Police Abuse

Man Tasered, Shot to Death After Father Calls 911 About Depression, Lawsuit Alleges

Sheriff's department says it was responding to a call about a family fight

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shot by cop
CBS

The family of a man who was Tasered and shot to death by a sheriff's deputy in Stanislaus County is suing the department in federal court. It happened  a year ago, and a local news report at the time indicated the family called 911 because the man, George Ramirez, was suffering from depression and making suicidal threats. (Another report characterized the incident as a "scuffle" between Ramirez and a deputy). The family claims in the lawsuit the responding deputy, Art Parra, asked for Martinez's whereabouts but not why 911 was called. According to Courthouse News:

Parra found Ramirez on the couch watching television, unaware that his family had called 911. Parra confirmed his identity and placed him under arrest by ordering him to stand up and turn around, according to the complaint.

"In the process of standing up and complying with orders, Ramirez asked Parra why he was under arrest and if he could see his credentials," the complaint states.

"Parra refused to respond and again ordered Ramirez to turn around, demanding Ramirez put his hands behind his back.

"Ramirez complied with the orders of Parra.

"Parra then demanded Ramirez to put his hands closer together behind his back.

"Ramirez turned around and asked Parra in a calm, non-threatening manner to identify himself.

"At this time, and without providing any warning, Parra withdrew his Taser gun from his holster and deployed two darts into Ramirez's chest and activated the Taser. Ramirez fell to the floor.

Ramirez stood up after being Tasered, dazed and confused, but still non-violent, the family says in the complaint. Parra warned Ramirez that he could shoot him, the complaint states.

"Ramirez raised his arms and said 'Shoot me.'
"At this time, Parra withdrew his firearm from his holster and shot four bullets at Ramirez.

"Parra was approximately eight feet away at the time he fired four shots at Ramirez, and three bullets struck Ramirez.

The sheriff's office said they were responding to a call of a family fight, and County Counsel called the sum the family was seeking, $61 million, excessive, according to the Modesto Bee, which also notes the shooting happened less than a week after one of the department's sheriff's deputy was killed and another injured by a gunman in a Modesto apartment building. 50 deputies and the sheriff were on the scene after Ramirez was shot and killed.

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  1. That’s cold-blooded murder, which is odd for an alleged sheep-fucker like Parra.

  2. But a national gun registry targeting the mentally ill, information doubtlessly made available to LEOs while responding to domestic disturbances, would be just dandy.

    1. I’m thinking about the benefits of a national registry of mentally ill law enforcement officers.

      1. Isn’t that just a registry of all LEOs?

        1. It’s a job requirement.

  3. Once again, never call the cops unless it is about a person you wouldn’t mind seeing dead. So if someone breaks in your house, call the cops. But if you are worried about someone you love, never call the cops under any circumstances. You might be signing theirs or even your death warrant.

    1. Police response is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get, but whatever it is will not be good for you.

      1. +150 net carbs

    2. dude in another thread did call cause of an intruder and they still shot him.

    3. Even then, the police may mistake you for the perp or find some reason to focus on you.

      We should be able to ask them for the papers to fill out and an instruction sheet. You should be able to file the form via mail.

    4. I’ve always agreed with this general premise but what do you suggest in a situation where you’re legitimately somewhat afraid for your safety but don’t want to see the person dead? Let’s say maybe something like a single mother being physically attacked by her teenage son, and let’s say he’s also trashing the place? Or say an aunt or grandmother with a nephew or grandson living with them in the same situation, just to use an example where the person may not have as much sway over the kid but still would be hurt to see him dead.

  4. Rule number 1, never, ever, ever call 911 unless you are prepared to risk the police shooting the people where you are.

    If the situation is so dangerous that the cops probably won’t make it worse, then fine, call them. But otherwise inviting the police into your home is like inviting a juvenile male chimpanzee into your home. If you luck out and get one that’s sexually frustrated, he may turn on you and rip your face off.

    1. Exactly. Cops always escalate a situation.

    2. I have called 911 once, to report some guys fighting in Harvard Square. I was not around by the time the cops got there.

      1. Guys fighting in Harvard Square… there’s a joke in there somewhere.

        1. ‘Thahs a wicked bad fight between some gahs in Harvahd Squah.”

          1. Those gahs are actin retahded

          2. I’m thinking more on the lines of two guys in tweed jackets with Bostonian accents, smoking pipes with ascots in a shoving match.

            Two guys who look and talk like George Plimpton slapfighting. That’s what I’m going for.

            1. You are far more likely to find skate-punks than guys wearing tweed jackets in the square.

              1. Huh, disappointing. I expected it to be more like a Jets vs. Sharks permanent rumble zone, but the gang members are all like George Plimpton.

  5. Fifty deputies and the Sheriff? Man, when they throw a coverup, everyone gets invited.

  6. according to the Modesto Bee, which also notes the shooting happened less than a week after one of the department’s sheriff’s deputy was killed and another injured by a gunman in a Modesto apartment building.

    How the fuck is that relevant to this story?

    1. The chimpanzees were enraged after a rival band killed one of the medium status males.

    2. Officer safety is the only thing relevant to the story.

      1. It is relevant but probably not the way that the reporter thinks it is. It is relevant because one of their own was killed a week before and they were going to make sure the next guy in an apartment with a gun paid for it.

    3. Officers were on edge. If civilians were not cognizant of that when dialing 911, the bullet holes in your back are your own fault.

  7. You guys with your criticisms. He asked to get shot, and, they shot him. What other branch of government is so responsive?

    1. He was just following orders!

  8. To be fair, they did make sure the man did not commit suicide. Problem solved!

    1. He hasn’t complained about depression since, either.

  9. Ramirez turned around and asked Parra in a calm, non-threatening manner to identify himself.

    Resisting arrest; disorderly conduct.

    Good shoot.

    1. yawn.

      Troll-o-meter -.01

      smooches

  10. So if you’re approached by the police anywhere, why shouldn’t you shoot them on the spot?

    You’re dead either way, right? Any benefits to cooperating?

    1. thats exactly where this is heading. If you saw the other article where the cops shot and killed a man in his own garage when they were responding to a robbery at the neighbors house. cops need to start to temper their shooting they seem to be shooting anybody at anytime even when they are under police control.

      1. What’s the point of being a LEO if you can’t maim and kill indiscriminately?

  11. “Plaintiffs are informed and believe that Stanislaus County Sheriff’s Department has a policy to not render aid if it appears that an individual, shot by a member of its department, will likely die without aid,”

    So they let them die if it looks like they will die without help? “It appears this guy is going to die if we don’t render aid”. “OK don’t render aid then”.

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