Schools

High School Claims There's an Intruder, Then Brings in Drug Dogs

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Via the Agitator comes this microcosm of the drug war, courtesy of Wolcott High School in Connecticut:

An urgent announcement crackled over the intercom: a threatening intruder was in the building and students were told to immediately take refuge in classrooms.

Doors were locked and police, with dogs, moved in. Students stayed huddled in classrooms where they were told to stay away from the windows.

But what sounded like a frightening situation was just a search for narcotics. Drug-sniffing dogs combed the school while students stayed in locked classrooms, believing that an attacker was roaming the halls.

Lock-down drills are common school policy. You could make a very dubious argument that an intruder drill has to be believable/terrifying to be worthwhile, though incidents of school violence—particularly at the Columbine or Virginia Tech level—are of course wildly over-hyped. You could make a worse argument that children need to be searched and treated like criminals in the name of saving them from life-ruining addiction.

"We wanted to practice," said Superintendent of Schools Joseph McCary. "We said there was a lockdown with an intruder inside. Doors are locked, shades are drawn and the lights are turned off and students are told to move to a corner of the room."

"After 10 minutes we say this is a drill and at that point we started a search for drugs," McCary said. "We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment."

No drugs turned up in the search. An email from the high school to parents explained the event, without mentioning the intruder story. It was described as a "lockdown intervention drill" where "two police dogs swept the hallway lockers, locker rooms and the student parking lot."

Andrew Schneider of the Connecticut Civil Liberties Union thinks this is a bad policy because, among other reasons, "Young people will learn not to trust the police."

Reason on zero tolerance absurdities, on the militarization of police, and on the drug war. And Radley Balko on how dogs are too awesome to be very good at finding drugs.

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176 responses to “High School Claims There's an Intruder, Then Brings in Drug Dogs

  1. Luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuccccccyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy!!!!

    Good stuff. Also, #WINNING Alt Text!

    1. Good stuff. Also, #WINNING Alt Text!

      I’m tellin ya! She learned from the alt-text Zen master Welch and has now surpassed the teacher. AND she appears to be on the Balko beat. What is not to like?

      1. My work here is done.

      2. Thanks, kids. You’re too kind. You’re going to make Matt cry.

  2. “After 10 minutes we say this is a drill and at that point we started a search for drugs,” McCary said. “We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment.”

    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

  3. Andrew Schneider of the Connecticut Civil Liberties Union thinks this is a bad policy because, among other reasons, “Young people will learn not to trust the police.”

    Finally the public education system helps kids learn something valuable.

  4. “We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment.”

    A standard argument of police-state types.

    A normal person would hardly call such bizarre treatment “nurturing” but I suppose that normal people are considered troublemakers nowadays.

    1. DO I HAVE TO HIT YOU TO SHOW YOU HOW MUCH I LOVE YOU?!!

      /nurturing

    2. Who gets nurtured in high school, anyway? All I remember is one humiliation after another. Argh!

      1. Only losers are humiliated. You are inferior.

        You have the courage to tell the masses what no politician told them: you are inferior and all the improvements in your conditions which you simply take for granted you owe to the efforts of men who are better than you.

        ~Ludwig von Mises, letter to Ayn Rand, January 23, 1956

        1. Tiresome troll is tiresome.

          1. You’re ignoring that the City-State nurtures competition — and the hell it creates for so many people like The Art-P.O.G. — in its schools.

            And then libertarian types promote it too. What’s up with that?

            Even though competition is proven time and time again in studies to be inferior to cooperation.

            1. Shut up Rather. It is not funny. And it never was.

            2. Re: White Imbecile,

              Even though competition is proven time and time again in studies to be inferior to cooperation.

              Which is why the lions are so good hunters: the wildebeasts cooperate with them.

              What is sad is your lack of common sense, WI, and also the fact that you would cry like a little girl while being chased by a wolverine if in your “original affluent society” Like a little wussy girl. Waa waa waa.

