Immigration

Lundy Khoy Barely Escaped Pol Pot's Purge; Now the U.S. Is Threatening to Deport Her for a Decade-Old Drug Charge

|

In the spring of 2000, a bicycle cop in Arlington, Virginia stopped 19-year-old Lundy Khoy and asked her if she was carrying any drugs. "Having been taught to trust the police," Khoy writes of the experience, "I answered honestly." She told the cop that she had seven tabs of ecstasy, and that she planned to sell them to pay back some money she took from her mom.

In Virginia, possesion with intent to sell is an aggrevated felony.  

"On the advice of my lawyer and feeling that a trial would increase my family's suffering and embarrassment," Khoy writes, "I pled guilty and was sentenced to five years in jail."

Khoy served three months and was released for good behavior. She moved back in with her parents, got a job, and enrolled in community college. "I began to accept, forgive, and believe in myself," writes Khoy, who is now 31. She also completed four years of supervised probation without missing appointments or failing drug tests. 

If Lundy Khoy had been born in the United States–instead of in a refugee camp in Thailand for Cambodians fleeing Pol Pot's ethnic cleansing campaign–she would be free and clear. But Lundy Khoy didn't come here until she was 12 months old. She's not a citizen, only a "legal permanent resident." 

Because of her immigration status and the mistake she made when she was 19, Lundy Khoy could soon be separated from her mother and father and her American-born brother and sister, and deported from the only country she's ever known.

Khoy was born in 1980 in a Thai refugee camp. She moved with her mother and father to California in 1981. Her parents were socially conservative and wanted Khoy to keep her Cambodian heritage. She didn't play sports, or participate in extracurricular activities. "Playtime was only on the weekends; me and my siblings [a brother and a sister, both born in the U.S.] were expected to come straight home after school to do our homework, help mom cook and then start on our chores." 

The Khoys moved from California to Northern Virginia when Lundy Khoy was in high school. Upon graduation, Khoy got her first taste of independence. She started running with a party crowd and experimenting with drugs. It was near the end of her freshman year at George Mason University–the wildest year in the average American teenager's life–that she was busted with ecstasy.

In the spring of 2004, Lundy arrived at a regularly scheduled probation appointment to show off her college report card. When she stepped inside the office, she was greeted by her probation officer–and a slew of agents from Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. They "instructed me to hand over my possessions and stand spread eagle against the wall," Khoy says. "As my probation officer silently apologized, they escorted me out of the office, handcuffed me and eventually took me to Hampton Roads Regional Jail in Portsmouth, Virginia." 

What happened next would not have happened if Khoy had been born in the United States. But because Khoy is not an American citizen, she was held at Hampton Roads–without a trial–for nine months, while the United States attempted to deport her to Cambodia. 

In a Kafkaesque twist, Cambodia refused to take Khoy, saying that because she was born in Thailand and has never visited Cambodia, she has no ties to the country. With nowhere to send her, ICE released Khoy. But the agency wasn't done just yet.  

In April 2012, ICE enrolled Khoy in its "Intensive Supervision Appearance Program," a detention alternative for immigrants ICE eventually wants to deport. ISAP involves closely monitoring immigrants using ankle tracking bracelets and frequent home visits. To top it all off, Khoy's caseworker told her that if Cambodia won't take her, she should just pick another country to be deported to. 

Why does Lundy Khoy have to be deported at all? That's the question the Khoy family has been trying to answer for the last seven years. 

"Lundy's deportation order is a result specifically of the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA)," Khoy's sister wrote in a Change.org petition

"These laws dramatically increased the kinds of offenses for which non-citizens (including legal permanent residents like Lundy who arrived as refugees) can be detained and deported. The laws do not allow immigration judges to consider Lundy's individual circumstances (her ties to the U.S., her work history, or her community service) before ordering her to be deported." 

While her deportation has felt imminent for years now, Khoy hasn't let that stop her from putting her life back together. After leaving Hampton Roads, she found another job, this time as an enrollment counselor with the University of Phoenix. She re-enrolled in college yet again, and is close to completing her bachelors degree. She resumed volunteering with groups like Habitat for Humanity and the Boys and Girls Club. 

Khoy's also been proactive about bringing attention to the laws that make it easy for lifelong Americans to be deported for minor crimes. She's enlisted the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center, documentary filmmaker Laurel Gwizdak, and immigration attorney Jim Tom Haynes of Washington, D.C., to make a documentary about her case. 

"I have a 'Final Order of Removal' and currently do not know when I will be deported," Khoy wrote in an email. "My lawyer is going to file for a deferred action, if approve I can stay in the U.S. temporary for 6-12 months. It is a temporary fix but not the solution."

Khoy also wrote a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

"I ate Cheerios for breakfast and took the bus to school. I played on the monkey bars and my mom always packed my lunch. We went to Disneyland every year and religiously watched the Fourth of July fireworks from the beach," Khoy's letter reads. 

"I am not a U.S. citizen; but there is no way I am not an American. The United States of America has always been my home and is my Country." 

