Criminal Justice

Jimmy Justice

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A ballsy, foul-mouthed guy from New York has been videotaping traffic cops breaking the law. He confronts the offenders, mouths off to them, then posts the videos on YouTube. He's getting some national attention, including a write-up on MNSBC, and an appearance on the Today Show.

He'd be more effective if he were less of an asshole (language warning on the second video). Still, it's good fun to watch, particularly to hear the cops' reactions to being called out on their own law-breaking. For example, it's apparently okay for an NYPD officer to park in a no-parking zone to run personal errands if she's having her period. Also, it's now illegal (actually, it isn't) to videotape NYPD officers "because of the terrorism."

NEXT: More Good News for Richard Paey

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  1. Duh. Cops don’t follow traffic laws in NYC. Not only is this supremely obvious to anyone who lived there, it’s a given just knowing how cops feel they are better than “the civilians”.

    Also, remember that the Traffic plods didn’t used to be part of the NYPD. They were added under that umbrella after people started assaulting lots of the scumbags (have you ever had a traffic cop write you a ticket while you were in your car and ignore you as you said, “I’m moving–right now”). That way if you get pissed at one of these parasites and do something physical, you are now assaulting a police officer. I usually stuck to saying “doesn’t it suck to be universally hated?” to them.

  2. The more we watch the watchers the better for everyone.

    We need MORE taping of police on duty, as much as possible.

  3. aren’t police allowed to break traffic (and expecially parking) laws? I thought it was just one of those things – or are they only allowed to break those laws when their sirens are on?

  4. Id enjoy this if the guy were less of a jerk, but whatever. NY. I recently pretended to ‘film’ a cop sleeping in his roller with my Blackberry, and his partner threatened to arrest me for ‘interfering with police business’.

  5. “A government is a body of people usually notably ungoverned.”

    Shepherd Book

  6. When I was a teenager taking driver’s ed, this real ass hole of a cop came to talk to our class. He was all condecending and talking about safety and all that. Then when we left class, my mom and I were driving behind him and he ran right through a red light at the bottom of the hill (he was in his cruiser). And this was not the kind of running a red light where it just turned red, it had been red for a while.

  7. I’m amazed he wasn’t arrested. Here in the boonies, they haul you off to jail if you videotape police. (Just because the police are violating somebodies civil rights doesn’t give you the right to violate a policeman’s privacy.)

  8. What privacy? They’re public employees acting in official capacity on public streets.

  9. I’d expect nothing less from New York’s finest. After all, I read both Target Blue and Serpico.

  10. I’m appalled by the many commenters on the MSNBC story who basically take the attitude “let the cops do as they please since the poor dears work so hard to keep us safe.”

  11. When I was a kid this jerk cop rear ends an old man at the red light. Cop knows he’s in trouble because he’s had lots of similar problems. Solution: Write the old man a traffic ticket for backing up at a red light.

    In the end, it didn’t work out and the cop was allowed to quietly resign so he could go work for another department.

  12. I was hoping to enjoy this a lot more. You know how everyone every busted for some trivial infraction such as jaywalking whines, “Don’t the cops have anything better to do? How about investigating some real crimes?”

    That’s kind of how I felt about this.

  13. Just another example of the government (legally or not) doing someone ordinary citizens may not.

  14. goddamn. how many govt employees does it take to buy a tampon?

  15. He’d be more effective if he were less of an asshole

    True that. Cops should be videoed at all times when their on duty. Has anyone ever had a positive experience dealing with the police? The cops are the country’s number one organized crime problem. Not that you’d know that from what you see here.

  16. I’ll go out on a limb and state the obvious, but just for some balance: We all want a cop there if you’re a victim of a crime, especially a violent crime (and preferably not one committed *by* a cop).

    But yeah, from my experience, most cops are power-drunk assholes. The question is, are they previously decent people who become corrupted by the job, or is this the type that police work attracts?

    As was the motto of the supermarket I worked at as a lad: “We don’t train people to be friendly. We hire friendly people.”

  17. My guess is that a citizenry antagonizing their police force is probably not going to lead to any sort of improvement in policing.

  18. But yeah, from my experience, most cops are power-drunk assholes. The question is, are they previously decent people who become corrupted by the job, or is this the type that police work attracts?