            3. False dichotomy.
              One who will not seek help is a neurotic.
              One who will not offer help lacks vision.
              One who cannot offer a challenge is no help.
              Cooperation is the compliment of competition.

              1. +1
                Exactly!

            4. Even though competition is proven time and time again in studies to be inferior to cooperation.

              Do you really think that the loosely organized tribal bands gamboling about the hinterlands didn’t compete fiercely for the best hunting grounds and for each others’ women-folk?

            5. 1 counting coup is a competition.

              2 “competition is proven time and time again in studies to be inferior to cooperation.” And yet, in real life the Indians lost, because they couldn’t compete.

              You lose.

              1. I’m going to suck your dick like I’m angry at it.

        2. You nitwits can’t help yourselves, can you? Stop feeding the troll and, eventually, it will lose interest.

      2. Which works better, competition or cooperation? The answer, without equivocation, is cooperation…

        COMPETITION VS. COOPERATION
        by Perry W. Buffington, Ph.D.
        http://www.charleswarner.us/articles/competit.htm

        1. Re: White Imbecile,

          Which works better, competition or cooperation?

          They’re not antagonistic concepts, you stupid twit.

      3. Yeah, but don’t you see, they’re trying to fix that. If you’re able to worry kids 24/7 about armed intruders, you foster in them the tendency to band together in solidarity, where they might otherwise have tended to break up into petty cliques. Thus, you eliminate the source of the typical gossip and back-biting which doubtless otherwise would have taken place amongst them, ultimately a yielding healthier, better-adjusted society.

        1. Nah, they just become tribal and break up into tribal petty cliques. The football players will decide they should lead, the hot chicks will bond with them, and the geeks will be relegated to “cannon fodder”.
          Or, as WI would argue, they’ll cooperate so the fittest/meanest survive.

          1. I’m pretty sure 0X90 was being facetious, but yeah . . . some of the students will take from this the absolute necessity of narcing before they get narced.

      4. do you remember lots of dark sarcasm in the classroom?

        1. do you remember lots of dark sarcasm in the classroom?

          You should take one of my classes.

        2. At times, I felt as though I was just one small part of a monolith…

          1. Wrong, do it again!

        3. Hell yeah. I was providing it.

    3. A bunch of barely trained flat foots running around with weapons drawn is a real safe environment. How long before as student is killed or injured in one of these things? If you draw a weapon enough times, you will eventually use it.

      1. Are you thinking of that one YouTube video? You know the one I’m talking about. I mean, the officer only shot himself, but still.

          1. Ahh, my favorite Glock owner.

        1. That is what immediately came to my mind. He was “the only one in the room trained to handle a ‘Glock 40’…”

          I have to hand it to him, though. After shooting a hole in his foot he stood there and assured the kids that everything was fine.

          1. he was a federal agent, btw. just sayin’

      2. I’m pretty sure that the day-glo orange indicates that the guns are dummy props.

        1. Or else that shotgun barrel could use some serious cleaning.

        2. They look like they came off an arcade cabinet. I really hope this is the case.

        3. Wow, I have never found a Wikipedia commons photos that was TOO relevant before.

          I shouldn’t use photos that imply the police would be sensible enough to use prop guns in a case like this.

          1. Also, black people in Wolcott?

        4. I just saw that. But give them time. Eventually they will need to use real ones. Cops love toys.

          1. They definitely need to progress to live-fire drills – teach the little twerps in their little corners to keep their heads down.

            1. At first I read that as “live fire-drills”. Set the hallways ablaze and lock the kids in so that they don’t hurt themselves when they trip down the stairs. Sadly that seems almost plausible.

        5. Is that an actual photo from the raid or just a stock “cops with guns” photo?

          1. It’s a stock photo from wikipedia.

        6. They are training guns that are replicas of the real thing and have the same weight.

  5. How high were these people when they came up with this plan?

  6. “we wanted to practice.”