Her country is now telling Lundy Khoy she has to leave. 

NEXT: Tropical Storm Isaac Almost Certain to Become Hurricane

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. I wonder how many celebrities who have been charged with drug possession have been deported or threatened with deportation.

    I bet the answer is in between 1 and -1.

    1. Also, politicians or family members thereof. They get away with all kinds of shit, too.

    2. Didn’t John Lennon have problems back in the day?

      Still, that’s 30+ years ago now.

      1. John Lennon had trouble getting a Green Card.

        William F Buckley went to bat for him and for some reason the government’s objection to his possession conviction evaporated.

    3. I don’t know about deportation, but there have been a handful of pro athletes with border crossing problems due to records. But yeah, the general point is still fine even if the number is slightly greater than zero.

  2. “Having been taught to trust the police,” Khoy writes of the experience, “I answered honestly.”

    Hard to work up sympathy after reading this. You would think mom and dad, having fled an oppressive “lawful” regime, would have taught their children to have a healthy suspicion of authority.

    1. I know – those morons actually believed America was a country with an honest civil service and a dedication to freedom.

      Joke’s on them, eh AC?

      1. I can sort of understand telling the cop you have some drugs on you when it’s your first encounter but why in the hell would you then tell the cop you intended to sell the drugs?

        1. Naivete. People tell cops stuff they shouldn’t all of the damn time. For that matter, why would anyone agree to be televised on “COPS”? Cops still have an image of “I’m here to help”.

      2. America is a vast improvment over Cambodia, but it has its own dangerous government officials. Sure, they can’t take you into an empty field and shoot you for wearing glasses (Palm Beach is working on that though), but expecting not to be fucked with by bureaucrats and petty officials is just being gullible.

        1. I want to point out, in the interests of accuracy, that the Khmer Rouge would not take you into an empty field and shoot you for wearing glasses. The KR were critically short of ammunition. If you wore glasses, they would take you into an empty field and beat you to death.

    2. Well, to be fair, at least Anonymous Coward picked the right online handle.

  3. “Having been taught to trust the police,” Khoy writes of the experience, “I answered honestly.”

    Why would a refugee from the Khmer Rouge be taught to trust the police?

    1. Because her foolish immigrant parents wrongly believed that America was the “Land of the Free and Home of the Brave” and full of honest civil servants.

      So let’s all mock them for their foolishness instead of, you know, trying not to be dickholes.

      1. We mock Americans for trusting authority all the time. And in this case, people with direct personal experience with evil authorities, still trust authority.

        I think that says something disturbing about human nature, not this individual.

        1. Yes, making fun of her parents is definitely the essence of the piece here.

          1. Yes, clearly I’m making fun of her parents.

            Shouldn’t you be out organizing an anti-Mormon pogrom now?

            1. Shouldn’t you be out organizing an anti-Mormon pogrom now?

              Nauvoo II: Mormon Bugaloo.

              1. Fortunately, pinot swilling metros are only a threat themselves.

      2. It sounds like in this case, the civil servants have followed the law.

        It’s the law that’s an ass.

        1. Of course it is, but the civil servants (outside of the probation officer) seem to be rather enthusiastic about their tasks.

        2. IMO a person who seeks out to enforce unjust laws is an ass.

          1. Yes. A police officer is a moral agent like every other human being, not a drone. Every day, a police officer wakes up and chooses to enforce unjust laws.

            1. But Dunphy has done more good for the world than you ever will by posting here, unjust laws or not.

              1. can’t tell if serios

                1. He’ll actually make that argument, and I find it hilarious everytime he does.

            2. By virtue of the fact that they chose this particular occupation, that is exactly what they do.
              Unless police departments are conscripting people.

              1. Unless police departments are conscripting people.

                Too many people itching to exercise power over others for there to ever be a need for conscription.

        3. Just following orders! The law is the law!

          Cops, prosecutors, and judges all have discretion. Any one of these people could have put the brakes on this ridiculous situation at any time.

          1. Not always.

            The laws do not allow immigration judges to consider Lundy’s individual circumstances (her ties to the U.S., her work history, or her community service) before ordering her to be deported.”

            1. There was a prosecutor involved, no doubt, who could have cut a deal.

              1. They probably did. She plead guilty and only served 3 months of her sentence. As far as the deportation, the problem is that the new(ish) laws remove all discretion.

              2. There was a prosecutor involved, no doubt, who could have cut a deal.

                I’ll do ya one better: there was a cop who could’ve simply told her to dump the beans down a storm drain.

        4. You know which civil servants also followed the law: Nazis.

  4. Some days I am just so utterly fucking pround of my country.

    1. Fuck the cheerios and monkey bars. There’s nothing more ‘Murrican than being on probation for drug offenses…

  5. “Having been taught to trust the police,”

    Why would someone ever teach someone something as stupid as that?

  6. Why does Lundy Khoy have to be deported at all?

    Because…fuck you, that’s why.

