at a Cannabis Cup one time and by the end I didn’t want to deal with extreme stoners for quite a while.

        1. I talked to someone who was very stoned this afternoon, and it was sort of like talking to someone who is very drunk, just a little less obnoxious and more silly. I’m just not so used to it anymore. Most people I talk to these days handle their substance abuse very well, to the point that you wouldn’t even know they’re under the influence of anything.

      2. Interesting contraption the young lady had there, other than the mouth of water risk. But once she started her story, well, no.

  7. “Lacking Venezuela’s aid, Cuban economy shrinks for first time in 23 years”
    http://www.foxnews.com/world/2…..years.html

    Note the source; FOX is not going to be sympathetic to thug Castro or thug Maduro et al, but HIH did anyone come up with data which could even *hint* at the direction of the Cuban economy?
    Wiki:
    “Most Cuban state workers receive their wages in national pesos, but some receive a portion of their salary in convertible pesos. Shops that sell basics like fruit and vegetables generally accept only the normal peso. “Dollar shops” sell the rest. The word “pesos” may refer to both types of money.
    Cuban convertible pesos are 25 times more valuable, but that does not completely eliminate the confusion for tourists. Since goods bought in national pesos have government-controlled prices, tourists are sometimes confused by prices that look “too cheap.” The hard (CUC) pesos are easy to tell apart from the national (CUP) ones, as CUC coins have an octagonal shape within the outer round rim. Also, CUC currency shows monuments, and CUP bills have portraits.”
    And on Wednesdays after a full moon, the Peso with funny numbers is….
    So I’m calling BS on any claim that the Cuban economy is doing other than allowing some Cubans a subsistence market existence, a bunch of lazy ones rations enough to kick the kid into the street to turn tricks and the Castros swimming pools full of gelt.

    1. And, no, Wiki; I’m not contributing.
      Sell some ads; I can tell if you’ve been co-opted.
      You, too Mozilla; screw your ‘purity’.

      1. Private group asking for private donations. Contribute or not, there’s no government gun forcing you to.

    2. HIH did anyone come up with data which could even *hint* at the direction of the Cuban economy?

      I presume they get all sorts of cheap loans from the world-bank, and so have to report basic macro stuff. its not exactly north-korea-level isolated, so there’s proxy data you can use to sanity-check claims like that.

      1. You use “sanity-check” and that’s not a bad starting point. Are you comfortable with “order of magnitude” WRT the Cuban economy?
        No sarc, real question.

        1. my experience with macro analysis is pretty superficial.

          all this data here is from the World bank/or is just claims made by their own national statistics agency. =

          http://www.tradingeconomics.com/cuba/indicators

          i’d presume there’s an analyst somewhere who bothers to vet this stuff and validate it. I mean even if they’re not a member of the IMF, *someone’s* loaning them money for trade reasons.I’d assume that because VZ was such a crucial relationship that they’ve suffered in parallel with the declines in that economy.

          I’d also assume that they have a pretty simple-to-analyze economy. very few basic exports, etc. and with visibility of commodity prices, you can come up with simple estimates.

          Do i think its off by orders of magnitude? unlikely. Countries do monkey with official stats, but there’s only so far you can sandbag your #s before the utility of doing so declines to nil.

          1. “I’d also assume that they have a pretty simple-to-analyze economy. very few basic exports, etc. and with visibility of commodity prices, you can come up with simple estimates.”

            OK, that give a hint of validity to the claims, but not much. Those folks don’t have any skin in the game and the ones that do are likely driven by political incentives.
            I’ve yet to see claim of a recent shrinkage after a longer growth supported by any market (vs. ‘political’) indicators.
            And it doesn’t help that the sugar Cuba might export is nationally subsidized most everywhere in the ‘free’ world.

  8. Looks like that kid should be working at foot locker. Good luck to him anyways. Shit that’s what Richard Cordray looked like when he first ran for office. I met him when he was out canvassing my parents neighborhood. Now he runs one of the most powerful departments in the Country.

    1. He looks like he might get a guest spot on The Big Bang Theory or whatever else new nerdy sitcom is out.

  9. . . . sole sitting federal House member. . . .

    What does this mean? I’m assuming it means he’s the only member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Montana. But ‘sole sitting’? They only have *one*. Its not like there are empty seats that are waiting to be filled.

    1. Not many folks there. One Rep as far as I know. Rep’s are based on population. I am sure most Montanan’s would vote to have Rep’s based on fish count.

      1. Or, I may have not understood what you were saying. So disregard what I said.

        1. No, I get that. Its just the way he’s writing it implies that there are other seats to be filled – there aren’t.

  10. Seeing as he has had a job cleaning the pool and taking out the trash he is more qualified to hold office than the majority of those clowns.

    1. One would think that the best qualification would be a thorough understanding, respect for, and willingness to uphold the US Constitution. Instead, that’s likely to get you laughed out of DC these days. And that will continue until those laughing start to show up around town hanging from lampposts.

      1. The most likely way we would ever see anything close to a libertarian moment would be if there were a bottom up seismic shift in the culture. I think it is ridiculous that socialism still holds so much popular sway. There seems to be tremendous opportunities for libertarians to make inroads in the popular culture to move more people towards the radical idea to leave people the fuck alone and stop trying to control their personal, non violent choices.

      2. Lampposts only work until the body starts falling apart. To really keep the bureaucrats in line you need gibbets lining Pennsylvania avenue.

      1. Ha! Thanks. I had fun with it as well.

        Well

        1. Very funny.

    1. Those things do wonders for the taste of draft Milwaukee’s Best.

      1. In my opinion, the one thing that does wonders for the taste of *any* shitty beer is drinking the beer before the current one.

        The more you drink, the better they taste.

  11. OT: Attention SF area Reasonoids! We are having a meetup this Friday evening in SF. Email me at my handle @ gmail.com for details.

  12. Yesterday the Western Church observes the Feast of the Holy Innocents. Today the Byzantines observe it.

    Matthew 2:12-18 – TL;DR, King Herod kills the children under 2 in an unsuccessful attempt to destroy Jesus.

    So here’s Michael Haydn’s setting of Salvete Flores Martyrum, a hymn for this feast.

  13. What an unfortunate surname in these days of trumped up Red Scare hysteria renewal.

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