Raid

Texas Town Settles Wrong-Door Raid Lawsuit for $5,000, Admits No Wrongdoing

One of two brothers filing the suit died, making the defense's case harder to prove

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825 south of 823
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Two brothers in Longview Texas were victims of a wrong-door no-knock drug raid. Cops were supposed to go to 825 Beaumont Street but bust down the door at 823 Beaumont Street, yielding a lawsuit from the residents, two brothers. The lawsuit has now been settled. From the local newspaper, the News-Journal:

Kenneth Jimmerson [one of the brothers] died in December, said the family's attorney, and he and his client decided to settle the case out of court.

"It just made it really hard because you don't have the witnesses you had," said Dallas-based defense attorney Curtis Lilly.

City spokesman Shawn Hara said the $5,000 settlement is awaiting finalization of a motion to dismiss the portion of the case that deals with Kenneth Jimmerson.

Hara said the city did not admit to any wrongdoing as part of the settlement…

The Jimmersons had alleged the police officer's actions caused physical and emotional distress, including bringing "back vivid memories of an incident that resulted in the death of their brother at the hands of the Longview Police Department in the 1980s."

The defense attorney believes the settlement "sent a message" to the police department, and also says the police department recommended (unspecified) disciplinary action against the cops involved.

NEXT: FBI Raid Office of California State Senator

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  1. $5k is a joke, I am amazed that they took it.

  2. The brother was mysteriously tased to death. Police have no suspects.

  3. This is how cities roll. You just hold out as long as you can until the witnesses die or the plaintiff gets desperate.

  4. the city did not admit to any wrongdoing as part of the settlement?

    Sure, why admit that doing your raid at the wrong location involved any wrong doing?

  5. The defense attorney believes the settlement “sent a message” to the police department, and also says the police department recommended (unspecified) disciplinary action against the cops involved.

    The message is that they can do whatever the fuck they want, and the worst thing that may happen is a paid vacation.

    1. While the taxpayers soak up the civil damages.

  6. Obligatory:

    Rumor spreadin’ a-’round in that Texas town
    ’bout that shack outside La Grange.
    (And you know what I’m talkin’ about.)
    Just let me know if you wanna go
    To that home out on the range.
    They gotta lotta nice girls.

    Have mercy.
    A haw, haw, haw, haw, a haw.
    A haw, haw, haw.

    Well, I hear it’s fine if you got the time,
    And the ten to get yourself in.
    A hmm, hmm.
    And I hear it’s tight most ev’ry night,
    But now I might be mistaken.
    hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm.

    Have mercy.

    1. Longview isn’t actually very close to LaGrange. It is east of Dallas and LaGrange is half way between Houston and Austin. But nice reference none the less.

      1. It was “Texas Town” in the headline that set me off. I didn’t even read the article, with apologies to all.

        1. Oh the days when a small town could run a bordello in peace. Now you would be lucky to run a good whore house in Dallas.

          1. I bet Tres Hombres spent some time in that shack outside La Grange. Or its functional equivalent elsewhere.

            1. Can you imagine being a musician anywhere really but especially in Austin in the early 70s? Before AIDs and the feminist backlash against sex. I am quite sure they had more fun that God intended man to have.

              1. Their music would certainly imply certain hedonistic pursuits. And with those beards!

              2. I remember riding around Houston one day, one of the local morning shows (I think it was 101.1 back in the old days) played a great live version of some ZZ Top song during the Napster era. Billy Gibbons called the station and said, “Can you guys burn me a copy of that? I know its not technically legal, but I’ll write a check to the record company for the royalties.” He seemed like a cool guy.

  7. The Jimmersons had alleged the police officer’s actions caused physical and emotional distress, including bringing “back vivid memories of an incident that resulted in the death of their brother at the hands of the Longview Police Department in the 1980s.”

    Burying the lede?

  8. Nobody made this guy settle. And until people take these cases all the way through the court system and require an admission of wrongdoing as part of the damages, shit like this will continue to go unpunished and largely unnoticed.

    I’m sorry, but settlements like these do nothing but give a green light to abuse.

    1. Unfortunately the wrongdoers have comparatively unlimited resources and time. So when given a choice between settling and dragging it out until your grandchildren see a judgement, the prudent option is to settle.

    2. Unfortunately, as the attorney said, when one of the key witnesses dies, the case gets that much harder.

      1. I would have expected the physical evidence to be enough in this case.

        1. Sloopy,

          Send that $10 to the Reason Foundation yet? Go Blackhawks!

  9. I’d forgive Holder all his sins to date, if the DOJ would start droning the terrorist organizations sometimes referred to as “police”.

    1. Wait . . . never mind . . the DOJ is the top of the hierarchy for such terrorists.

  10. $5000? Does that even cover the retainer?

  11. sent a message that next time get a better attorney

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