    1. Why would she be deported NOW, and not upon release from jail a decade ago?

      If it was going to happen, it seems it should have been back then.

  7. The laws do not allow immigration judges to consider Lundy’s individual circumstances judge

    ftfy

  8. So, with a chance to rail against both drug and immigration policies, the Reason commentariat goes off on parents for foolishly trusting police.

    1. Why engage in substantive policy criticism when you can mock a young immigrant woman?

      1. ARE YOU MOCKING ME?

        I NEED TP FOR MY BUNGHOLIO!!

    2. The first and second are preaching to the choir. The latter apparently isnt.

  9. Surely this young lady is a serious threat to national security.

    But, we all know that no way can this actually happen under our current compassionate administration. Why, if he has to, the big O will step in here and say that the police acted stupidly.

    Her mistake is that she thought she came to America, not Amerika. Well, I guess she knows now.

    1. Obama should invite Khoy for an X-Dropping Summit.

      1. More likely he pushes the issue to get her deported. She’s just a poor dirty Asain after all. Dirty Asians are messing up the good ghettos with dirty restaurants. If she wore a hoodie then maybe the O steps in to help her.

        1. She’s just a poor dirty Asain after all.

          Unless they’re “good, pious Muslims” like Obama’s Indonesian friends. (The ones that regularly rape and kill their Chinese minority population.)

          If Khoy is Cham, expect her to get amnesty tomorrow.

          1. To just boil this down to it’s simplest state, the only way anyone gets amnesty from O is if he sees it as a political move to his advantage. This guy would sell his own mother, brother, daughters, whoever, right down the river for one more ounce of power.

  10. The important thing is that uppity negroes were prevented from thinking they were as good as white men. Unfortunately, that vital defense of society occasionally – like all wars – requires distasteful methods.

  11. Never trust the coppers.

  12. “Having been taught to trust the police,” Khoy writes of the experience, “I answered honestly.”

    Idiot.

    1. What the fuck has gotten into you people today?

      1. Whats gotten into today, today?

      2. Randian,

        Let me explain it to you.

        No woman deserves to be raped.

        IF, however, a young, pretty thing puts on a miniskirt sans underwear, and goes to the Combat Zone and gets shitfaced and gets raped, we aren’t going to say – you poor dear, you are the victim of terrible luck.

        IF your son calls you and says – “Dad, I didn’t lock the car when I parked it at Wallmart, and it’s gone!”, will you refrain from asking him what he was thinking?

        These people should have brought up their daughter properly to not trust the cops.

        Yes, if she lived in a civilized country she could buy and sell Ecstasy tablets as if they were baseball cards. Yes, it’s possible that she felt that the police would find the drugs inevitably and that an admission and cooperation would make things easier for her.

        But she was a resident alien (an abomination of a legal status), making her extremely vulnerable to attack from the govt. She did herself no favors cooperating and trusting an organization that is looking for an excuse to fuck her up.

        1. IF, however, a young, pretty thing puts on a miniskirt sans underwear, and goes to the Combat Zone and gets shitfaced and gets raped, we aren’t going to say – you poor dear, you are the victim of terrible luck.

          No, but she would still be a victim, you incredible tool. I certainly wouldn’t blame her or call her names to her face.

          1. lack of pity != blame

            Nice straw man though.

            1. It’s really, really important you tell us what a He-Man Woman-Hater you are and demonstrate your lack of pity.

              *oh, sarcasmic…you’re such a man!*

              *swoons*

              1. Straw man followed by ad-hominem.

                What do you do for an encore? Move the goalposts?

                1. “Watch out guys, we’re dealing with a badass over here”

        2. You’re right, Randian, she would still be a victim.

          But she’d still be an idiot for putting herself in a situation where she was unable to protect herself.

          DO you understand what we are saying now, sweetie?

          1. Because the most important part of all this is assigning blame to the victim…oh excuse me, calling her an idiot and making sure everyone knows how callously badass you are for doing so.

            Not everything is a dick-measuring contest. It’s OK to have sympathy for someone who is both a victim of both the inane drug laws and the inane immigration laws, even if she made the mistake of introducing herself to the system.

            1. No, Randian, the most important thing in this whole affair is me getting my lunch – that’s all arranged.

              The second most important thing is condemning drug laws, which I did.

              The third most important thing is reading what other people said.

              The fourth most important thing is correcting your misconceptions about what people think is the most important thing.

              One of the reasons why everyone is exasperated with you is that you have this weird tendency to assume that reality is what is in your head. This leads you to make assumptions about what is going on in other people’s heads that are unsupported by actual evidence.

              Anything else I can help you with, sweetie?

              1. One of the reasons why everyone is exasperated with you is that you have this weird tendency to assume that reality is what is in your head.

                I am reading the words in front of me, wherein you basically said that this girl was asking for it, a la a rape victim who gets loaded and wears no panties.

                Those were your words, not mine.

                1. I am reading the words in front of me, wherein you basically said that this girl was asking for it, a la a rape victim who gets loaded and wears no panties.

