Police Abuse

When Police Abuse Is 'Normal'

A new documentary on militarized police focuses on mundane, everyday, "legitimate" abuses.

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Vanish Films

I haven't seen the new documentary Do Not Resist, but Radley Balko's review at The Washington Post makes it sound like a must-watch. According to Balko, the movie avoids the sort of footage that usually dominates discussions of abusive policing: You don't see anyone killed, you don't see anyone beaten, you don't see a SWAT team storming the wrong address. "What makes this movie so powerful," he writes, "is its terrifying portrayal of the mundanities of modern policing."

It's one thing to read about a "dynamic entry" drug raid in which the police mistakenly or intentionally kill someone, or in which someone mistakenly or intentionally kills a police officer. It's awful and tragic and unnecessary. "Do Not Resist" doesn't show one of those. It instead shows the sort of drug raid that's far more common. The movie depicts the raid from the beginning, as the officers from the Richland County Sheriff's Department tactical team are meeting to discuss strategy. Some are wearing T-shirts with the tactical team's logo. It's a human skull imposed over two crossed AR-15s.

There are no children at the residence, the lead officer assures his colleagues. (There were.) There would be a significant quantity of illegal drugs at the house, another says. (There weren't.) The tactical team then proceeds to raid the home of a black family in Richland County. Most officers storm the front door with their guns while one shatters some side windows as a distraction. Minutes go by. The officers' body language eventually shows signs of frustration as their search for contraband continues to come up empty. Finally, someone finds a book bag with traces of marijuana at the bottom—not enough to smoke, much less sell. They arrest a young black man with long braids for possession….

[The arrestee] runs a landscaping company to help pay for his education. The man later tells the officer that he was on his way to pick up some lawnmowers that morning. Knowing that he's about to be arrested, he asks the officer if he could tell his employee that he was arrested and won't be able to pick up the lawnmowers. He then gives the officer $876 in cash and asks it to give it to his employee to go pick up the mowers, along with a weed-eater.

Instead, the officer confiscates the money under civil asset forfeiture laws.

The rest of the review is here, and a trailer is below:

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  1. I posted this in the lynx the other day, but it’s the most WTF part of the review:

    Fittingly, the most chilling scene in the movie doesn’t take place on a city street, or at a protest, or during a drug raid. It takes place in a conference room. It’s from a police training conference with Dave Grossman, one of the most prolific police trainers in the country. Grossman’s classes teach officers to be less hesitant to use lethal force, urge them to be willing to do it more quickly and teach them how to adopt the mentality of a warrior.

    […]

    In the class recorded for “Do Not Resist,” Grossman at one point tells his students that the sex they have after they kill another human being will be the best sex of their lives. The room chuckles. But he’s clearly serious. “Both partners are very invested in some very intense sex,” he says. “There’s not a whole lot of perks that come with this job. You find one, relax and enjoy it.”

    Grossman closes the class with a (literal) chest-pounding motivational speech that climaxes with Grossman telling the officers to find an overpass overlooking the city they serve. He urges them to look down on their city and know that they’ve made the world a better place. He then urges them to grip the overpass railing, lean forward and “let your cape blow in the wind.” The room gives him a standing ovation.

    1. “There’s not a whole lot of perks that come with this job. You find one, relax and enjoy it.”

      Anyone have cops on their Derpbook? This is exactly how they see themselves. My recent favorite: “I hunt the evil that you pretend doesn’t exist.”

      1. “You want me flashbanging infants in cribs, you need me shooting hapless bystanders.”

        1. I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom I provide, then questions the manner in which I provide it! I’d rather you just said thank you and went on your way. Otherwise, I suggest you pick up a flashbang and maim an infant. Either way, I don’t give a damn what you think you’re entitled to!

          1. Did you order the Code Maimed Infant?!

      2. Then how come you haven’t killed any cops yet?

    2. Jesus H. Christ….cops getting sexually aroused by committing violence….that’s real ?!

      1. Part of the ancient warrior ethos, so too is the pillaging – er I mean forfeiture – for that matter.

        Yeah this warrior cop stuff makes a lot of sense.

    3. Y’know, I read Lt Col Grossman’s On Killing and I thought it was a pretty good book, as books go. It seemed pretty well researched and drew reasonable conclusions from the information presented. For a young soldier it was (and remains) an excellent resource for learning what to expect in combat and the aftermath of making what is often a very difficult decision.

