Drug Policy

They Put Their Weed In It

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Chicago gets tough on drugs:

Tiny plastic bags used to sell small quantities of heroin, crack cocaine, marijuana and other drugs would be banned in Chicago, under a crackdown advanced Tuesday by a City Council committee. Ald. Robert Fioretti (2nd) persuaded the Health Committee to ban possession of "self-sealing plastic bags under two inches in either height or width," after picking up 15 of the bags on a recent Sunday afternoon stroll through a West Side park.

Lt. Kevin Navarro, commanding officer of the Chicago Police Department's Narcotics and Gang Unit, said the ordinance will be an "important tool" to go after grocery stores, health food stores and other businesses.

Next year, look for a ban on bags "slightly larger than those we banned last year."

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  1. That’s just absurd. Seriously?

  2. hmm, lighters and matches get used to light joints so if we only …(etc)

  3. Apparently it is impossible to sell drugs in sandwich bags.

  4. Lt. Kevin Navarro, commanding officer of the Chicago Police Department’s Narcotics and Gang Unit, said the ordinance will be an “important tool” to go after grocery stores, health food stores and other businesses.

    “Grocery stores, health food stores and other businesses” need “going after?”

    Sometimes I imagine we live in a quasi-free society. Then I am disabused of the notion by forthright government officials like Lt. Navarro.

  5. The proliferation of the mini-baggie has allowed the “paper bindle” to fall out of favor with average drug users. I predict a return of the paper bindle. Ah, the good old days.

    A paper bindle is an oragami baggie used for cocaine and heroin back in the day.

  6. They put their weed in film canisters (perhaps they have a different name now that people don’t buy rolls of film?). They put their cocaine in little baggies.

  7. I think when Lt. Navarro said “go after,” he meant “harass those we don’t like” and “forfeit/extort money from the others.”

  8. More laws, dammit!

    We’re never going to win the war on drugs unless we pass more laws, ban more stupid things, and put more people in prison.

  9. “They Put Their Weed In It”

    That must have been one of the funniest SNL skits I’ve ever seen. Right up there with “in a van down by the river.”

    Good times.

  10. cartman, don’t forget sticks… you could rub them together…

  11. Few things here:

    1. I am, of course, not in favor of this for a zillion different reasons.

    2. When I go golfing at Columbus Park, a Chicago Park District course on the west side, I see hundreds of these little baggies, or rather I used to, when I still golfed.

    3. What the hell is the legal use for these baggies?

  12. The use of these baggies is to permit us to bring liquids on to airplanes. The whole idea is for one branch of government to forbid them, and another to require them. That way we’ll always be criminals, no matter what we do. Clever, isn’t it?

  13. 3. What the hell is the legal use for these baggies?

    1) Storing small parts like screws or washers.
    2) Barbie brown bag lunch.

  14. They package saffron in those baggies.

  15. There are a million reasons I love my city. And then there’s crap like this.

    Let’s see… We banned handguns and now there are no shootings.

    We banned spray paint and now there’s no graffiti.

    Clearly once we ban little baggies there will be no more drugs.

  16. “We need to use every measure that we possibly can to stop it because it is destroying our kids,” he said.

    OOP! There it is! How could you leave that part out, Radley?

  17. I’m boned. Our family uses a lot of small bags to store everything from screws to thread. If I journey to Chicago I will suddenly become grossly disorganized.

    On the hand, perhaps they have a point. After all, the rise of drugs since the 60’s does correlate with the increased use of plastic bags of all kinds.

  18. Wow, that name was totally from a different thread and I promise it has a context.

    Here’s the other thread

  19. zig zag man,

    A paper bindle is an oragami baggie used for cocaine and heroin back in the day.

    Great now my connection will be asking, “paper or plastic.” Parental drug education will say that being skilled at folding paper is warning sigh of drug use. Japanese Americans will be busted right and left.

  20. “””3. What the hell is the legal use for these baggies?”””

    I use them for misc. screws and misc electronic parts.

    Of course it doesn’t matter if there is a legit reason for use. They are legal to sell and legal to own.

  21. This will only affect the average user. To make a real difference they should ban bigger sizes – sandwich, quart, gallon – to punish people selling keys, pounds, ounces, etc.