    My experience is that if you’re just a run-of-the-mill schmuck who doesn’t think too much about things, the job will turn you bad. If you think about it, you MIGHT stay good, but more likely you’ll just quit. Also many complete dicks seek the job because they want to bust scumbags as a kind of surrogate for some form of self-worth.

  19. A citizen concerned about unlawful activities of law enforcement is antagonizing? Maybe this guy, but in general, I don’t think so.

    If the cops don’t like it, they should obey the laws.

    I’m not sure how a public servant do their public job on public streets have anymore right to privacy than the rest of us. Also, the plain view doctrine should not be a one way street.

  20. In the first video, the cop said something about the illegality of JJ videoing her without her permission. Anyone know what the laws are on this? Is it actually illegal to record and use someone’s image without their consent? Regardless, as a discussion topic for H&R readers, should it be a law (not just for cops, but for all private citizens)?

    I can see both sides of the argument here. I’d like to hear what people around these parts have to say.

  21. My guess is that a citizenry rolling over for illegal behavior by their police force is probably not going to lead to any sort of improvement in policing.

  22. Cops shouldn’t break the law. And they certainly are no better than the average citizen – probably not as good since they are all power-hungry neanderthals. Except I guess when they run towards danger while everyone else is running from it.

    But, hey, they’re assholes cause they give out tickets, right? Damn their hides.

  23. “The question is, are they previously decent people who become corrupted by the job, or is this the type that police work attracts?”

    More importantly, do cops grow mustaches as part of their job, or does police work simply attract guys with mustaches?

  24. “Has anyone ever had a positive experience dealing with the police? ”

    I’ve had a couple.

    Got pulled over in the middle of a *well lit* suburban area by a cop for driving w/out my lights on–I’d just pulled out of a fast food joint and hadn’t noticed. He let me drive off.

    Had a cop pull me for driving with an expired tag. Didn’t have my insurance *or* registration on me. Got another verbal warning.

    In *both* cases I pulled over immediately (in the case of the motorcycle event I started for the shoulder before he tripped his lights), and was polite and answered all the cops questions w/out argument. I admitted that I was in the wrong etc.

    Wouldn’t have helped if the cops were a-holes, but it doesn’t do anyone any good to *start* shit.

  25. Except I guess when they run towards danger while everyone else is running from it.

    Yes, these heroic cops who won’t serve a warrant on a non-violent drug offender without submachine guns, body armor, flash-bang grenades, and some gratuitous pet-killing.

  26. We need a whole lot more of this. I agree with another commenter, the “plain sight” clause works in two directions. Especially true in a society like ours, established to be a country of “rule by law”, rather than “rule by men.”

  27. What privacy? They’re public employees acting in official capacity on public streets.

    You’d think the police would be OK with being filmed since there are so many surveillance cameras in use already.

    Or are the police like ghosts and don’t actually show up on government cameras?

  28. I’ve had surprisingly good experiences with cops, but that’s probably because I revert into the “yes, sir”, “no, sir”, “thank you, officer” kowtowing that let’s them know that I’m not going to be a problem. I’m not proud of that, but it’s the truth.

  29. Interesting, but parking violations are chump change, and could lead to a “cry wolf” response to more serious violations like beatings, arrests for non-crimes (like videotaping police), and forced entry and shootings under trumped up warrants such as Balko has frequently reported here.

    The upside would be that police forces nationwide come to realize that they are subject to video recording at any time during the performance of their official duties. Nobody will get too upset if they thump on someone resisting a legitimate arrest. However they’d better be sure that they’re acting in accordance with law and procedure if they need to thump or shoot.

  30. Warren

    I did once. I ran out of gas on my motorcycle (yeah I’m an idiot) in the middle of a bridge (the 520 bridge for all you Seattle folk). Fortunately, the bike was light enough for me to push it along the side of the road. A state cop pulled up behind me, I told him my story. Cop could have written me a big ticket, but didn’t. He also gave me a ride to the gas station and back to the bike after I had pushed the bike to the other side. He didn’t have to do that either.

  31. Almost all of my experiences with police officers have been positive. If you are polite and cooperative, most of them are reasonable and can even be quite helpful. Cops are usually – not always, but usually – pretty good guys. It’s probably okay to give them the benefit of a doubt.