      What I learned from On Killing was that killing does not come naturally to your average combatant, that there are significant psychological costs associated with the decision to kill (unless you’re a sociopath), and that the humane treatment of POWs and other noncombatants is paramount even under the stress of a warzone. I admired Grossman for his work.

      But what the fuck is he doing here. Cops aren’t soldiers. They’re cops. And a man as learned as he is should know better, Ranger or not. Had he stuck to imparting his wisdom on Army recruits, I doubt I’d have batted an eyelash. But this is simply appalling.

      1. He’s overcome those psychological costs.

        1. The irony is Grossman has never killed. It’s almost as if his fascination with human nature and killing has turned into a fetish. I just bought the book about a week ago and hadn’t really dug into it yet. Unfortunately now I’ll be approaching it completely differently.

  2. No thanks. I’m sure it is excellent, but my heart is probably not in any shape for the stress.

    1. I know I should watch it. I feel it’s probably deserving of all kinds of praise.

      But at the same time, my blood pressure went up just watching the trailer. A couple hours of that would kill me.

  3. NUT-PUNCH: THE MOVIE
    Now in Imax 4-D, With Hypersonic-Nut-Assault Seating Technology

    1. ^^THIS

    2. All that high-tech stuff, jeesh! Just stuff a baby allifator down the front of your pants upon entering the theater.

      1. Gotta be a euphemism.

    3. William Castle would’ve called the seat gimmicks something like Rack-O

  4. I got an ache in my tenderness just from reading excerpts of the review. Looks like a good movie, but i’ll pass until i’m sure i don’t want any more kids.

  5. Yup, a life destroyed over ” a book bag with traces of marijuana at the bottom?not enough to smoke, much less sell.”

    For great justice!

    I despise humanity.

    1. [The arrestee] runs a landscaping company to help pay for his education. The man later tells the officer that he was on his way to pick up some lawnmowers that morning. Knowing that he’s about to be arrested, he asks the officer if he could tell his employee that he was arrested and won’t be able to pick up the lawnmowers. He then gives the officer $876 in cash and asks it to give it to his employee to go pick up the mowers, along with a weed-eater.

      Instead, the officer confiscates the money under civil asset forfeiture laws.

      HERO! He must be so proud of his work that day!

      1. I am sure that if you asked him, he’d say it’s just the job. I bet deep down inside, if you actually got him relaxed and off guard, he might even say he thinks it was wrong, in some sense. But because it’s the law and he doesn’t get to pick and choose which laws he enforces, he must do it.

        What I can’t imagine is knowing that, even in some very deep very hidden manner, how cops still execute the job and the stupid orders and the stupid laws. It’s got to bury your conscience so deep it will never surface again.

        That’s what I imagine differentiates the mythical good cops from the bad cops: the mythical good cops still have that conscience somewhere, buried so deep it hardly ever twitches. The bad cops revel in having no conscience.

        1. I should have made it clear — I am positive he rejoices with his friends, brags about it, even has a lot of good laughs.

          1. “The scumbag actually gave me the $876 with some bullshit lawnmower story. POS deserved to lose his money.”

      2. USA! USA! USA!

      3. He must be so proud of his work that day!

        Yes, yes he is. I hope every narcotics and SWAT cop in this country gets fucking Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

        1. Karma is a bitch.

    2. That’s racist against humanity. Just stick to hating cops.

  6. Also don’t know if covered, but oddly self-aware NYT’s story (granted, I only read the first few paragraphs – there’s probably some scaremongering later): Spaniards, Exhausted by Politics, Warm to Life Without a Government

    “No government, no thieves,” said F?lix Pastor, a language teacher who, like many voters, is fed up with the corruption and scandals that tarnished the two previous governing parties.

    Mr. Pastor, a wiry, animated 59-year-old, said Spain could last without a government “until hell freezes over” because politicians were in no position to do more harm.

    1. oddly self-aware NYT’s story

      That’s only because they’ve had corrupt politicians in power, like Republicans here at home, and they’d surely vote in pure-hearted Democrat-like politicians if they had a chance.

    2. I missed the “Self-Aware” bits. If they’d drawn parallels the US frothing about the current election, and suggested “maybe we’d be better of without TOP PEOPLE”…. i missed it.