    And while we’re at it, let’s come up with a list of all other every day items that could be used as paraphernalia, and ban it all. I’ll start:
    – soda and beer cans
    – faucet screens
    – spoons
    – apples, potatoes, etc.
    – dollar bills (or hundred dollar bills, for the flashy coke fiends)
    – razor blades, exacto knives, jewel cases
    – tea pots
    – all chemistry vials, flasks and pipettes
    – brownie mix

  22. But what if they outlaw bindles next? Won’t somebody think of the hobos?!?!

  23. 3. What the hell is the legal use for these baggies?

    Small quantities of just about everything. Someone upstream mentioned saffron. They are essential for organizing and storing beads, and because they are transparent you can dispense with a label. Here at work we have a small set screw that customers routinely lose. If I were to just drop the tiny screw into an envelope, I would guess at least 50% would be lost again. Put it in a tiny, nearly weightless, see-through bag that seals and can be resealed — now we have a tool that does the job right!

  24. Prediction: this law won’t give any drug dealer the slightest inconvenience, but will certainly help the Chicago PD arrest and deport several first generation immigrant shopkeeprs that were unaware of the law

  25. I bought baggies that size to put board games pieces in. Specifically, to segregate out the pieces for Puerto Rico, in order to make it easier to set up.

  26. “They put their weed in film canisters (perhaps they have a different name now that people don’t buy rolls of film?). They put their cocaine in little baggies.”

    Not true. I live in the ghetto. Neighboprs deal (well, until a rival gang torched their house). They sold weed tightly packed in those teeny bags.

    Granted, the law is stupid, but people do in fact sell weed in tiny bags.

  27. May I add to the list:

    double-album covers (for sifting out pot seeds),
    hemostats,
    binder clips,
    tampon wrappers (in a pinch, so to speak),
    tin foil (improvised pipe & coke transport)

  28. I knew of the hardware use for these baggies. I s’pose what I was wondering is why are corner stores selling them. Is there a reason other than the crack and the nickels and dimes?

  29. Shannon Love: You’re boned?

    also: PARAPHENALIA!

  30. When I go golfing at Columbus Park, a Chicago Park District course on the west side, I see hundreds of these little baggies…

    Thanks to this new law the golf course may end up littered with hundreds of rubbers!

  31. May I add to the list:

    Empty toilet paper rolls

    Plastic soda bottles

    A golf ball (I’m not kidding! I found a golf ball in my yard that had two holes drilled into it in order to make a one-hitter. The smoke hole was even beveled!)

  32. 3. What the hell is the legal use for these baggies?

    Many of my coats/suits had spare buttons in baggies like this.

    My jeweler uses them for rings and earrings and bracelets.

    I use them to store small nuts and bolts at home.

    I also sometimes buy weed in them 🙂

    When I read the article in the local Sun-Times this morning this part really stuck out:

    Prior to the final vote, Ald. Walter Burnett (27th) expressed concern about arresting innocent people. He noted that extra buttons that come with suits, shirts and blouses — and jewelry that’s been repaired — come in similar plastic bags.

    Burnett was reassured by language that states “one reasonably should know that such items will be or are being used” to package, transfer, deliver or store a controlled substance. Violators would be punished by a $1,500 fine.

    Uhmm..what?

    The alderman who actually objected with some common sense was reassured by the fact that states people should know that such items might be used for illegal activity? What does that even mean?

  33. They’re going to have to shut down the hardware aisles in Home Depot and Lowes.

  34. Again, the paper bag lobby strikes!

    What about pockets? Without pockets, where will drugs be stashed? Stop the madness!

  35. They would also have to ban apples and soda cans. The soda can pipe was my favorite WeedGuyver trick.

  36. So there will be a black market…in ziploc bags.

    I really, really wish politicians could be forced to go on television when they proposed a law and be viciously and relentlessly heckled if the law was stupid or unconstitutional.

  37. Epi,

    We could do it as a traveling sideshow.

  38. Thanks to this new law the golf course may end up littered with hundreds of rubbers!

    Ugh. It already is. I don’t think they were used for drugs, tho.

  39. I think that means if you’re a shopkeeper in a drug infested or drug traffic area they assume that it is reasonable that you would know it’s for drug use. Total BS, I doubt the law will survive very long.

  40. highnumber,

    You should just play disc golf. You never have to worry about any of us having sex.