    Almost all of my experiences with parking enforcers, however, have been negative. And parking enforcers ARE NOT cops, I don’t care how many costumes they wear or how many badges you slap on them. There will never be a parking enforcement emergency. You will never see a parking enforcer busting gangbangers and coke-heads. So there is no need to ever give them the benefit of the doubt.

    We have a comfortable arrangement, though – they pretend to be police officers and I pretend to respect them.

  32. Except I guess when they run towards danger while everyone else is running from it.

    Like at Virginia Tech?
    That was real successful.
    The cops were cowering like a bunch of women.

  33. Matthew just reminded me of a time…

    My POS VW Beetle’s windshield wipers once quit in the rain, on a Pa highway the day after Thanksgiving. He not only helped me push it to a safe location, he also drove me most of the way back to my relative’s house that I came from. Not a short drive.

  34. I’ve had surprisingly good experiences with cops, but that’s probably because I revert into the “yes, sir”, “no, sir”, “thank you, officer” kowtowing that let’s them know that I’m not going to be a problem. I’m not proud of that, but it’s the truth.

    My experiences with cops have been good for the same reason. But I don’t consider it “kowtowing”, just politeness.

  35. I had a Virginia state trooper give me a ride when I was hitchhiking back in the 70s. (Upon questioning, he pointed out that I was actually breaking the law by hitching on the ramp between two interstate highways, so I guess he was doing me a second favor by not ticketing me.)

    I agree with the attitude that it’s best to start out giving cops the benefit of the doubt and assume they’re decent people. But by the same token, I’m just not going to be too surprised when some of them turn out to be power-mad assholes.

  36. Is it just me or did anyone else notice that the filmer’s big problem doesn’t seem to be cops, but black female cops?

    Heh.

  37. Almost all of my experiences with police officers have been positive. If you are polite and cooperative, most of them are reasonable and can even be quite helpful

    Almost all of my experience with police officers if I was alone or only with other white people have been positive. But if you have someone with dark skin with you, god help you.

  38. The cops were cowering like a bunch of women.

    No, they were cowering like a bunch of spineless chickenshits. Chickenshittery knows no gender.

  39. Being polite to the cops is just being smart, but this is because they have too much power. Most cops will generally be pretty cool to you if you are nice to them, but wait until you encounter one in a bad mood or with an axe to grind. That’s when you realize that this fucker could make your life a living hell if they wanted, and how difficult it would be to deal with the situation.

  40. I’ve not had terrible experiences with cops. Some have even been good.

    I had a cop pull me over once when I was unwinding on my birthday. I don’t drink, but I’m sure I was speeding and not paying terribly close attention to the road. After he looked over my license, he chose to cite me for a badly cracked windshield. It was. Nominal $1 fine once I had proof that I had fixed it. (Of course, fixing it cost $200, so in a sense it was a sizeable fine.)

    Had another pull me over when I had just dropped my kid off at school and was a little hasty getting out of the school zone. Gave me a warning (could have been a $200 fine.)

    Had yet another cite me for having a headlight out. Yeah, it was out. $60 fine. This one did irritate me.

    Last winter, I lost traction on a snowpacked, slick-as-a-gross-metaphor road, and watched helplessly as I slid into the back of a brand-new SUV. $8000 damage between the two cars. The cop helped me get a tow, drove me and the kids home, and had the court dismiss the citation. (I still wonder why she felt she had to give it in the first place.)

    I had a friend a few years back that was a cop. Prior to being a cop, he had been a Marine sergeant. He barely made it through police academy, seeing as how he had had a good chunk of his lower left leg shot off in Vietnam. He didn’t admire *all* his fellow officers, but he also understood that you never knew when someone might abruptly pull a gun on you, and some cops overreacted. I can understand why a cop might be a bit abrupt with someone with a bad attitude, since somewhere in the back of his mind is the question of whether this is going to be the traffic stop he doesn’t go home from.

  41. In any encounter with police, the rule of thumb is to lie to them with utmost kindness and respect.

  42. Hey, the guy’s not being racist…the bulk…and I mean the VAST majority…of the traffic enforcement officers here in NYC are black…at least, I don’t remember ever seeing a white/asian/latino one, but now I’ll look.
    and BTW, do you all realize that NYC cops get FREE PARKING as part of the union contract? either a garage by the station house, or they simply toss a placard on the dash and leave their personal cars in whatever hydrant/bus stop/ no parking zone they can find.