      Still, yes, this sort of thing is so rare at the NYT as to be nearly unbelievable. Normally they’re the one’s screaming that the sky will fall without a Federal Administration of Atmospheric Elevation Enforcement

      1. Well, this at least in my mind is a counterpoint to the stupid “What about Australia” gun control crowing.

        Now you have a place to point to, a place progressives insist is superior to the US, and it has no real government running things, and they’re fine.

        1. As somebody pointed out in the links this morning, what Spain has is a massive national bureaucracy that’s chugging along just fine. There aren’t actual politicians hanging out and performing the service of being the accountable faces of the government, but to say that there isn’t a government at all is pretty misleading.

          1. It’s “government” in the parliamentary sense of having a party or coalition who is in charge. Which I guess people like to conflate with having a government at all.

          2. As a talking point, “Spain has no government” has as much truth as the nonsense spewed about Australia.

          3. to say that there isn’t a government at all is pretty misleading.

            Yes. But it still provides a great example of how the “Leadership fetish” of the progressive & conservative set is complete bullshit.

            and that the frothing about the DOOOM which will ensure if the wrong president is elected is nonsense = 95% of the government is on cruise control, and we could go without a president indefinitely and hardly see any change in our lives.

            At the very least it gives people an example that shows that “More govt” isn’t always a solution – and that often, the less of it, the better.

          4. what Spain has is a massive national bureaucracy that’s chugging along just fine.

            Although not having a parliament passing additional laws is a definite plus.

    3. I read that also. So Spain will soon be Somalia?

      1. No, but last I checked Spain was also broke as fuck due to the way their government spends money. I don’t buy this line of reasoning at all. They’re a bunch of socialists. The idea they ‘don’t have government’ is plain jane bullshit. If anything it’s just an admission that their law enforcement is corrupt enough to take bribes on a regular basis.

  7. And lets just point out the illegality of seizing the money. The only justification for that is if its the proceeds of selling pot. They have zero evidence that any pot was sold, and no basis for charging the defendant with distribution or sale.

    1. When the president does police do it, that means that it is not illegal .

    2. The charges will probably be dropped.
      But the police can chalk up a raid w/ an arrest on their yearly stats.

      And the cops will keep the money.

      Not going to see this. I’ve had a dozen “ordinary” interactions with the Cops in my 50+ years and know all about the thuggery …and how the ‘good’ cops and their fans in the public and enablers in the courthouses and mayors’ offices cheer it all on.
      Nope
      Nope
      Nope

      1. By not seeing the movie, you are micro-invalidating the awareness of … something something.

        1. It’s not something that libertarians need to see. We’re already well informed about this stuff. It’s pretty much everyone else in the country that need to see it.

    3. The New Professionalism

  8. The logic of broken windows policing applies to police misconduct as well. If your plan to do something about police misconduct is to go crazy over every police shooting, you don’t have a plan. Shootings don’t just happen out of the blue. The unjustified ones are the result of an overall police culture of poor training and lack of accountability. And that culture does not arise from the shootings. The culture is created by an environment were low level misconduct is tolerated.

    This has three effects. The first and most obvious is that it causes cops to rationally figure they can get away with anything and for some cops anything including shooting someone. Second, since there are no stakes to doing their jobs well, it causes cops to not take training very seriously. .

    1. I don’t think the cops doing these shootings are psycho killers. I think they are more than anything poorly trained and terrified. You don’t shoot someone because you are a sadist. Shooting someone is a lot of hassle. The real sadist cops are shooting people. They are beating the shit out of them and doing other things that they know won’t get a lot of attention. The cops who are shooting are shooting because they are terrified. They are terrified because they are poorly trained. They are poorly trained because since there is no accountability, there is no benefit to being well trained.

      Lastly, the lack of accountability destroys the department’s credibility with the public such that once there is a shooting, no one is going to believe the department’s version of it or accept anything other than prosecution no matter what the truth. If the pubic can’t expect cops to be held accountable for small things, they will never believe it when a department claims they will hold them accountable for big things

      1. Shooting someone is a lot of hassle.

        Yeah, the paid vacations, the cushy desk duty, the meetings with the union, even, worst case scenario, the back pay – what a hassle.

        I get your point, John. I’m sure its annoying for cops to do the rituals needed to get off on a bad shoot. But its probably worth it, to have the best sex of your life, amirite?

        You are bang on point that this is a much deeper problem with the endless petty abuses and oppositional culture of cops these days.