                  No, we are saying she was being stupid and making herself vulnerable to the point she was certain to be attacked.

                  Those were our words. Your interpretation is all in your head.

                  What else can I help you with, sweetie?

                  1. No, we are saying she was being stupid and making herself vulnerable to the point she was certain to be attacked.

                    Right, and that’s the essence of the piece.

                    I wonder why you chose to point that out? Just for fun? Any particular reason?

                  2. No, we are saying she was being stupid and making herself vulnerable to the point she was certain to be attacked.

                    True, if you’re going to sell X, you should know not to talk to the cops. However, I’m not sure you understand the cultural pressure she was under to pay back her mother. We’re talking about the same part of the world that produces honor students who work two jobs to support their brothers and sisters (and get jailed for it).

                  3. “No, we are saying she was being stupid and making herself vulnerable to the point she was certain to be attacked.

                    That`s blaming the victim. Either the rapist is responsible or he isn`t. It`s not the woman`s fault. Say hi to Akin for me.

              2. This leads you to make assumptions about what is going on in other people’s heads that are unsupported by actual evidence.

                “But the straw men are real! They’re real I tell you! They’re real!”

        3. “IF, however, a young, pretty thing puts on a miniskirt sans underwear, and goes to the Combat Zone and gets shitfaced and gets raped, we aren’t going to say – you poor dear, you are the victim of terrible luck.”

          Well, actually, a psychiatrically healthy non-mysoginist would still sympathize with the girl. But you sound like an Akin-head. How’s the 12th century working out for you?

        4. IF, however, a young, pretty thing puts on a miniskirt sans underwear, and goes to the Combat Zone and gets shitfaced and gets raped, we aren’t going to say – you poor dear, you are the victim of terrible luck.

          It is my long held belief that women should only wear sunscreen and a gun belt, panties optional.

      3. What the fuck has gotten into us? Jesus Christ, Tulpa Jr., look in a goodamn mirror.

        1. Like I said, it’s really important you broadcast what an “idiot” this girl is.

          I mean, that’s like, the essence of this piece right here is to deride poor decision-making.

          1. Well, luckily, some white knight dipshit came along to tell us all how terrible we are.

            1. Uh, yeah, white-knighting only really works if she is here herself.

              As it stands, I am just broadcasting what a pack of dicks you are for latching onto the one mistake and rubbing salt in that wound instead of, you know, substantively criticizing the policy in place.

              1. Unsubstantive? That’s what you’ve got? Nice work, MNG.

                1. Unsubstantive? That’s what you’ve got? Nice work, MNG.

                  Wait, sorry, you’re right. You called the victim an idiot. I forgot about that contribution to the discussion.

                  1. She’s a dipshit for trusting the police. That’s undeniably true. You, on the other hand, have become an intolerable and pedantic concern troll for some reason. Did you suffer a traumatic brain injury?

                    1. She’s a dipshit for trusting the police. That’s undeniably true. You, on the other hand, have become an intolerable and pedantic concern troll for some reason.

                      Again, sorry that your contribution to this thread got called out for the bullshit that it was. Try not to be too butthurt about it. We all make mistakes.

            2. Quit mouthing off, punk. Just be thankful that the Outrage Police don’t take you downtown.

            3. How is it “white-knighting” to point out how sanctimonious it is to scoff at someone who was raised in a traditional, authoritarian culture and probably didn’t have the same educational experiences that most of us had. How can we expect her to occupy the same intellectual head-space as a civil libertarian who has more understanding of the 5th Admendment that the average native-born citizen?

              1. Anyone who trusts the police is an idiot, dude. It doesn’t matter what kind of Confucian nightmare shithole they come from.

                1. Funny thing is, in someways the corrupt Cambodian cops are easier to deal with. For the right price, anything can go away.

                  By the way, if you’re ever in Phnom Pehn, stop by the army base. For like 50 bucks, they’ll let you fire any weapon, including RPGs.

                2. Not only that.

                  But her parents have direct personal negative experience from trusting the police – ie the Khmer Rouge; and still taught her to trust the police.

                  That little story tells something about the propensity of people to trust authority even when they’ve been fucked for doing so.

                  1. Her parents were probably not equating the Khmer Rouge with American local 5-0.

                    I have to go with HM on this. Many on here seem to be assuming that everyone is coming from the standpoint of a libertarian who reads Balko pieces regularly.

                    Most people have not had direct experiences with being fucked over by the cops, nor do they follow these sorts of news stories. The young woman may be naive, certainly, but in no way an idiot.

                3. So because the girl was naively trusting of the police, you lose compassion?
                  What a dick.
                  Sleep tight with those dick extensions, errr, guns. That’s all you’ll have. Or probably do have.
                  I can’t imagine any woman putting up with such a piece of shit.

                  1. That was meant for warty.

                4. Cambodia is not a Confucian country. Confucian countries are China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Vietnam–the countries which happen to also use chopsticks…

              2. HM 11:56-

                someone who was raised in a traditional, authoritarian culture and probably didn’t have the same educational experiences that most of us had.