    Super. Why not try a tornado drill? All the kids are curled up into little balls, hands over their heads, with their pockets exposed. You can pick ’em up like a 12-pack.

    1. We used to have civil defense drills, where we prepared for an all-out nuclear holocaust by cowering beneath our desks. It wasn’t made clear how that would stop the shock wave or the heat blast or the radiation, or why they thought we might be a nuclear target 130 miles from a major city, but it was a nice break from the ordinary drudgery.

  7. Young people will learn not to trust the POLIce.

    Young people will learn not to trust the metroPOLIs.

    Young people will learn not to trust the POLItics.

    Polis is often translated as “CITY-STATE.”

    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Polis

    Still, libertarians keep holding the contradiction that:

    City-State = Good
    City-State = Evil

    Got blank-out?

    Thinking is man’s only basic virtue, from which all the others proceed. And his basic vice, the source of all his evils, is that nameless act which all of you practice, but struggle never to admit: the act of blanking out, the willful suspension of one’s consciousness, the refusal to think?not blindness, but the refusal to see; not ignorance, but the refusal to know.
    http://aynrandlexicon.com/lexicon/evasion.html

    1. The strawman rebellion will be the end of you

      1. If the similarity of words showed the full essence of things I could go out in my yard, pick all the goldenrods and single-handedly pay off the national debt in the span of a summer.

        1. you do that

      2. “Strawman Rebellion” now that’s a great name for a band.

    2. “Polis is often incorrectly translated as ‘CITY-STATE’, and has nothing to do with the word ‘police’.

      Fyp

  8. I’m glad I graduated before things started getting this ludicrous. The more I hear the more I think my child will be home schooled

    1. Unschool them.

      And piss off Good Morning America.

      Unschooling : How Good Morning America Got It All Wrong
      http://www.huffingtonpost.com/…..43880.html

      1. It’s all starting to make sense now

  9. “that bathroom pass looked like a gun”

    1. You must have missed the news from Woodland Hills, California this year, where a cop in the area shot himself, made up a story about a carjacker, 8 local schools were put on lockdown for 6+ hours, and no one was allowed to leave their rooms to go to the bathroom.

  10. I don’t think “a safe and secure nurturing environment” means what they think it means.

    Presumably these cops want their homes to be safe and secure nurturing environments. Is this how they act at home, too?

    Don’t answer that.

    1. How about we run a drill like this through the police academy.

      1. The POLIS (city-State) has POLICe.

        Always has. Does. Always will.

        This is the contradiction the religio-economic faith of libertarianism teaches you:

        ? City-State (POLIS) = Good
        ? City-State (POLICe) = Evil

        How’s that working out?

        1. Pardon me.
          Can you come back later instead? I use you to bore me to sleep at night. I don’t need a nap this early.
          Thanks.

      2. IIRC, Dick Marcinko claims his SEAL team did a mock terrorist attack in on-base housing during a drill and the brass (not to mention the families living there) were NOT happy about it.

        1. It was Red Cell that did that and not any of the SEAL teams (which was mostly comprised of SEALS and some Marine Force Recon).

          Red Cell used to run drills on Navy and Marine Bases by warning them ahead of time and then sneaking in and attacking them using methods outside of the thinking box issued to regular service members. Demo Dick said that anything was fair to our enemies and that whatever methods he used were the kind of things that a terrorist would. He was extremely successful in his drills as Red Cell’s guerrilla tactics were foreign to the Pentagon’s way of thinking (Red Cell was started back in the early 80’s and the Cold War was the only combat America was comfortable with at the time). The most secure bases in the military were regularly penetrated and even taken over by a small handful of what “Demo Dick” referred to as “Marcinko’s Merry Marauders” playing terrorist.