  41. Well, I was going to suggest deathmatches but that isn’t really very non-initiation of force of me.

  42. I think this is a win for drug users. It will encourage larger serving sizes.

  43. They once littered some of the westside streets where the whores worked, when I first move to NYC. We called them little johns.

    Don’t step on the little john!

  44. Oooh, having to import those little bags from the suburbs or the internet is gonna add pennies to the cost of each transaction.

    Or maybe inspire some entrepreneur to come up with little baggies that are exactly two inches in height and width, and thus not subject to the ban — until they up it to two inches, in which case 2.1″ X 2.1″, and then …

    If you think this arms race won’t happen, it already did here in Hawaii when the legislature tacked on a new tax *cough cough bullshit* “recycling fee” on certain size bottles, and consumers shifted to bigger size bottles — I think we’re on the third upgrade in taxed sizes of bottles by now.

    When I did a floor speech for the politician I worked for, I suggested he point out that the existing 72 ounce bottles could be relabeled as holding 72.1 ounces, without changing the actual bottle size at all, and thus subvert the law.

  45. You can, of course, just order them off of the Internet. 1.5×2 plastic bags are for sale, along with a variety of other sizes:

    http://www.uline.com/Browse_Listing_209.asp?desc=Uline+2+Mil+White+Reclosable+Bags

  46. Jesus H Christ…

    I am a beader, I buy special beads from the local crafts store and that’s exactly the size plastic bag that is used for beads that are unique or few in number. This is yet again something dumber than a hundred head of sheep. The “blackmarket” on people hopping in cars and driving to the next town to get them..I can’t even rant…*shakes head and walks away*…

    Wait, I can say this…are they going to ban magazines, too, because before drug dealers discovered these handy little containers..they were these neat little bundles of coke wrapped in magazine pages..er…so I’ve heard anyway…

  47. What about pockets? Without pockets, where will drugs be stashed? Stop the madness!

    That was my first thhought this morning when I read the article: ProLib get outta my head!!

    So there will be a black market…in ziploc bags.

    ZipLocs aren’t cost effective. Instead they will wrap stuff in Saran Wrap — much cheaper and they can cut it to the exact size they want it.

    For personal use, I used to go with the cellophane from cigarette packs when I still smoked cigs.

  48. 2. When I go golfing at Columbus Park, a Chicago Park District course on the west side, I see hundreds of these little baggies, or rather I used to, when I still golfed.

    3. What the hell is the legal use for these baggies?

    Perhaps golf tees come in them. 😉

  49. Those rubbers are reusable. You just have to shake the f*ck outt’ve em.

  50. Oh’ com’n capelza….ur not a beader

    ur a stonehead

  51. We use those things all of the time to cart around goldfish crackers, raisins, and cheerios for our 2 year old. They are pretty convenient and less wasteful than the bigger bags.

    The little sacrifices we make for the children!

  52. I really, really wish politicians could be forced to go on television when they proposed a law and be viciously and relentlessly heckled if the law was stupid or unconstitutional.

    Episiarch,

    I hit upon a couple of those types of wishes in my libertarian president to-do list:

    66. The Vice President and I will host a weekly TV show called Mystery Congressional Theater 2009, where we will review, rate, and mock major Congressional speeches and bills over the past week.

    96. Give each member of Congress his own Secret Service escort. Every time a Congressman tries to violate the Constitution, his Secret Service escort will slap him.

    There are others, but these seemed the most apropos. No reason they can’t work (with some changes) for a libertarian governor. . .or mayor ?

  53. brotherben wins the thread

  54. It’s a joke, right ?

    Is the City Council always in session ? Maybe they get bored to death and invent laws in order to have something to repeal.

    Sometimes I miss the Cold War … then I was able to dismiss this as CP propaganda.

  55. What about pockets? Without pockets, where will drugs be stashed? Stop the madness!

    Suddenly Star Trek is making sense to me…

  56. Oooh, having to import those little bags from the suburbs or the internet is gonna add pennies to the cost of each transaction.

    Given that Chicago’s sales tax will soon increase to 10.5%, they may break even.

    On a side note, Palatine is actually looking into seceding from Cook County to avoid the recently-passed sales tax increase, since they (unlike the Cook County commissioners) recognize it will hurt the local economy.