                Really?

                I’ll agree that she was raised in an authoritarian culture–she was brought to America when she was twelve months old- and was educated in Virginia.

  13. She was taught to trust the police. OK, fine. The only thing that there was to trust about this cop was that he was certain to bust her ass for a serious crime if she admitted that she was packing ecstasy for the purpose of selling it. She shouldn’t be deported for the drug thing – she should be deported for being terminally stupid.

    1. Yes, because being a first-generation immigrant raised by traditionalist Asian parents didn’t influence her views on authority.

      Nope.

      1. Like NEM said, this is a golden opportunity to criticize immigration policy and drug policy, and the first thing five commenters did was call the victim of bad policies an “idiot” and a “moron”.

        Christ on a Cracker.

        1. Preaching to the choir.

          We all agree on the immigration and drug policy, whats the fun of rehashing that?

          1. We all agree on the immigration…policy

            You mean the 500 comments on Morning Links were for nothing?

        2. I actually agree with Randian here: we’re not discussing the important issues. She’s 1) cute 2) in need of a husband ASAP and 3) gullible.

          1. Re #2, would a husband prevent deportation? I dont think it works that way for “criminals”.

            1. It doesn’t.

              The savages who work for the U.S. government are looking for any excuse to kick people out.

          2. Speaking from experience, only marry the girl if can handle the Cambodian Crazy ™.

            Seriously, it takes time learning to fall asleep next to a woman that keeps a straight razor on her nightstand and will just as likely stifle you with her pillow.

            1. So, the sex is amazing, is it?

              1. Indeed.

            2. I wanna say “Fuck you, waiting-for- melanoma-to-strike white dudes and your Asian female stereotypes,” BUT my mom is bat shit crazy…

          3. I actually agree with Randian here: we’re not discussing the important issues. She’s 1) cute 2) in need of a husband ASAP and 3) gullible.

            Thank you. I feel slightly less evil for not being the only person who thought this.

        3. So a person has no obligation to protect themselves from bad policies?

          1. A clear-cut case of blaming the victim.

            Nice, AC.

            1. A victim of her own stupidity, maybe.

              Offer nothing, admit to nothing, SAY nothing.

              1. How many people actually teach their kids that? Not many, I bet.

                1. I do. At every opportunity.

            2. lack of pity != blame

            3. Look, it was dumb to trust the police like that, but seriously, she was, what, nineteen, when it happened? None of us did anything stupid when we were nineteen. None of us was naive. None of us trusted authority back then. none of us was intimidated by older people who we were inculcated to respect and not question. No, we were all cynical and wordly libertarians back then.

              1. I’ll gladly own being stupid at 19, but naive? I left that behind in before entering high school.

                1. You should own up to being stupid as of Aug. 28, 2012. Or at least a condascending asshole.

        4. Because she’s blameless in all of this? Poor decisions are compounded by bad policy, but that doesn’t excuse you from criticism for the initial poor decision.

          After spending 18 years here, why would you think admitting you’re doing something illegal to the cops is a good, or even rational, play?

          And yes, our immigration system is terminally fucked, but there is apparently zero desire to reform it in ways that actually would make a difference. ‘Comprehensive immigration reform’ is an incoherent mishmash of bullshit.

          1. To be fair, remember that most people get their news from sources that say things such as “isolated incident” without any irony.

            I’m ashamed to admit I didn’t think police abuses were nearly as bad as they are prior to reading Balko.

            She was an Asian woman, who probably hadn’t heard of most police perfidy, probably never had much, if any interaction with the cops, and who was trained by her parents to be compliant with authority. I think she got a pretty brutal and unfair lesson. Also, if anyone really deserves to be insulted, it’s the dickheads in conventional media who refuse to report on abuses for fear they might lose their lifelines to the corridors of power.

            1. Also, if anyone really deserves to be insulted, it’s the dickheads in conventional media who refuse to report on abuses for fear they might lose their lifelines to the corridors of power.

              No, Penguin, it is really, really important that we call this girl an idiot. FOR GREAT JUSTICE.

              1. I think everyone got your point by now, Randian.

                1. Not yet. But they will…oh, they will.

                  1. It’s always a strong bit of irony when someone posts that…on the internet…at someone else.

              2. Just think of us as the completely voluntary non-coercive Justice League of Libertopia, but without the Wonder Twins, or Wendy and Marvin.

                And Wonder Woman has a skimpier outfit. For great justice, naturally.

      2. Certainly it would. Traditional Asian culture is just way more respectful of authoritah to start with.

    2. I’m sure she knew she was going to get into big trouble by telling the cop the truth, and she plead guilty to save her family from “suffering and embarrassment.” I’m sure the logic of that would escape most Americans, but for the child of a first generation asian immigrant it makes perfect sense.

      1. You have NO IDEA. I would do one thing wrong, and by one thing wrong,I mean talk out of turn… or one time, seriously, my BIKE WAS STOLEN (and it was my fault!!! for leaving it locked up in too public a place) and my mom would take out the wooden spoon or leather strap and beat me while screaming how my behavior makes HER look bad. That’s ALL I heard in my childhood…”YOU make ME look bad!!”