          The tactic you’re thinking of was called “Chester Chester Child Molester” in which two or three members of Red Cell would put on balaclava masks and run around base housing where all the parents could see them and their guns while they would scream things like “Allah hu akbar” and “We are here for the free ejaculation of Palestine” (no, that wasn’t a typo)! They would beat it once the base security showed up and during the time the base cops were scrambling to figure out what the fuck was going on in housing, the rest of the Red Cell would sneak onto base and raise hell by blowing shit up, taking hostages, and give the Navy what Marcinko liked to call “Excedrin Headache #6”! They even managed to take down Air Force One when old Reagan was in town once. The President wasn’t anywhere near AF1 at the time but the fact that Red Cell not only hit that fucker and did it without ANYONE noticing spoke volumes about security issues during the Cold War.

          It was all simulated but no one ever knew what Red Cell was up to until after they jumped out of the shadows and made Admirals shit themselves. Which actually happened during one drill when Red Cell kidnapped the Admiral in charge of the Mediterranean TWICE right under the nose of NIS (now called NCIS)!

  11. I would add:

    “You could make a befuddling argument that children need their lives ruined by the enforcement system in the name of saving them from life-ruining addiction, should they be partaking in said detrimental behavior.”

  12. Doors were locked and police, with dogs, moved in.

    “Moved in?” That should have been a tip that it was a fake; in real life the SWAT teams would “set up a perimeter” and wait for a few hours before doing anything. The shooters should have finished the killing and committed suicide by then.

    1. Yep. I remember Columbine, too.

      1. that’s primarily what the coward LINE cops did, moreso than the SWAT guys

        it was the incident that precipitated ASAP training

        regardless, those fucking cops were cowards, and even though they were TRAINED to set a perimeter and wait for SWAT, as far as i am concerned, they are still fucking cowards and should have turned in their badges

        when some assmunch(es) are running around a school shooting innocent kids, you go towards the threat.

        period

        you do not set a perimeter and wait for SWAT

        unless you are a cop-o-crat pussy

        1. regardless, those fucking cops were cowards, and even though they were TRAINED to set a perimeter and wait for SWAT, as far as i am concerned, they are still fucking cowards and should have turned in their badges

          It’s funny, because that’s exactly what I thought. If I were a cop, outside a school full of kids and I hear shots going off inside, I’ma go in and try to stop it, even if I lose my job afterward.

          1. Yup. Those fucking coward sickened me. I don’t care what bullshit they got taught in the academy. They should have gone in and those kids’ blood is on their fucking hands. COWARDICE, isn’t excusable there

        2. unless you are a cop-o-crat pussy

          So that explains why ALL of them hesitated.

          1. They primarily did so because the stupid academies taught them to “secure” and wait for SWAT. however, that doesn’t ‘t excuse them. My partner and I got awards for pulling people out of a burning building while a few other cops, security guards, and non-cops stood by and watched. Some fucking asshole fire lieutenant yelled at me that we were SUPPOSED TO wait for fire! I have never come closer to using excessive force and pinching somebody w/o justifictation. I was also too busy. Vomiting from smoke inhalation. Fire-o-carts suck too!

            1. Ugh, punching, not pinching

        3. But they gotta follow “proper procedure” Dunphy. Isnt that what you are always telling us? Cops can do no wrong whey they follow procedure. And of course, “office safety” is of paramount importance. Fuck the little people. They aren’t important like us “only ones”.

          1. That’s false. As usual. I have said that IF THEY FOLOW procedure, the dept. cannot sanction them, nor can they be civilly liable. I have ALSO repeatedly said that morality can take a higher importance than procedure. The fact that you fail to grok this is typical. We don’t write policy or law. But in certain cases, IMO the moral duty is to do something Contrary to policy or even the law. Hth

    2. And how did the police move in after the doors were locked. I smell a rat.

      Also, WOOOOOOOOOOOOLLLLLLLLLFFFFFFFF!

