Reason-Rupe Public Opinion Survey

46 Percent of Californians Have Seriously Considered Leaving the Golden State

|

In the latest Reason-Rupe poll of 696 California voters, including 508 likely voters, 46 percent report they have seriously considered leaving the Golden State, 54 percent say they have not.

Among those who have considered moving out of California, the most likely reason given is the state's high cost of living. California's economic environment, including job opportunities, wages, and the business climate came in as the second most important reason. California's high level of taxation was the third most mentioned reason.

 

Note: Respondents answered using their own words and gave up to two responses; consequently, percentages in the above chart sum to more than 100 percent.

Nearly two thirds of Romney supporters have considered moving out of the state of California, in contrast, nearly two thirds of Obama voters have not. Fifty-six percent of Republicans and Independent-leaning Republicans and 82 percent of pure Independents have seriously considered moving out of the state. In contrast, 62 percent of Democrats and Independent-leaning Democrats have not.

About a third of both Republicans and Democrats mentioned California's high cost of living as a primary reason they considered moving. However, Republicans were more likely to mention taxes and Democrats more likely to mention jobs and wages.

California telephone poll conducted October 11th-15th on both landline and cell phones, 696 adults, margin of error +/- 3.8%. The sample also includes 508 likely voters, with a margin of error of +/- 5.1%. Columns may not add up to 100% due to rounding. Full methodology can be found here. Full poll results found here.

Advertisement

NEXT: SpaceX Dragon Returns to Earth

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. In a totally unrelated topic, 51% of Californians live there for the free shit.

    1. Oops, I meant 54%.

      Typing motherfucker, how do you do it?

  2. Did the poll include A Serious Man, and has he seriously thought about leaving California? He is, after all, serious.

    1. You can’t be serious.

    2. I honestly have no idea what I’m going to be doing with myself after I graduate college in the spring. I fully recognize that my BA in political science isn’t going to help much with employment prospects.

      A few professors that I’ve gotten to know say I have a very high aptitude with law and encourage me to look at law school, but I don’t think that’s a wise investment given the glut of unemployed people with law degrees.

      And as much as I hate the politics in this state, I love Southern California and I think this place is worth saving. It’ll likely just have to be after the state goes bankrupt.

      1. And as much as I hate the politics in this state, I love Southern California and I think this place is worth saving. It’ll likely just have to be after the state goes bankrupt.

        Yeah. Just a head’s up. If it starts to turn into a full-on Mad Max type situation, Sloopy and I have a plan. You will have to bring your own guns/ammo. Also, you have to bring your own assless chaps.

        1. He’d probably want to bring his own plan, too, seeing as sloopy and yours will undoubtedly involve eating dog food and having feral children throw boomerangs at you.

          1. There were no boomerangs in Waterworld, silly.

          2. My plan involves developing warp drive so we can contact the Vulcans.

            1. sloopy and EDG can go with their plan. I’m joining up with you for Vulcan contact.

              1. Having said that, can I bring my own assless chaps for the Vulcan contact? Otherwise, I’ll have to make the drive from Ventura county up to Visalia.

            2. Your name is Zefram Cochrane?!? Oh man, Geordi would so like to meet you!

              1. You want to know my vision? Dollar signs. Money. I want to retire on some tropical island filled with naked women. THAT’S my vision. That’s Zefram Cochrane. This historical guy you keep talking about: I’ve never met him. Can’t say I ever will.

                1. You think in such three-dimensional terms. How small you’ve become.

                  1. I’m confused. I was under the impression that the plan was to build an assless chaps factory.

                    1. I don’t see how that rules out eating dog food and having boomerangs thrown by feral children.

                    2. But the feral children will only be able to throw the boomerangs in the 4 hours a day that they are not forced to make assless chaps. And the dog food will be made with processed and grinded meat from the bones of the feral children that pass out on the factory floor.

                      They really do have a brilliant plan there. But the Vulcan contact is a higher priority for me. Although, I would settle for Romulan contact.

