Vid: Feds Hounded 'Net Activist Aaron Swartz, Says EFF's Parker Higgins

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"The idea that an agent of the federal government would be able to pick out a person and threaten to ruin their life is not the kind of thing that we hope for in a justice system," says Parker Higgins, an internet activist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Higgins was a friend and associate of the late Aaron Swartz (1986-2013), the computer programmer, hacker, and activist who committed suicide last week. Swartz helped create the web syndication process RSS, was important in the founding of the popular social media site Reddit, and instrumental in organizing the successful campaign against the Stop Online Privacy Act (SOPA). He was facing up to 35 years in prison and $1 million in fines for downloading more than 4 million academic articles from the database JSTOR.

Watch the full interview above, or click the link below for downloadable versions and the full story.

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  1. The idea that an agent of the federal government would be able to pick out a person and threaten to ruin their life is not the kind of thing that we hope for in a justice system

    If that person broke the law (and in this case the law is something libertarians agree with) then yes, that is what we would hope for in a justice system.

    You don’t want your life ruined, don’t break the law.

    And don’t give me the five felonies a day stuff either, this fool knew exactly what he was doing and that it was very illegal.

    1. Suck that LEO dick, Tulpa! Suck it dry!

  2. Oh, and if JSTOR isn’t allowed to charge for access, there won’t be any digital access to the articles currently on JSTOR. Server space and bandwidth isn’t free, something I would think “digital activists” would know.

  3. Watch the full interview above, or click the link below for downloadable versions and the full story.

    There is no video above and no link below. Oops?

  4. Bring back the gibbet!

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