      1. It’s called a battering ram.

        1. Primer cord. It’s a safe and nurturing environment.

    3. Officer safety is key.

      1. Which will be the attitude that will always be what separates the military from police; service members worry about neutralizing the threat while cops worry about going home that day!

        It’s the reason why MOST people across the world think better of their military than their police.

        A soldier risking his life for his fellow man is just part of the job while a cop risking his life for anyone not a fellow officer is a rarity!

        Why do you think the news always makes such a big deal of out the few officers who understand what “to serve and protect” truly means?

  13. Why would a “lockdown” help anything in an actual shooting? Wouldn’t it just keep the kids in their rooms where they’d be sitting ducks? A gunman who is thinking of killing people would probably not be dissuaded from shooting a few locks.

    Am I missing something?

    1. I guess they could slow him down.

    2. No gamboling.

    3. There are stories from shootings where people barricaded doors and the gunman went off to find easier pickings. They often shoot through doors and get a few people first, though.

      But yeah, if it’s official school policy, one shouldn’t assume that it’s the ideal thing to do in a real shooter situation.

      1. If the entire school is locked down, there aren’t going to be easier pickings (and the gunman knows this)

        There are a lot of stories from shootings of people testifying to Jesus before being shot, and they have equal veracity to barricades working in my opinion.

        1. What’s so absurd about people finding (or getting reacquainted with) Jesus in a deadly situation?

          1. You find go ahead and find Jesus!

            I’ll be too busy finding the way out to worry about him!

      2. the recent issaquah incident had a lockdown. and the cops hunted down and shot the guy during the lockdown.

        1. True, and the guy needed killin’, but he wasn’t going for a big body count. He had a rifle, ammo and plenty of targets and didn’t hit a single person. Frankly, he had to have been a hell of a shot to miss everyone he fired at.
          Very strange.

          1. I think he just watched too much a-team where hundreds of rounds get fired and nobody gets hit. Maybe a flesh wound for effect

    4. It wouldn’t. In a real Columbine situation, the thing to do would be have the kids run to the four winds to safety. The worst think you could do would be to put them all in rooms where they can’t get away and have no way to defend themselves.

      Yet, this is exactly what the schools will do. I can’t even begin to explain that kind of stupidity except to say that they must be so drunk with power they would rather see the kids die than do anything out of the school’s control.

      1. they must be so drunk with power they would rather see the kids die than do anything out of the school’s control

        I believe you are correct.

      2. I know this is really cynical, but I sometimes wonder if they’re trying to discourage any independent thought even in the most dangerous and chaotic situations. I have certainly heard anti self-defense nutters insist that the only thing one should do in a dangerous situation is sit tight and wait for the “authorities” to tell you what to do, even though nature has already given you a good answer in the fight/flight response.

        1. I think you are right. They really don’t want the kids thinking they can do anything at all without the school’s permission. You really must have to be a sick bastard to be a school administrator.

          1. “”They really don’t want the kids thinking they can do anything at all without the school’s permission.””

            That’s probably it. I think it comes from the idea that he school is responsible for their safety so the school wants them to play it their way.

            1. under “in loco parentis” case law, to a large extent, the school *is* responsible for their safety.

        2. That doesn’t sound cynical to me, it sounds about right.

          1. when it comes to the war on drugs, cynical and “about right” aren’t mutually exclusive. they go together quite often. also, add in “stupid”, “counterproductive” and “injurious to civil liberties”

            1. And you get cops. Like you Dunphy.

              1. Smooches! And cops will be there with or without the war on drugs. Fortunately, I only have to spend a tiny amount of time on drug enforcement bullshit. But many of us would be happier if ma was legalized, and an overall harm reduction pattern was used.

      3. Indeed. It’s almost identical to having kids hide under their desks for a fire. It doesn’t protect you from shit when the danger is inside the building.

        1. Huh? I don’t recall any fire drill that had us hide under desks. Are you sure you aren’t mixing it up with duck and cover drills for nuclear bombs in the 50s or earthquakes. Useless but not making things worse.