        1. Asia and authoritarianism blend like butter and buffalo wing sauce.

    3. If people were deported for being terminally stupid, America would be cleared out within a week. You couldn’t field a football team with who was left.

  14. I would also point out she could have avoided this problem by getting her citizenship.

    Even if her parents didnt want her having it, she should have done that when she turned 18.

    1. That’s the worst thing she could possibly do. Now she’s free to leave and move to Singapore or Hong Kong, or somewhere else that is pro business, without being hounded by the IRS. Why would anyone want to become a citizen here? Now THAT would be stupid.

      1. Singapore or Hong Kong, where possession of 7 tabs of ecstasy would mean life imprisonment? Yeah, that’s not ridiculous at all.

    2. For a lot of people, citizenship is a very personal thing. I am working on getting my Japanese citizenship and dumping my US one, because my plan is to bail this country by 2012. However, having lived abroad for a quarter of my life,I can say that you get homesick and wistful about your country and citizenship when living abroad. It’s a little bit difficult in an emotional sense, and I am about as emotional as a vulcan. I will give up US citizenship, but there is a tiny bit of regret about it. It can be more difficult for more touchy-feely types.

      1. However, having lived abroad for a quarter of my life,I can say that you get homesick and wistful about your country and citizenship when living abroad.

        I had the precise opposite reaction, and was actually trying to figure out how to give up my citizenship when I had to move back to the U.S.

  15. We need a statute of limitations on the law here. If you have been here for 31 years, I think that you should be able to “rest easy”, which is the point of statutes of limitation.

    1. Holy shit, you said something reasonable and not insufferable on the thread. I’m sure it will pass.

      1. Try to say something substantive, you glib prick.

          1. I have more fans!

            Tiresome moral scold is tiresome.

            1. Dear JW,

              Hi To My #1 Fan!

              XX,

              Randian.

              1. Holy fuck. You have become MNG.

                Congrats.

            2. “Tiresome moral scold is tiresome.”

              Cliched sentence construction is cliched.

        1. I read the comment before I read the handle and I was actually surprised.

  16. This story has nothing to do with immigration and everything to do with the stupid drug laws. If she had stolen a bunch of money or committed a real crime, I doubt Reason would be too concerned that the government was deporting her after her sentence. And they shouldn’t be. If you want to come here and get permanent residence, don’t commit a crime.

    The problem is she didn’t commit a “crime” or at least anything that should be a crime. King Obama could grant her amnesty and the conviction would still be bullshit. This is a drug war story Reason is trying to shoehorn into an immigration story.

    1. The immigration aspect, to me, is why is she being deported today, instead of a decade ago?

      1. Bureaucracy doesn’t work at light speed, last I checked.

        1. The courts are so overloaded now because of a plethora of stupid laws that soon people might start getting a break by never actually getting to court in their lifetime. Of course, that wouldn’t be good if you were waiting in a prison for your trial.

          1. Depends on the crime and how much time you are looking it. Basically a log jam like that is great for professional criminals who know how to work the system and horrible for law abiding people who get caught up in it and have something to lose.

        2. Reading the article, I see they started the proceedings in 2004. So yeah, it wasnt like they waited a decade.

          Its still fucked up.

      2. Big deal. If she was an MS 13 gang leader and a real criminal, would you think the ten year delay means she should stay? I wouldn’t. The delay only seems appalling because her “crime” is such bullshit.

        1. I think if you are going to deport, you have the hearing while the individual is in jail, and deport on release. Whether a bullshit crime* or a gang leader. If a gang leader had a decade clean record where they straitened up their life and got a college degree and was living legal, I wouldnt deport them after a decade either. Actually, I wouldnt deport after a decade period…but if they were still a criminal, it wouldnt be a decade, because there would be a new crime.

          *of course, I would not jail for the crime, I agree with you on that aspect.

          1. I think if you are going to deport, you have the hearing while the individual is in jail, and deport on release.

            HA HA HA!

            What, you think the 6th Amendment is not only for citizens?

          2. There’s the uncertainty of your life. do you go to college, get into long term relationships, work on a career when you may be deported at anytime? The Chinese have special death penalty like this. For some people, they are sentanced to death with no date for execution. And they are not in jail like death row. They go about living their regular lives in the world, and one day, maybe a few months, maybe ten years, they come and put a bullet in their head.

        2. It could only be a crime in a primitive and barbaric society sliding into totalitarianism. That is where we sit. We really are not that much better than China, and I wouldn’t be surprised if we are worse on human rights than they are in a decade from now.

          The only reason people still immigrate here is because the global bullshit press is where they get all of their news from. If they knew the truth, they would stay put or go somewhere else.

          1. he only reason people still immigrate here is because the global bullshit press is where they get all of their news from. If they knew the truth, they would stay put or go somewhere else.