        The cops who are shooting are shooting because they are terrified.

        Sometimes, no question. Not always, though. Listen to the audio of the cops trying to run over the homeless guy, and then mag dumping into him. They don’t sound terrified to me.

        1. Or the couple musclehead douchebag murderers in Albuquerque who were caught on tape on their way to murdering James Boyd admitting that they would murder him.

        2. paid vacations, cushy desk duty, meetings with the union, back pay –

          All that and sometimes you get a medal and commendation…maybe even officer of the year.

        3. Paid vacation sitting around hoping they don’t indict you for murder or a mob shows up and tries to burn down the town as a result of you not being indicted. If you think cops are running around thinking it is just no big deal and a good thing to have to shoot someone, you are woefully mistaken RC. If they thought that, a hell of a lot more people would be getting shot than are.

          1. Paid vacation sitting around hoping they don’t indict you for murder or a mob shows up and tries to burn down the town as a result of you not being indicted.

            They’re probably more worried about being struck by lightning.

          2. Reveal preference. Those things must not be too bad or they would stop shooting unarmed people in order to avoid them.

            1. Once again, if that were true, there would be tens fo thousands of shootings in this country every year not the 600 or whatever there actually are. There are over a million cops in this country. If they all thought it was okay or just not a big deal to shoot people, they would shoot a hell of a lot more than 600 people every year.

              You guys don’t help by being so irrational about this shit and making crazy claims. It really doesn’t’ help.

              1. It’s not about them being crazed killers. That’s just a strawman. It’s about their indifference to lives of the people they are supposed to be serving and protecting. 600 are killed, but how many more are beaten beyond what is required to subdue them or tased into compliance?

                They just don’t give a shit about the misery they inflict and there obviously aren’t punishments in place in order to make them give a shit.

              2. there would be tens fo thousands of shootings in this country every year not the 600 or whatever there actually are.

                I think its north of 1,000. Hard to say, because they also aren’t responsible for reporting their kills.

              3. There are over a million cops in this country.

                20 years ago there were only 800,000.

                So we’re lucky that 98% of them are lazy?

      2. I think they are more than anything poorly trained and terrified.

        See: Betty Shelby, who I hope spends several years in a federal penitentiary.

      3. Poorly trained?
        Or well trained in all the wrong things?

        1. Or well trained in all the wrong things?

          From Balko’s review:

          Fittingly, the most chilling scene in the movie doesn’t take place on a city street, or at a protest, or during a drug raid. It takes place in a conference room. It’s from a police training conference with Dave Grossman, one of the most prolific police trainers in the country. Grossman’s classes teach officers to be less hesitant to use lethal force, urge them to be willing to do it more quickly and teach them how to adopt the mentality of a warrior.

          So yeah, they’re probably very well trained, it’s just that they’re being trained to be “warriors” as opposed to “peace officers.”

      4. You don’t shoot someone JUST because you are a sadist.

        FTFY

      5. I don’t think the cops doing these shootings are psycho killers. I think they are more than anything poorly trained and terrified.

        They’re not poorly trained. They’re wrongly trained. They’re not terrified. They just don’t give a shit about your life.

        This quote from Balko’s review sums it up nicely.

        “I never one time said you’re a bad person,” the lead officer tells his arrestee, with an odd cordiality. “I just have a job to do, and you happen to be in the middle of it.”

    2. The culture is created by an environment were low level misconduct is tolerated.

      I believe it is sarcasmic who likes to point out that breaking the law is one of the perks of being in law enforcement, like free meals are for restaurant workers. You can break traffic laws with impunity, including drunk driving. Lying on reports. Perjury.

      If you’ve ever worked in a company with a toxic culture, you know how the bad behaviour drives out the good. You also know that toxic cultures are almost impossible to fix; you usually have to purge all the old guard to effect real change.

  9. I’m unbelievably gratified at what (from what i can tell at least) seems to be a film focusing on *Militarized Enforcement* writ-large as the problem being addressed, and not some boogeyman of “Racism” …. which tends to ignore the problems inherent in the institution itself, and instead pretends that the institution is merely being misguided by race-animus. As if they’d be just fine without that icky-racial stuff.

    And i hope that it gets the sort of traction other docos have been able to get in highlighting institutional-problems; they tend to be seen by far more people than would otherwise read a book about a topic, and help “frame” issues in ways that can help people appreciate the complex nature of how these things come to be without bogging them down in academic analysis.