          1. No, I’m saying it would be as stupid as having kids hide under their desks for a fire drill, which is so obviously stupid no one would suggest it. Yet they do just that for “intruder drills,” when safety is similarly to be found by getting out of the building.

            1. ime, most lockdowns occur when there is a perceived threat OUTSIDE the school, btw. not inside it. this is what i have seen in dozens of such incidents.

              frankly, if we would allow teachers to be armed that would be a good thing btw, but statistically speaking, kids are safer at school than coming to or from, or at home. and more kids die in school sports than school shootings.

              1. From the article: “An urgent announcement crackled over the intercom: a threatening intruder was in the building and students were told to immediately take refuge in classrooms”

                My concern is that lockdown is a more or less automatic response, regardless of whether it is appropriate or not.

                Of course, there is the additional factor that in this case the officials were lying to the kids in order to pull a drug search. So maybe they wouldn’t be dogmatically stupid about lockdowns. But I’m not optimistic.

                1. yea, let’s remember 1) this is ONE case. lockdowns are usually done (we hear them over the police radio frequently e.g. “they are locking down X high school due to Y” and it’s ALMOST always based on an EXTERNAL threat

                  2) this wasn’t even a real threat.

                  the war on drugs was bad enough. playing security theater to get away with some stupid drug raid via this lockdown was some pretty fucking egregious bullshit

              2. Sorry, I’ve known too many teachers. I don’t want them armed.

      4. Add to it that modern schools are designed to prevent easy egress via fixed windows and few exits (no more than required by fire code). It’s pretty much a recipe for columbine.

      5. When I was in high school some high achiever in a mask came in and robbed the book room. Since his only interaction with a student was trying to steal some girl’s purse in the hall when he came in, I’m not sure what the lockdown accomplished other than wasting a lot of time.

      6. Sending the kids to flee to the four winds means some of them will get shot as a direct result of your advice; some of them will be unfortunate enough to flee through an area occupied by the shooter.

        That’s bad for liability. Locking them in the rooms shows that you took measures to protect them, so the resulting deaths won’t be considered the school’s fault.

        1. Really, when it comes to liability suits, you’re damned if you do, damned if you don’t.

        2. Yeah, a few of them might get shot. But a lot fewer than if you round them up and put them in one place where the shooter can get to them. If they have an intruder and do not allow kids to flee but instead lock them in a room to be killed, you are most certainly negligent.

          I am sure your theory is what they think. But it is gold standard stupidity.

          1. i think we are engaging in speculation here

            do you have stats to show that lockdowns are more (or less) likely to result in greater casualty #’s?

            lockdowns may work BEFORE a shooter gets in a school. recall that a lockdown means the doors are locked so as to bar ENTRY.

            anyway, there are lockdowns all the time. they did it in issaquah just a few weeks ago while the cops hunted down and shot the guy

            1. The lock on a door doesn’t bar the entry to someone with a gun.

              1. It’s harder to breach a door with no training than you might think, and a hell of lot harder with a pistol or a rifle. There’s a reason the door man carries a 12 gauge.

                1. I thought you were supposed to use an axe.

            2. In this case, the (fictitious) intruder was inside the building.

            3. The assumption is that the shooter is in the school in this drill in which case this order probably demonstrates that the school can’t evacuate the kids without entering the corridors. Schools and prisons, lots of similarities

              1. most buildings don’t have doors to the outside in every room. It has nothing to do with imprisoning people, just limiting potential entry points for nighttime burglars and saving on heating bills.

      7. the thing to do would be have the kids run to the four winds

        Official announcement of “threatening intruder” and I’m unarmed? I’d have been so long gone! Luvya, buh-bye! Feel free to climb out after me!

    5. You’re missing nothing. The New America is you sit in the corner of your room with the lights off, not allowed to defend yourself (guns are bad, mmkay?) and pray that the police set up their perimeter and wait for the shooting to stop fast enough to save you.