            Sadly, despite all the rah-rah, it’s still the best place on the planet to go overall. We have serious problems here, but it’s nothing compared to elsewhere.

            I think that says more about the shitty state of actual, legitimate human rights (not to be confused with what the UN thinks they are) on the planet, than the US.

          2. To be fair, in much of the world you can be imprisoned for insulting politicians or for expressing unapproved political beliefs.

            At least in the USA they don’t lock you up for insulting the president.

            With as many barriers as our government puts up to prevent economic activity, it’s actually even more difficult in other places to start a business and employ people.

            It could be worse.

    2. Maybe, but I think there is more to it than that. If a child grows up here, they probably shouldn’t be thrown out on their ass and sent away from the only home they have ever known just because they committed one crime.

      1. The patch of ground over which you fell from your mother’s vagina is magic! MAGIC, I SAY!

      2. Maybe, but I think there is more to it than that.

        Someone has a quota to meet this month.

    3. I might still have a problem with the fact that when you do that to someone who emigrated to the US when they were 1, you essentially create a stateless person.

    4. This story has nothing to do with immigration and everything to do with the stupid drug laws.

      Oh, bullshit. It has something to do with both.

  17. King Obama could grant her amnesty and the conviction would still be bullshit

    I already covered this one. Not going to happen, wrong skin color, no hoodie, no amnesty.

  18. 3 months on a 5-year stint? Did I read that right? Obviously someone saw the injustice in this prosecution and did what they could.

    1. What they could obviously not being enough when the feds stepped in. I have to repeat that only in a primitive and barbaric society does this young lady spend even one day in a jail for this non-crime. Anyone who takes part in this bullshit, whether the arresting officer, the judge, anyone should be ashamed of themselves if they had any decency at all.

      1. if they had any decency at all.

        There you go.

  19. from the vid, her sister looks like an asian Rachel Maddow.

  20. I have to say that I find her claim that she instinctively deferred to the police a little self-serving.

    Wouldn’t her instinctive deference to authority have prevented her from committing the crime in the first place?

    After all, I actually support the crime. But even I have to say that once you’ve gone out there and said, “Fuck it, I’m disobeying the law, bitches!” it isn’t all that credible to turn around and say, “I was helpless before my interrogator because of my ingrained respect for the law and authority!”

    1. Wouldn’t her instinctive deference to authority have prevented her from committing the crime in the first place?

      Remember, she was trying to pay back a debt to her mother. In Southeast Asian culture, Mother trumps all.

      1. Until a female (only females) get a mother in law. Then she trumps all, and she is usually a cunt to her DIL because it’s her time to get revenge for getting shit on by her MIL.

        1. That was what my wife was most afraid of when she first met my mom.

    2. It could be. Maybe she assumed that the police were actual rational, thinking people who could not possibly in good conscience enforce absurd laws against victimless crimes.

      1. I agree with Fluffy.

        There are a lot of laws I disagree with, but I don’t expect any special treatment if I tell the officer, “Why yes I am going to pour this antifreeze down my drain!”

        Unfortunatley, Hammer, you’re making a philosophical point. The only answer to your assertion that the cop shouldn’t have enforced a standing law would be to not be a cop.

        I feel sympathy for her, but I’m not that surprised at the outcome.

        The real injustice here is the deportation, not a cop enforcing a law which she clearly admitted she broke.

        1. I agree, and I’m not saying she should’ve expected it, but I don’t think her story diminishes her credibility, just her intelligence.

    3. “I was helpless before my interrogator because of my ingrained respect for the law and authority!”

      I was watching some show where they played experiments on people, and it turns out that we’re hardwired to respect people in a uniform.

      That’s why ‘Stop and Frisk’ is effective.

      People instinctively empty their pockets to the cops because they’re hardwired to do so.

      It actually takes an act of will to disobey that instinct.

      Police know this and take advantage of it all the time.

      1. Yep.

        And the predisposition to reflexively trust authority is a barrier to embracing liberty.

  21. Every single outcome of the drugwar is evil. No exceptions.

  22. “I am not a U.S. citizen; but there is no way I am not an American. The United States of America has always been my home and is my Country.”

    Also, this is why she’s still single. She hasn’t yet learned that sometimes, they just don’t love you back.

  23. My mother came to the US from Japan when she married my father. She has lived in the US for almost 40 years, but she is not an American citizen, but a permanent resident (Green Card holder.) My parents divorced when I was 12, and my dad is the biggest asshole anyone has ever met. My father comes from a wealthy, prominent family. He divorced my mother and screwed her over in alimony and child support. About a year after the divorce, he stopped paying child support for me and my brother. My mom would call him and write him and go to his house to beg him to pay. He got an expensive, prominent attorney and charged her with stalking. My mother couldn’t afford an attorney, and she couldn’t get a public defender, because according to records, she had a lot of alimony and child support income. She pleaded nolo contendere. Luckily, this was before these ridiculous deportation laws. I couldn’t imagine if she had been deported and I had been sent back to live with my abusive father. I used to cry myself to sleep every night when I lived with him…

    1. That sucks for you and your Mother. Glad she is still living in America.

      Your parents made their choices though. Oops.

