Privacy

Misuse Concerns Raised Over Ohio's Facial Recognition Database

Cyberstalking, for one

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Ohio's law enforcement database and its facial recognition software are open to more than just law enforcement, a concern of members of the advisory group reviewing the security of the systems….

"If I'm a court employee, and I use my iPhone to take a photo of somebody that I'm curious about or maybe that I have a crush on or just want to know who they are, then I could use that cell phone photograph to access or find their identity if I otherwise have access to OHLEG?" asked Yvette McGee Brown, a former Ohio Supreme Court justice, who is the group's other co-chair.

Technically, yes, Raubenolt said – although that is illegal. A handful of people have been caught and prosecuted for misuse in OHLEG's 10 years of existence.