  14. This is just terrible.

    But I find it amazing that they didn’t find any drugs. At a high school.

    They did something like this at my old school (fortunately well after I graduated) several years ago, except there was no ruse, they just made everyone leave the building, leaving any bags behind, and stand in the football field for an hour. They also didn’t find any drugs. My theory is that the people who organize this sort of thing do it not to actually find any drugs, but to train the students to be used to submitting to random exercises of authority.

    1. Wow. Where I grew up we had an annual spring “narc raid” at the school that always netted a couple of kids selling dope out in the parking lot. I’m stunned they didn’t find anything.

      1. I’m stunned they didn’t find anything.

        I’m not. These kids are now trained to expect random exercises of authority. They’re too smart for that shit.

    2. Well, if the cops were checking lockers they probably didn’t know which ones were owned by minorities so they couldn’t tell when to force their dogs to alert.

      Or, you know, kids are smarter than you think and leave their drugs at home(or ingest them before 1st period). If I were a kid today I doubt I’d be carrying at school – I’d keep it off campus where I’d still have some rights.

    3. They didn’t find any drugs because they used drug dogs.

  15. Andrew Schneider of the Connecticut Civil Liberties Union thinks this is a bad policy because, among other reasons, “Young people will learn not to trust the police.”

    A more accurate way of describing the situation is that students have uncontroversial and unequivocal corroboration for their current mistrust.

  16. Lock-down drills are common school policy.

    Not when I attended. Then again, public school appears to have turned into minimum-to-medium security prison facilities since then.

    “We wanted to practice,” said Superintendent of Schools Joseph McCary. “We said there was a lockdown with an intruder inside. Doors are locked, shades are drawn and the lights are turned off and students are told to move to a corner of the room.”

    So if there was an intruder, that person would have easy target practice as all of the students would be piled into a corner. A strategy worthy of Sun Tzu.

    “After 10 minutes we say this is a drill and at that point we started a search for drugs,” McCary said. “We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment.”

    A safe and nuturing environment. Nothing says safe and nuturing like random cell locker tosses, drawn weapons and large dogs.

    1. Nothing says safe and nuturing like random cell locker tosses, drawn weapons and large dogs.

      Don’t forget, it all starts with a lie about “intruders”.

      They should have just made the announcement that armed intruders would be entering the building shortly, accompanied by large dogs, and that it would be safest for everyone if the students just locked themselves in their rooms. Wouldn’t want any “accidents”, now, would we?

  17. http://www.nydailynews.com/new…..rison.html

    Reasons why I support the death penalty. It bothers me for this guy to be breathing my air.

  18. “We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment.”

    McCary needs to be provided the safe and secure nurturing environment of a prison.

  19. Young people will learn not to trust the police.

    Feature, not bug.

    1. exactly

  20. “We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment.”

    Yay, Newspeak!

  21. I shouldn’t use photos that imply the police would be sensible enough to use prop guns in a case like this.

    Very good.

    1. I agree. Although they would not have had their guns drawn while the dog sniffed lockers. It was aloe choice of stock photos. The orange guns suggest an ASAP shrill. We use is munition guns for such drills. Those fucking little paint bullets hurt

  22. What would happen if some brighter-than-average student heaved a chair through a window and organized an escape; would they expel him?

    1. You even have to ask?

    2. Expelled, prosecuted, put on the sex offender list. Next!

      1. Yeah. I figure if this were a high school kid who still retained enough initiative and self-confidence to do such a thing, he would already have been labeled a “troublemaker” and the paperwork would already be done and just waiting for a signature.

