Edward Snowden

European Parliament Wants to Give Snowden Sanctuary

Nonbinding vote urges member states to let the whistleblower in.

|

Today the parliament of the European Union voted narrowly—285 to 281—to urge its member states to give sanctuary to Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor whose leaks shed light on the U.S. government's covert surveillance programs. Specifically, the resolution said Europe should "drop any criminal charges against Edward Snowden, grant him protection and consequently prevent extradition or rendition by third parties, in recognition of his status as whistle-blower and international human rights defender." Snowden is currently exiled in Russia.

The resolution isn't binding, so Snowden can't simply fly from Moscow to Copenhagen tomorrow. It's possible that no nations at all will embrace the parliament's proposal. But it sure looks like a good sign for Snowden, and that's certainly how he's taking it:

Advertisement

NEXT: The Jeb Bush Doomsayers Become Jeb Bush Doomshouters

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Let me guess – the Obama administration will oppose this initiative, and then turn around to criticize Snowden for living in Russia.

    1. Followed by calls from Clinton to prosecute him. Snowden must really be sweating a GOP president that puts Christie in as AG.

      1. I just threw up in my mouth a little.

        1. So did I! Tastes like custard!

          /Chris Christie

      2. Christie as AG…what a disturbing thought.

  2. Snowden retiring to some friendly European country has “international incident” written all over it.

    1. Yeah. It would be a lot easier for the feds to kidnap him from an European country than Russia.

      1. Or simply pressure the government harboring him to renege on their quaint little agreement with Snowden. And even if they don’t, he’ll be a bargaining chip for whichever country takes him in. The host country may want to buy some good will or pay back a favor to the US. At that point they’ll SWAT him and have him delivered to the US embassy bound to a spit with an apple in his mouth.

        1. If they actually offer him sanctuary openly they will be under immense pressure from their population and their own egos not to hand him over to the US. Getting to be the David to the big bad US Goliath is a popular idea in Europe. There is a general feeling that our position in the world is unearned and that their countries are just as important as our own. It really pisses Europeans off that reality won’t conform to that viewpoint.

          1. It really pisses Europeans off that reality won’t conform to that viewpoint.

            That could be said about many aspects of the European worldview, not just their attitude towards us. They probably hate Reality more than a celebutard on twitter #CompletelyShamelessAmerica

          2. There is a general feeling that our position in the world is unearned and that their countries are just as important as our own.

            Maybe if they hadn’t deviated so far from the things that have historically made European civilization great they’d be right. Unfortunately for them, the US has in some certain respects, retained more of the political philosophy and economic thought that was worth keeping while being relatively conservative in it’s acceptance of deviations from that tradition.

  3. I would advise Mr. Snowden NOT to test that assumption too quickly.

    1. And with narrowed eyes.

  4. Money Quote: The resolution isn’t binding, so Snowden can’t simply fly from Moscow to Copenhagen tomorrow. It’s possible that no nations at all will embrace the parliament’s proposal.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.