    I do expect (and fear) that there will be at least a few reviewers who decide, “the good work it does”-aside, that it is fundamentally flawed for its “failure” to make it into a non-stop weep/moan about police shootings of unarmed blacks. Basically, a criticism that its “not the movie they want to see”. Its still probably the film people need to see.

    1. Agreed. If your goal was to make police reform impossible, you couldn’t have designed a better tactic than #BlackLivesMatter.

    2. they tend to be seen by far more people than would otherwise read a book about a topic

      It’s one thing to read “Grossman at one point tells his students that the sex they have after they kill another human being will be the best sex of their lives” and it’s another to actually hear him say it, no matter how many adjectives like “nonchalantly” or “callously” you toss in.

  10. Man I wish the revolution would happen during my lifetime but…. Still too many “REEEEE Cops are heroes!” types out there. But it’s coming and my soul will look down upon it and smile.

    1. Agree there are still too many, “how DARE you criticize our heros in blue” types.

      1. I often wonder what it would be like to see the world as a Norman Rockwell painting.

  11. a must-watch.

    Assuming you already own a steel cup.

  12. I think I need to disconnect. Society is too dispiriting, and destructive for my psyche.

    1. “Turn on, tune in, drop out”

      1. Doesn’t work. Next…

    2. I keep thinking that. And keep getting sucked back in.

      If H&R weren’t so entertaining, I’d probably have more success.

  13. Once again, I blame TV. Prime time is a nightly 3 hours of pro-government, pro-police propaganda.

    My wife always watches the police procedurals. Last night two cops want to search a mini-warehouse storage unit, and the manager asks for a warrant. The cops start sniffing, “I smell a meth lab”, so the manager relents and the two cops make some snarky comments and roll their eyes. Yeah, fuck that asshole and his 4th Amendment.

    That show was followed by Madam Secretary, at which point I left the room rather than risk an aneurysm.

    1. You are correct. My wife watches those shows. Cops are heroes, noble lovable characters just out to do the right thing. That shit is being pumped into the culture 24 hours a day on countless channels.

    2. My significant other is also addicted to police procedurals, and I’ve made it tolerable for myself by pointing out flagrant abuses of police power and misconduct while she watches. I’m sure it’s probably irritating to her, but in every episode there’s that moment where the ‘good guys in blue’ need to find a way to violate someone’s rights to ‘catch the bad guy’.

      Pretty much the entire genre can’t seem to survive without painting the police as perfect models of propriety who only violate the letter of the law because they just care so much that they can’t let those people that they know are guilty escape the law, which is always insufficient. (In my opinion, Law & Order SUV is probably the best example of these tropes.)

      That being said, it’s entertainment and there aren’t a lot of things more boring than watching a show about slow moving bureaucracy so I understand where the producers are coming from. I could just as easily point to every buddy cop movie ever made on how we need police ignoring orders and the law to blow up some guys house that they’re pretty sure sells drugs or something. I try not to get too ‘tin foil hat’ about these shows though. What they’re doing gets ratings, so of course that’s what they’re going to do.

      1. I despise police procedurals. Almost as much as I despise televised politics coverage,

        1. People like predictable content that makes them feel smart, hence police procedurals. If you can’t guess who done it within the first 5-10 minutes, you’re probably having a stroke and should seek help. This isn’t always the case, but the formula works so I’m not going to knock it. It’s been in vogue for easily over a hundred years as a genre.

          1. People like predictable content

            Especially when there are “good guys and bad guys.” I think it is that simple.

            Gibbs = good, terrorists and murderers = bad.

      2. You two should totally watch “The Shield”. Its a bit old, but seems more in-line with how things actually work.

  14. He then gives the officer $876 in cash and asks it to give it to his employee to go pick up the mowers, along with a weed-eater.

    Instead, the officer confiscates the money under civil asset forfeiture laws.

    Ka-pow!

    I take it the SWAT roidheads were not aware of the type of documentary they were showing off to.

    1. Or they were oblivious, which makes sense considering they live in their made up world of good vs evil.

      1. Watcha, watcha ya gonna do…

      2. Or they were restraining themselves!

  15. When the shit hits the fan, like it did in Orlando, these heroes will congregate outside for a few hours until they absolutely have to actually save lives.