        1. If I could, I would hat tip anyone who makes “Red Dawn” references.

    3. Independent thinking and resistance to authority is unacceptable.

    4. He’d be lucky to get his diploma while in prison.

    5. This is why I never did well in school.

    6. This is why the phrase “shot while trying to escape” was invented. Anybody fleeing would be presumed guilty.

  23. Kind of a racist picture.

    1. No shit. Why don’t the black officers get real guns like whitey?

      1. those are beanbag guns.

  24. You even have to ask?

    We call them “rhetorical” questions, out here in the wilderness.

  25. This definitely explains why they insist on gun free campuses.

    OFFICER SAFETY

    1. there are NO gun free campuses. there are only campuses where law abiding people are prohibited from carrying

      heck, at least in WA, the law does allow people (other than cops) to carry on college campuses. they can carry on high school and grade school campuses when they come to pick up their kids IF they stay int he car with the gun

  26. Stories like this make me wish I had kids, so I could take them out of the public schools permanently and tell the principal and the school board why.

  27. This stuff is alien to me. I didn’t have metal detectors or police at school when I was a kid. I don’t understand it, and I especially do not understand people who send their children to such schools. If you are willing to subject your kid to government treatment then I really have doubts about your belief in the ideas expressed in our country’s founding documents.

    I look at this sort of thing and I say to myself, “Self, this is where the cattle that put up with TSA groping come from. And Self, I’ll tell ya another thing – this is where many of the unemployable come from, and why colleges now spend most of their instructional time compensating for the educational failure of American K-12 government schools.”

    1. We didn’t have artificial lines drawn upon the land to restrict people’s movement when I was a kid.

      1. You’re ten thousand years old?

        That explains the dementia.

      2. “We didn’t have artificial lines drawn upon the land to restrict people’s movement when I was a kid.”

        What makes them artificial?

  28. Property owners don’t want drugs near their property. It lowers property value.

    Cops and prosecutors know on which side their bread is buttered.

    1. I took a shit in someone’s living room just recently!

    2. I can tell you that amongst the top complaints at community meetings that we (cops) here is “do something about the drug house down the street”! Iow, neighbors don’t care about discreet drug users. They care about those that have a constant stream of customers and/those who steal from their neighbors to support their habit.

      During the height of the crack epidemic, there was immense community pressure to get the dealers off the street.

  29. “Doors are locked, shades are drawn and the lights are turned off and students are told to move to a corner of the room.”

    Hmm. That’s a pretty good start, and very thoughtful of them, but I think it still places too much burden on the shooter. Who is, after all, going to be quite busy.

    I suggest installing a large gong that shooter can use to conveniently summon the desired number of sacrificial Eloi to a conveniently located Action Zone. This way there’s only one room for the unionized custodial staff to clean up, and the event can be timed so as to avoid inconvenience to teachers or administrators.

  30. “We are providing a safe and secure nurturing environment.”

    Mission accomplished. NOT.

  31. …is the root of all Police Praxeology, to protect property values.

    Drugs lower property values. Bums lower property values.

    Let the libertarian cop beatings begin!

    Cops must be unleashed, and allowed to administer instant punishment … unleash the cops to clear the streets of bums and vagrants. Where will they go? Who cares? ~Murray Rothbard

    1. Drugs lower property values? Which is worth more? An acre of grass or an acre of poppies?

      1. Renting to drug dealers and criminals can not only lower your property value, but the property value of the surrounding homes as well.

        Is my tenant dealing drugs?
        How do I keep drug dealers out of my rental property?
        http://propertymanagementcentr…..ug_dealer_

    2. I love penis, and I get money when I love them in the truck stop bathroom stalls.

  32. “Young people will learn not to trust the police.”

    One can only dream that will be the case. I fear that what will really happen is that they will become conditioned to accept that it is ok for the police to first lie to them, and then under the premise of a lie, search their property. It all starts with the locker searches and metal detectors in the schools and ends with the Fourth Amendment being null and void.

    1. Officer, am I free to gambol about forest and plain?

  33. Conditioning the kiddies for life in my New Order Fascist Amerika.

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