  57. Congressional Reform Act of 2008; The Designated Hitter Rule:

    The designated hitter stands behind every speaker during the introduction of a new bill — the designated hitter is named by the opposing party. Whenever the speaker makes and unsubstantiated, unsupported claim, the designated hitter will bop the speaker on the heady with a large rubber mallet. If the speaker introduces a clearly unconstitutional clause to any proposed legislation, the designated hitter may use a Louisville Slugger in place of the rubber mallet.

  58. Now that’s a Designated Hitter Rule I can get behind.

  59. PRO-TIP: : Replacement buttons for clothing come in these baggies. Perfect sizes for illicit goods.

  60. Oh, yeah. That’ll do the trick.

    No way the dealers can get around that.

    Good job, Councilor!

  61. Actually, paraphernalia is correct, not paraphenalia or paraphanalia. I was surprised, too:

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/paraphernalia

  62. If only we could get RFIDS in everything…

    Seriously – I don’t believe in this drug war or employer drug testing.

    BUT –

    Oh would it be that the lawmakers were forced to undergo random drug or intelligence testing, as opposed to someone who sweeps the floors at wal-mart.

    One of those two examples represents an authority that has much more power.

    Besides – I once heard a doctor say someone who has a job of sweeping floors should probably have some drugs:)

  63. Sorry, but I read that as the Designated Hitler rule.

  64. I too use those little baggies for board game components. Effectively, this legislator wants to ban “things that can be used to hold small quantities of other things.” This won’t end well.

  65. Sorry, but I read that as the Designated Hitler rule.

    I would so start watching baseball if they had one of these.

  66. Designated Hitler rule.

    See alternate definition for Bush Administration.

  67. And they wonder why Americans are obese. It’s all of this supersizing!

  68. I knew of the hardware use for these baggies. I s’pose what I was wondering is why are corner stores selling them. Is there a reason other than the crack and the nickels and dimes?

    Pack a lunch. You don’t need a sandwich bag for chips, cookies, raisins, trail mix, etc. And they’re perfect for saving a dirty plastic spoon. Or sugar/salt/pepper packets. Or tea bags, wet or dry.

    I really, really wish politicians could be forced to go on television when they proposed a law and be viciously and relentlessly heckled if the law was stupid or unconstitutional.

    Or a third grade classroom. Third graders are relentless.

  69. So if the cops in Chicago do succeed in “going after” grocery stores and health food stores, perhaps there will be a market for a new book: “101 Ways to Cook a Dead Pig.”

  70. I s’pose what I was wondering is why are corner stores selling them.

    Because people will pay for them.

    What uses will people put them to? None of your fucking business.

    Lt. Kevin Navarro, commanding officer of the Chicago Police Department’s Narcotics and Gang Unit, said the ordinance will be an “important tool” to go after grocery stores, health food stores and other businesses.

    Because tracking down and arresting criminals is hard.

  71. Oh, and let’s not miss the irony of the phrases “commanding officer of the Chicago Police Department’s Narcotics and Gang Unit” and “important tool” in the same sentence.

  72. You know, this would all be solved if the private sector weren’t selling all of these sundry goods. It would be better if the government controlled all points of distribution, so that we’d only have access to the appropriate products. Also, consumers will benefit socially while they stand in long lines to get their authorized bread and toilet paper.

  73. LarryA @ 5:08

    The audience will out IQ the presenters.

  74. Im in your grosseree

    bagging your treez

  75. LarryA,
    These bags (I’m thinking of the really tiny ones – usually tinted blue) are too small for the purposes you mention.

    R C Dean,
    I’m fucking curious, you cranky fuck. I don’t care if it’s none of my fucking business.

  76. Sweet. I’ve already got a truckload of tiny plastic baggies lined up to take to Chicago. Once the Prohibition kicks in I’ll make a fortune!

  77. Honestly, how else will Chicago cops carry around their spare donuts? Don’t laugh, I lived in downtown Chicago. I know. All those stereotypes–they’re true.

  78. Just ban containers.

    Interpret that as you will.

  79. Forget heroin and cocaine. Find out what the cops are on, and ban that.

  80. These bags (I’m thinking of the really tiny ones – usually tinted blue) are too small for the purposes you mention.

    highnumber,

    the reality is that there are many legitimate uses for even the small (nickel/dime bag size) ones.

    Many have been mentioned above. But regardless of how many or how legitimate one considers these uses, the big problems is how misguided this all is.