  24. Thanks for the nut punch.

  25. “The surest way to get rid of a bad law is to strictly enforce it.” ~President Ulysses S. “Stone Cold” Grant

    Of course, I may be giving too much credit to what, in all likelihood, is just a bunch of mindless career bureaucrats.

    1. The unfortunate aspect is that you have to grind through a lot of people before anyone takes notice.

  26. As a Constitutional Conservative with some libertarian leanings; I believe in rule of law and I happen to think that if this young lady had not broken the law —- She would not be getting deported. It is a sad story; but, it should be a reminder that we do have laws, when it comes to drugs and if you break them, you pay the price.

    Again, I hate to sound mean, and I hate to say it, but she brought it on herself.

    -Pat

    1. Since it required a constitutional amendment to give the federal government the power to ban alcohol, perhaps you can point out to me the constitutional amendment that gave the federal government the power to ban ecstasy?

      Because I can’t find it.

      I figure since you’re a constitutional conservative you might be the guy to ask.

    2. Lean harder.

    3. “I hate to sound mean, and I hate to say it….”

      No you don’t. People like you (‘teh law is teh law’) love to be dicks. It’s part of your nature.

    4. “Again, I hate to sound mean, and I hate to say it, but she brought it on herself.”

      That, and because scale, proportion, circumstances, mitigating factors, intent, time, behavior, family, justice and compassion mean nothing to me.

    5. “I’m a twit with no moral compass, and I wait for my masters to tell me right and wrong.”

    6. People like you claiming “libertarian leanings” are why people hate libertarians.

    7. Patrick,
      You’re in no way a libertarian.
      Please stop referring to yourself as such.

    8. I’m really not seeing the difference between law-and-order-douche-Pat in Michigan and the others who are blaming the girl for being stupid. Pat thinks she caused the predicament by breaking THE LAW and the others think she caused her own problems by talking to the cops. Either way, they are not placing blame with the laws and bureaucrats, but with her.

  27. BTW, this should go into the Hall of Fame for “Threads Explaining Why There Aren’t More Female Libertarians”.

  28. “Having been taught to trust the police”, thats the problem right there, sadly she had to learn the hard way, one would think that escaping from Pol Pot one would know these things.

  29. If she were to receive a full pardon, wouldn’t she be off the hook? If so, then everyone who has been commenting on this thread ought to be writing letters to Governor McDonnell demanding that he issue one. (Residents of Virginia should also be e-mailing and making phone calls.)

  30. Todd Akin just checked in.
    He’s heartened by the number of people willing to blame the victim.

  31. If she doesn’t “pick a country” do they just stick her on an innertube in the south pacific?

  32. I would gladly marry this sweet girl and provide her with the legal means to stay in Amerka.

  33. Poor girl. She shouldn’t have been trying to sell ecstasy as a non-citizen, I guess. Oh behold the power of the State!

    Of course I want her to remain in America. I know Americans who are Americans because they’re mother crossed the border and birthed them in the United States. Then they went back across the border to raise and educate the child in the foreign land. The adult American is still learning many English words today. He also served his country in the Marine reserves. The former Marine reservist is arguably less American than this drug dealing Kampuchean.

  34. Khoy served three months and was released for good behavior. http://www.ceinturesenfr.com/c…..-c-24.html She moved back in with her parents, got a job, and enrolled in community college. “I began to accept, forgive, and believe in myself,” writes Khoy, who is now 31. She also completed four years of supervised probation without missing appointments or failing drug tests.

  35. Because of her immigration status and the mistake she made when she was 19, Lundy Khoy could soon be separated from her mother and father and her American-born brother and sister, and deported from the only country she’s ever known.

  36. Another wrinkle to this case that I have not seen discussed – just because the INS is telling her to pick another country doesn’t mean that there exists a country which would take her.

    Cambodia has already said no and it looks like the only other possible candidate would be Thailand. I can’t see them taking a stateless, convicted drug dealer even if the US asks them nicely.

    In this case it sounds like the INS might have problems finding a place willing to accept her.

    1. Gitmo. Sadly.

      1. Our base in Gitmo is technically a part of US jurisdiction so they can’t send her there as a destination for deportation.

        Really, I can see a boat load of countries just telling the INS to fuck off over this silly administrative BS. Maybe Australia might be glad to take her as a politcal refugee simply as an act of compassion.

  37. She committed a crime and did the time. Our current President and an Attorney General are sponsoring an illegal ATF program that sells firearms illegally to Mexican drug cartels and gang members, and a US Border Patrol agent is killed by one of those guns. Obama cites “executive privilege” and tries to make the whole thing “go away”. And instead of the US government actually enforcing existing immigration laws consistently, they let all hell break loose along the Mexican border, then sue US States for trying to do what the US government is supposed to BY LAW, but doesn’t…but hey, this woman has got to go. Are you #@%#^$^ serious?!?

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.