Ohio

Read This Chart About Job Recovery, Millennials, and Despair! Especially in Ohio!

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Opportunity Ohio

The chart above is about the Buckeye State, a.k.a. "the Heart of It All," a.k.a. Ohio.

But the general trend lines reflect past, present, and future realities in many parts of the country beyond the old industrial Midwest. Even after the big boom of the '90s went bust, Ohio never climbed back upwards in terms of jobs. It's been a long, bad job market dating back to the early Aughts.

The group behind the chart, Opportunity Ohio (check out its Facebook page, where most of its action seems to reside), is headed up by Matt Mayer, a former muckety-muck at the Department of Homeland Security and head of Ohio's free-market Buckeye Institute

Opportunity Ohio points out that

Right-to-work states dominate the economic recovery. Nine of the 12 top growth states protect workers' right to choose whether or not to join a union. Conversely, 11 out of the 12 worst growth states have forced unionization. The one exception is Michigan, which became a right-to-work state in 2012.

If recovery is partly (or largely) a function of responding to changed circumstances, the argument goes, jurisdictions with more labor-market flexibility are going to adapt more quickly. Millennials, who have higher than average unemployment and are staring down the barrel of a crap economy for years to come, should especially be interested in learning that lesson. In the name of fairness, compassaion, and all sorts of shiny, glittering abstractions, they are entering (or more precisely, not entering) a labor market that is increasingly constrained by all sorts of policies. That's not a recipe for economic growth and long-term income gains.

I highly recommend Mayer's 2012 book, Taxpayers Don't Stand a Chance, an excellent primer based on his experiences with local, state, and federal governments and the structural difficulties in actually constrating the size, scope, and spending of government. It makes for depressing reading, yes, but illuminates the dynamics at work and even suggests credible ways to limit government.

Back in 2011, Reason TV interviewed Mayer, who was unsparing in his criticism of Republican Gov. John Kasich's budget. Take a look:

NEXT: Is the IRS Imposing "Voluntary" Continuing-Education Requirements for Tax Preparers?

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  1. Nine of the 12 top growth states protect workers’ right to choose whether or not to join a union. Conversely, 11 out of the 12 worst growth states have forced unionization.

    Let’s level the playing field, then. Get rid of those right to work laws.

    1. Don’t laugh. I’ve heard proglodytes argue as much.

    2. To be honest, I can’t be a huge fan of right to work laws. Yes, laws are often titled far too much in favor of unions, but an employer should still be able to have a closed shop if he wants to (i.e. is an idiot).

      1. Why should an employer be able to dictate how employees spend their pay and who the associate with when not working?

        1. Drake|5.22.14 @ 11:00AM|#
          “Why should an employer be able to dictate how employees spend their pay and who the associate with when not working?”

          Because they can write any employment contract they wish and if no one likes it, they won’t have employees?
          IOWs, why not?

          1. If he only wants to hire people in a union, fine. If he only wants to hire people in the Stone Masons, fine. If he only wants to hire people in the Spiderman Fan Club, fine.

            Though I suspect it won’t be good for his business, that’s his call.

            1. Exactly; the employer is not “dictating” in any sense at all. He’s looking for employees with X qualifications, regardless of whether a 3rd party sees those as valid or not.

        2. BTW, just to be clear, while I find A D’s argument to be valid, I do not find it persuasive.
          If we have to choose between coerced union membership and “right to work”, r-t-w wins hands down.

          1. That’s why I said “huge fan”. I do think it’s better than a lot of the status quo.

  2. Is anyone here from Ohio? Perhaps you can fill us in on something I’ve wondered about. Kasich came in as governor in 2010 with a 49-47 win. Then his collective bargaining proposal got destroyed at the polls. But now he’s leading double digits on his way to an easy re-election. What happened to turn things around for him?

    1. Incumbency.

    2. One look at his Democrat opponents.

  3. …the structural difficulties in actually constrating the size, scope, and spending of government.

    c?nstr?te: vocative masculine singular of c?nstr?tus

    c?nstr?tus m (feminine c?nstr?ta, neuter c?nstr?tum); first/second declension: strewn, having been strewn; thatched, having been thatched

    Is HnR going Latin? Sweet.

  4. I blame Warty – he’s obviously not kidnapping enough of his fellow Ohioans to make a dent in the labor pool.

    1. Maybe we could convince him to feed the unemployed into his Furnace of Souls?

  5. Come and see both of our buildings! That train is taking jobs out of Cleveland! Who the fuck still uses a pay phone?

    So the Cleveland Tourism videos are really about all of Ohio? Having lived in that state, twice, I’d say yes.

    Also, fuck California.

  6. At least I can find comfort that one of the progressive’s biggest voting blocks is getting the royal shafting from the idiotic stuff the progressives are pushing for. Karma is a bitch.

  7. The recovery is doing just swell, and we are gaining jobs just as fast as ever. Tim Geithner said so.

    1. Yeah, we’re doing so well that Krugmann says France is better off!

  8. Nice. How about a chart we can read

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