    This whole belief that somehow making it difficult/impossible for people to get these baggies will somehow impact drug use/sales is laughable.

    It’s the DRM approach to law enforcement. Basically they are trying to pass a law that wont affect rug sellers/buyers (there are plenty of alternative ways of packaging…plastic wrap being a pretty obvious one) but will make it that much more expensive and a burden on law abiding citizens who use them for non-illegal reasons.

    Like ProLib said upthread…it makes as much sense to ban these as it does to ban pockets. In fact, a ban on pockets would probably be more effective.

  81. Tom,

    I don’t disagree with any of that. I’m just curious about corner stores selling them. They don’t sell them for your washers and your buttons. They don’t sell them to hold a tea bag for your lunch.
    I’m not in favor of banning them even if there is no legal reason for the food & liquor to sell them. I’m simply curious – are other uses that I’m not aware of, or are they sold strictly for the crack dealer on the corner? It’s an interesting niche for the shop owners to have hit on.

  82. Effectively, this legislator wants to ban “things that can be used to hold small quantities of other things.” This won’t end well.

    It’s the perfect size for their brains!

  83. People use drugs. Lets just ban people from being in Chicago.

  84. There’s a much more serious risk of letting people use these baggies: wildlife can choke and suffocate on them. So if you discard them, you should cut them in half and make sure they wind up in a proper receptacle. Why don’t they just arrest people who leave them lying around?

    There is a bright side to the ban. I’m hoping they will bring back the little glass medicine bottles, which make great guitar slides.

  85. “every measure that we possibly can.”

    Might I recommend public beheading for casual users? Because I really think that would finally do it. It might require a Constitutional amendment, but heck, that’s something we “possibly can” do. You might even say that not publicly beheading casual drug users is itself “destroying our kids.”

  86. 3. What the hell is the legal use for these baggies?

    If you collect action figures, you can also use these little bags to keep the accessories for the figures in the little bags (like the little Star Wars guns). Especially useful if you sell them.

    Also for spare washers, nuts, bolts, knobs. (If you have need for a bunch of things like that, you can store spare parts in bags and lable them as to what the parts go to and then keep them in a safe place.)

    Also useful for herbs, beads, incense cones… but if you’re into that stuff, you’re probably a pothead anyway.

  87. Suddenly I’m getting a flashback on Phil Hartman doing the Anal-Retentive Chef.

  88. Everybody gets to one certain comment then adds their own. Very few people read all the way down before adding their precious, precious information.

  89. More contraband:
    Cardboard
    Straight pins
    Plastic cups
    Plastic straws

    I know for a fact that these items have been used to abuse a cannabis derivative.

  90. Hey highnumber, here’s some precious, precious information for you: you’re a dickhead. But everyone is already aware of that.

  91. I wonder how this ban would be enforced.

    Would the police use the paperbag test to determine probable cause.

  92. Inpired by SPI’s packaging, I too used them for game pieces. Andy they’re available all over the place on the ground!

  93. The tiny bags were known as “coin bags”, sold by coin shops. As if.

  94. “I’m simply curious – are other uses that I’m not aware of, or are they sold strictly for the crack dealer on the corner? It’s an interesting niche for the shop owners to have hit on.”

    People in the ghetto can’t have spare buttons or screws they need the baggies for?

    The corner store is the easiest place to buy just about everything for some people. If you live in an urban area, big box stores and large grocery stores aren’t always easy to get to, especially if you don’t have a car. You’d be amazed at the kinds of things sold at some bodegas – cake mix, twine, tools, porno – something for everyone.

  95. Ban everything except ( please,please ) don’t put caps on CEO compensation.

  96. Chicago would be an awesome city if it weren’t so consistently fucking retarded

  97. The reason everyone thinks thst’s stupid is because the problem isn’t in their neighborhood. Do we actually think that people are buying these to store their mini-sandwiches? The harder it is for drug-dealers and users the better.

  98. highnumber,

    The purpose that the corner stores sell them for is: To make money. They dont give a damn what the buyers use them for. Maybe they know, maybe not. All they care about is that they bring income into their store.

  99. @zeelow:

    yes, like it’s so incredibly hard to go to Cicero, buy them there, and bring them back into the city. Or just wrap the drugs in paper.

  100. Even worse, the larger bags are being used to carry the children they’re selling to buy the drugs.

    Won’t someone please think of the children???