                    3. This kind of Vulcan contact?

                    4. if you’re eating dogfood, assless chaps will be necessary

      2. And as much as I hate the politics in this state, I love Southern California and I think this place is worth saving. It’ll likely just have to be after the state goes bankrupt.

        People say that like government bankruptcy is a bad thing. It’s not.

        A government going bankrupt means that they get out of bad contracts that some corrupt asshole stuck the taxpayers with and that non essential “services” get eliminated.

        It’s the best thing that can happen to us (I’m a socal resident too).

        1. I agree it’ll be the best possible outcome, which is why I’m hoping Prop 30 fails so the state will run out of options sooner than later. Unlike Brown and the legislature, a GOP House and Romney administration will have no problem pointing out the gaping $500 billion dollar shortfall in the pension system when working out a deal for a managed bankruptcy.

          1. I’ll be surprised if prop 30 passes.

            The last tax hike, a couple of years ago, lost in every single county in the state and people have become more anti-government since then.

            I also don’t think that there’s much chance of the federal government bailing out the state. But I am vaguely fearful that the Federal Reserve will buy state debt in the not to distant future.

            1. I’m pleasantly surprised by the tepid support for it too, but I’m also very discouraged that it has a lot of support on the college campuses because Christ forbid any women’s studies or sociology major be forced to pay for their education.

              It’s very difficult convincing them that the entire public education system in this state is fundamentally broken and incompetent at spending money.

        2. It’s the best thing that can happen to us (I’m a socal resident too).

          Given the sheer amount of SoCal Reason commentators, you’d think we’d have libertopia in Southern California.

        3. Except that a major reason California is going bankrupt is public sector employee pensions, and those benefits are protected under the state constitution.

          My solution is to pay for any shortfall with deductions from the wages of current public sector employees, but I’m not sure it that’s doable (legally or otherwise).

          1. It’s hard to see how a tax on public pensions could be called illegal. We just need to tax the pensions enough to pay the pension fund shortfall.

          2. I don’t understand why you want to save the govt from its budget woes.

            1. They are going to get “saved” one way or the other, so I’d prefer the cost be borne by the unionized state workers who are largely responsible for the problem in the first place, and not the taxpayers at large.

      3. I fully recognize that my BA in political science isn’t going to help much with employment prospects.

        I obtained my B.A. in PoliSci in 2004 and managed to get myself into a successful career without going into either politics or law. All my peers who ended up in law school hate their lives right now. I ended up in real estate, in part since I had always had an interest in money and economics. It didn’t hurt that the guy who interviewed me from the company I’ve been with since then was a fellow Davis grad and I got a bit of an alumni benefit from it.

        I fully recognize that the current economic climate isn’t quite as rosy as it was in 2004, but you’ll find something. Then it’s just a matter of climbing that ladder like Epi climbing into Warty’s loveloft.

        1. Warty put an escalator in, which makes things a whole lot easier now.

          Here’s a question: whatever possessed you to get a degree in polisci? Same question for you, Serious.

          1. The same thing that possesses everyone to get a polisci degree: laziness. Besides, who do you think Warty installed the elevator for?

            1. That two-timing whore!

              But isn’t there a nominally better degree you can get that isn’t as utterly worthless as polisci yet basically as easy?

              1. The choices are communications, sociology, psychology, or polisci.

                And polisci is the most useful among them.

                1. Your world is terrifying. Your classes must have been excruciating.

                  1. It was the easiest four years of my life. Twice a year, I’d fill up a blue book with Marxist and progressive slogans and I was able to spend the other 22 hours each day binge drinking, smoking weed, and playing video games.

                    1. Well, I guess if you didn’t go to class it wouldn’t be painful. But the thought of attending some of those classes…

                  2. I have a worthless degree in Technical Theatre. I originally was planning on becoming a costume designer. Those plans changed quickly around my sophomore year when I realized that:

                    1. I would have to join a union
                    2. Live in LA or NY
                    3. Have been on death row within a year for all the actors/actresses I brutally murdered

                    I was too lazy to switch degrees so I finished it off knowing that I was going to do nothing with it. Plus the classes were fucking awesome: makeup, costume design, set design, lighting design, millinery, wig making. It was like getting a degree in arts and crafts. I wound up working as a file clerk at an IP law firm and worked my way up within a year doing paralegal work. I could have done that without my useless degree and student loans.