    1. Too busy laying their lives on the line every day, to go into real danger!

    2. When the shit hits the fan, like it did in Orlando, these heroes will congregate outside for a few hours until they absolutely have to actually save lives.

      I agree that their bluster about “risking their lives every day” is often undermined by the way they’ll basically hide behind bulletproof-shields and use a dozen armed officers to deal with what are often unarmed crazy people…

      … i’m not sure the Orlando thing was 100% a case of “local cops being pussies”; there’s certainly some evidence that they bungled the immediate response, having first secured the club area, then retreating, leaving dozens of people in a position to be made hostages/victims…. but from the limited info that leaked out, it was unclear if they retreated on their own, or if they were ordered to by competing agencies. It sounded like maybe the first-reponders got over-ridden by the SWAT cops, who were then delayed by FBI or others, and no one ended up making a decision about what to do

      i’m not disagreeing w. your sentiment, i’m just unsure what the nature of their fuckup really was. Which is why i think the FBI purposely put a gag-order on all local-agency reporting about the aftermath. No one knows exactly who made decisions about what, at what time…. and they want to keep it that way. I imagine there was more than 1 really stupid call made, and that everyone has mutually agreed to stonewall about the subject for their own respective self-interests.

      1. There was an active shooting in progress and they did not immediately engage the shooter.

      2. There were wounded people in the club with their cell phones, begging for rescue.

        The dispatchers were listening to them bleed out and die.

        The cops just sat nice and snug outside, while people died.

        Fuck the Orlando police pussies.

        1. This as well. Why have a SWAT team, with all the gear and training, if they do not put themselves at risk by breaching the building as soon as possible?

          1. Exactly. That situation is the very situation the whole concept of Special Weapons and Tactics was created.

            And instead they sat outside for hours.

            1. The profound ignorance of you people is astounding.

            2. Columbine was the same. Had police never shown up at least one teacher would still be alive.

  16. He then gives the officer $876 in cash and asks it to give it to his employee to go pick up the mowers, along with a weed-eater.

    Instead, the officer confiscates the money under civil asset forfeiture laws.

    I wonder why he thought it would play out in other way.

    1. He was naive enough to think that if he showed good faith and acted like an innocent man the cops would take that into account. He doesnt understand that they don’t give a shit one way or the other if you are actually innocent. They have a pretense for taking your money, they take it.

      1. Yes, because it is the police who pass these asset forfeiture laws.
        God, you people are stupid!

        1. They’re just following orders!

        2. Who do you think came up with this shit show to begin with?

        3. Was his $876 an asset that needed to be forfeited? And WE’RE the stupid ones?

  17. You know, it doesn’t bother that young men who train for dangerous jobs get the adrenaline rush before finally getting to use their training in combat. Like a SEAL making his first real combat dive. But, then again when there is the real threat of danger, guys aren’t just giddy either.

    The thing that bothers me is that the kids AREN’T fucking warriors. They know that in all likelihood they will completely outgun whatever they run into. They know there isn’t any significant chance of dying on some drug raid. So they are high on the excitement of power. And the adrenaline rush of a roller coaster. And they know if they fuck up, and some civilian gets hurt, his buddies have his back.

    A group of men who aspire to act like warriors, without earning it, and without developing a true warrior ethos, are nothing but groups of ravaging thugs. Bulletproof warrior my ass. The whole fucking point is that humans AREN’T bulletproof. And it is the courage of going against an enemy that could very well kill you that earns someone a spot in Valhalla. Not raiding families with overwhelming force because someone may have some of the wrong kind of psychoactive plant in their possession.

    1. Indeed. What you describe is what separates warriors from mere brigands.

    2. Well said, Odinson, These geared-up bullies are about as far from Einherjar as men could be.

    3. You’re 100% right. It’s real easy to get amped up and excited about that first time going into a situation where you know you have overwhelming force and the entirety of the legal system behind you willing to overlook any mistakes. Dynamically entering a house in Sadr City because it’s suspect some High Value bomb-maker lives there is one thing. Raiding some suburban house at breakfast time doesn’t strike me as the same thing.

    4. I’ll bet you rooted against John Wayne.

  18. The eventual destination of all law enforcement organizations is to become a blatant criminal organization. We are starting to reach that phase on a nationwide basis.

  19. Just found out it’s playing Thursday at 7 pm near me (AFI Silver Theater in Silver Spring, MD), but it doesn’t look like tickets are for sale on the website. That’s odd.

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