  101. …people who collect beads…
    …people who buy scrapbooking paper piecings…
    …people who collect stamps…
    …people who sell coins…

    OOH, I KNOW! PEOPLE WHO ARE GOING TO BE ARRESTED IN CHICAGO UNDER A STUPID NEW LAW!

    Ding Ding Ding

  102. When baggies are outlawed, only outlaws will have baggies.

    Aw, c’mon… someone was bound to say it sooner or later.

    On a more serious note, has anyone come up with a viable means of interstellar transport yet? The urge to vacate this effed-up planet becomes stronger with each passing day.

  103. All of you have it wrong! Using the same logic, here is what I believe is the solution.

    All cities that have drug problems also have City Council’s, thus City Council’s must the universl problem and must be banned!

    ———-

    Solution to the weed problem is to legalize selling it in stores and tax the heck out of it so it will lower our taxes.

    You must have a commercial growers license to grow it, otherwise it would be illegal. It would be illegal to purchase weed from an individual.

    Make it cheap enough that most people would rather go to the store to buy it rather than risk going to jail.

    It was proven in the 1930’s that alcohol prohibition didn’t work. The bottom line is that no matter how bad you want to ban something, you will never stop it from being sold! Fing get over it and just legalize it!

  104. Lt. Kevin Navarro, commanding officer of the Chicago Police Department’s Narcotics and Gang Unit, are you in a Clown suit when you say these thing? Are you high on Drugs? or Are you just wigging out? Getting rid of plastic baggies!! Hum Sounds like the the wind blowing between his ears. Take a look you can see right through. No Kidding…………

  105. I make my children tiny little sandwiches for their lunch and put them in these little bags.

    MY GOD CHICAGO, THINK OF THE CHILDREN!!!!!1!!

  106. I have a bag that’s about 2″ wide by 3.5″ tall that I got a long time ago at a career fair. It’s full of shredded up money from the Federal Reserve. It almost looks like you could smoke it… maybe you can. Perhaps fiat money is more valuable than we thought?

  107. “Solution to the weed problem is to legalize selling it in stores and tax the heck out of it so it will lower our taxes.”

    Wouldn’t “taxing the heck out of it” make taxes go up? Unless by “our taxes” you mean those who aren’t planning on buying weed. Why do people always add the “tax the heck out of it” to the pro-legalization argument. If you tax it too high there will still be a black market (see cigarette taxes in NY). Why not just tax it at a reasonable rate like most other items?

  108. Just the other week I had to bag up a bunch of resistor and capacitors for some electronics kits. I used the same size and type of plastic baggies because they are perfect for such things.

    Why are the people in charge so narrow minded and stupid?

  109. Yeah, that will stop them, cause like, the bags will be *illegal*

  110. The scariest thing is this guy is some sort of commanding officer of a a police unit……. How about an e-mail campaign to the CPD Narco and gang unit?

  111. I hates those who use the little baggins!! Yes, Yes……..precious will throttle them, we will…………

  112. Back 75 to 88 years ago, the USA proved that alcohol prohibition didn’t work. It just didn’t work. Whether using marijuana is moral or not, it just doesn’t mater, because USA tax payers are wasting too much money on the court system and prisons that could be used for more useful purposes. Whether you like it or not, billions of dollars are spent on marijuana every year, and not a dime of taxes are collected from the illegal sales.

    I propose the following to make it easier to get a law to pass:
    – Sell marijuana at liquor stores and cigarette shops in cigarette-form only by major cigarette manufacturers only, and add a “sin” tax for the local city or county to receive.
    – The legal age would NOT be lower than liquor (not beer). Why, in case they lower the beer drinking age.
    – You must ONLY smoke marijuana at home, otherwise illegal.
    – Marijuana would be included in the drinking-and-driving laws, thus no smoking-and-driving.
    – Must have a commercial license to grow marijuana, otherwise it is a felony. Why? To ensure the government collects taxes, which would be the #1 reason to promote the legalization.
    – Must have a manufacturer license to make marijuana cigarettes, otherwise it is a felony.
    – It would ONLY be legal for an individual to have marijuana in cigarette-form, otherwise the police wouldn’t be able to easily determine if it was purchased from a store or home grown to by-pass the taxes.
    – Allow hemp to be grown with another hemp commercial grower license to promote making ethanol for transportation use and other typical uses for low-THC hemp. Any hemp commercial grower that is caught growing HIGH-THC marijuana would be treated as a felony and lose their growers license, unless they also have a HIGH-THC marijuana growers license.