                    1. My recommendation to every relative or acquaintance for the last number of years who was going to go to college was “wait and figure out what you actually want to do, not what you think you want to do”.

                      Nobody listened.

            2. Here’s a question: whatever possessed you to get a degree in polisci? Same question for you, Serious.

              I find it interesting and I can pass all my classes with minimal effort. So that means either I’m exceptionally bright or the subject matter is easy. I do possess excellent analytical and writing skills so politics seemed like the way to go.

              And I could never pay attention to math or science, so that went out the window in high school when I could barely pass algebra and chemistry.

              My recommendation to every relative or acquaintance for the last number of years who was going to go to college was “wait and figure out what you actually want to do, not what you think you want to do”.

              I would like to get paid to express my opinion in writing. If it weren’t a bad investment I probably would go to law school too.

  3. They move to Arizona and then vote to make things more like California.

    1. Or Colorado.

      I’m hoping it all works out in the end where the only people that remain in California are the bemonocled overlords like myself.

    2. Hey maybe some of the descendants of undocumented workers will move there, since we know that they never vote for crappy government and just want to work hard for little pay.

    3. You mean people in Arizona and Nevada don’t like the idea of state mandated smokeless bars and restaurants? How utterly barbaric.

  4. Especially if Prop 30 passes next week, when income taxes go up so that they are 21% higher than the next highest state (Hawaii), I will have to think about heading out. If only the weather and scenery were not so damned great here.

    1. No on 30? Shit.

      1. You mean “sheeeeeeee-it”

  5. My co-worker isn’t contemplating, he’s actively planning to transfer to our Florida facility. I don’t have that choice.

  6. Never lived there, only visited. But I must admit, every waking moment I was there, all I could think of was leaving escaping.

    1. I’m glad you were able to escape the armed thugs that were holding you captive in California. What a terrible ordeal that must have been.

  7. Sounds like a prety solid plan to me dde. wow
    http://www.is-anon.tk

  8. Improving home prices (and it’s happening in the Bay Area) will allow many of us to escape California–hopefully before the financial collapse of the State’s finances. The only hope for the public employee pensions is not higher income taxes but the outright seizing of wealth (property and property taxes). Our family plan is to be headed out by mid-2014. Why do you think so many high-tech companies are leaving for Texas (e.g. Apple and Samsung)

  9. “46 Percent of Californians Have Seriously Considered Leaving the Golden State”
    …sounds about right. The other 54% are ILLEGALS living of income and wealth redistribution from the 46%.

  10. Ahh the disconnect….

    “About a third of both Republicans and Democrats mentioned California’s high cost of living as a primary reason they considered moving. However, Republicans were more likely to mention taxes and Democrats more likely to mention jobs and wages.”

    Where the Dems wanting to leave blame bad jobs and wages instead of the tax scheme which prevents good jobs and wages from forming….

    By this logic…. I guess all those taxpayers, individuals and businesses, which are/were being raped by California’s taxation were just asking for it.

    I mean really….. what did they expect when they dressed like that and went to those places during those times?

    The only thing not funny is the amount of people who do honestly believe they all deserved it…

  11. Poll is useless unless it asks each respondent whether they’re a maker or a taker. A better metric would be to look at all the companies formerly based in California (Google and Apple come to mind) that have recently announced that they’re leaving California to move to Idaho.

  12. That 46% want to leave is no surprise, what is a shock is that the number one reason cited is the high cost of living. Read further and 13 of the next 14 less chosen reasons (all liberal policies) all add up to be the very cause of the high cost of living! This just proves one of my thoughts about the voters in this Country?they are stupid. They do not see the direct link between electing democrats, the high cost of EVERYTHING, and the loss of our freedom and cultural identity (yes, that is a BAD thing). But at least they have high self esteem and feel good about themselves. That’s about the extent of what they’re taught in publik skool these days.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.