    I’m sure some of you will whine about what I propose and want to be able to grow it and smoke it anywhere. Well too bad, because it won’t happen. They need to make the taxes and strong rules otherwise congress would never pass the law. Its all about money (i.e. taxes) to make it pass!!!

    Do I smoke marijuana, no! Do I pay taxes, yes, and wish they were lower!

  113. Let’s assume that Chicago drug dealers do not get their supply of narcotics from inside the city, at least some of the time. If they can get drugs from outside the city, it would seem they would have no trouble getting Ziplocs too.

  114. Edward | March 5, 2008, 8:54pm | #
    Hey highnumber, here’s some precious, precious information for you: you’re a dickhead. But everyone is already aware of that.

    HAY. ADDIE, WHAT ABOUT THE REST OF US URKOBOLD FREAKS?

    /kicks pebble. blocks door to Stevo’s bunk.

    hrumph. ambles off to the meadow.

    (Ethan – they’ll start buying them in Palatine)

  115. Edward has just called someone a “dickhead.” What a vast deposit of irony… if we would just refine it into steely, we could supply the world!

  116. No one points out that the guy pushing this law came up with it after a mere walk in the park seeing a few bags on the ground.

    To bad he can’t walk around and see 15 each of all the real problems and do something about those.

    What delusion these people must have. First I thought it was a ban on grocery plastic bags. I figured that made sense since they wouldn’t be needed with the new sales tax driving away shoppers. At least the sales tax won’t affect drug sales in plastic baggies.

  117. “Solution to the weed problem is to legalize selling it in stores and tax the heck out of it so it will lower our taxes.”

    Please cite examples where increased revenue from a new tax resulted in other taxes being lowered, instead of increased government spending. Show your work.

    I propose the following to make it easier to get a law to pass:

    Your cure is as bad as the WoD. Note that most states don’t have dedicated liquor and cigarette stores. Here in Texas you can purchase both at convenience stores, grocery stores, discount stores, etc.

    They need to make the taxes and strong rules otherwise congress would never pass the law.

    I doubt your proposal will fly any higher in Congress than medical marijuana. 😉

    Violators would be punished by a $1,500 fine.

    For possession of a baggie. (expletinve deleted)

  118. Here they go attacking the symptoms again…
    I can just see their next move;

    “In light of all the pot, crank and crack smoking we are banning use of the index fingers and the thumbs within the City limits of Chicago. If caught utilizing said index fingers and/or thumbs for any reason, said offending thumb(s) and finger(s) will be amputated on the spot with poultry shears by an officer of the law.”

    Dumb $hits…

  119. P.S. The gov’t will not allow even pot to be legalized, they are sending in the feds to the pot clinics in California, so they are even fighting decriminalization.

    The reason? Everyone is making money in the “drug war.” Look at the huge cash and property confiscations the cops get when they make a big bust; they get a percentage of that, so why would they want it legalized? they also can keep their jobs and hire even MORE cops, to “fight drugs.”

    Here’s just one example of this;
    The DEA says it confiscates and burns 100,000 tons of pot a year in the U.S. but what they don’t tell you is that 90% of this total is ditchweed hemp that won’t get a fly high which is found growing all over the U.S. but especially in the midwest where it was grown commercially back in the 30’s and 40’s. They do this so they can say they are eradicating this huge amount and thereby KEEP THEIR FUNDING, and get to keep HIRING MORE COPS, to keep us all in our place, and not just for drug offenses.

    When asked about why they are going after ditchweed the DEA lamely replies that it is impossible to tell the ditchweed from the “good stuff” therefore it is “their duty” to BURN IT ALL.

    And we’re PAYING FOR THIS.

    Jeezus…

  120. How the hell am I supposed to make lunch for my pet Smurf?

  121. Drug Polymernailya in ChiTown “Crackdown”

    Another paint-by-the-numbers getting-tough episode, recalling the late-70s “Ex-Police” sketches on SNL; in this case a healthfood-store staffer spoons saffron threads into tiny baggies, crashing to the floor before an orange blaze to the final words he’ll ever hear: “Another drug-related death.”

  122. yeah, how did that work out for you?

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