  43. We all want a cop there if you’re a victim of a crime,

    Speak for yourself, whitey. There is no circumstance in which I would even consider any voluntary interaction with any member of any law enforcement agency, ever. That’s like pulling the pin on a grenade and holding it because, hey, one in a million is a dud. There is no situation their presence can improve. At best, you survive, terrorized.

    You can’t even call an amblulance here anymore without a pair of them showing up first and breaking an epileptic’s jaw for “resisting,” then throwing down and knee-pinning his wife to the ground by her neck when she objects. (One personal anecdote out of many.)

    especially a violent crime (and preferably not one committed *by* a cop).

    I have never once in my life been the victim of or even so much as witnessed any other kind, and I’m from the “hood.” Because I’m from there, actually.

    Evidently, none of you is. If the cops think you can’t afford a lawyer, everything is different. Your “positive” stories sound like manic delusional rants from over here.

  44. In any encounter with police, the rule of thumb is to lie to them with utmost kindness and respect.

    Beautifully stated, Russ.

    There is no circumstance in which I would even consider any voluntary interaction with any member of any law enforcement agency, ever.

    Agreed, for the most part. The only reason I can see for calling the cops is if you know that by not calling them you will probably get yourself into a worse situtation than calling them could create.

    Your “positive” stories sound like manic delusional rants from over here.

    I’ve never had any interaction with cops that I would call “positive”. I have had a number where, by being polite, it was “not negative”. I have also had negative interactions, but it wasn’t too bad because I am white, have money, lived in the right places, and knew the right people. I am fully aware that if this were not the case, it could have been far worse.

  45. I’ve had a couple positives. Lot’s of negatives too, but then I never pay my traffic tickets until they take me to jail.

    Had a cop pull me over for a cracked windsheild, walked up and said, “Hey, you should get that fixed (pointing at windsheild). Most of the cops in this city (his), will pull you over for something stupid like that and ticket you”. I said thanks, he said no problem. (Glendale PD, CA)

    Also had a van full of servers, got pulled over for a headlight around the corner from the office I was delivering to at 3am. Had warrants, driving on suspended, was going to jail, and car was being impounded. Asked the cop if there was any way I could unload the equipment before they towed.

    1st cop drove my van around corner to office, and both cops HELPED me unload all the equipment before they let the tow truck hook up and cuffed me. 3 hours later they released me, (city the warrants were from didn’t want to come get me), and the cop who originally arrested me gave me a ride back to my office.
    (San Diego PD, CA)

    Everytime I’ve dealt with the CHP, they’ve been completely professional, no bs, you did this, write ticket, be careful getting back on , and goodbye.

    In my experience with cops, and because I refuse to deal with tickets until I’m forced to, it’s a LOT of experience; Most cops are jerks, and enjoy being jerks. A few are just good guys, trying to do a righteous job.

    So these days I wait until the cop acts like a jerk, before I treat him like one.

  46. “Yes, these heroic cops who won’t serve a warrant on a non-violent drug offender without submachine guns, body armor, flash-bang grenades, and some gratuitous pet-killing.”

    Love the strawman dodge.

    If they would just let you smoke your weed, I am sure you would love them – lol

  47. I never pay my traffic tickets until they take me to jail.

    Had warrants, driving on suspended, was going to jail, and car was being impounded.

    That’s an exciting lifestyle, dadeth, to say the least. May I ask, out of genuine curiosity and nothing else, why that’s your policy? I paid my car fees late this year, for example, so I know from dilatory, but that just seems like a lot more work for yourself in the end.

  48. The real shame is I can see this type of thing (the video taping) increasing enough to piss the right people off.

    “The right people” being the stewards of liberty making it illegal to tape a cop doing his job because [insert reason here].

    Remember, the cops can do no wrong, and having a bunch of people around and taping any cop activity may pose a hazard to public safety.

  49. If they would just let you smoke your weed, I am sure you would love them

    Love the strawman after accusing me of a strawman. Way to be intellectually incoherent in two sentences.

    You go suck up to the cops. Then one day you’re going to be in the wrong place at the wrong time with the wrong cop in the wrong mood and your love of the fuzz will change dramatically.

  50. Well, I’ve had more than the average number of police contacts, even before I became a district attorney, and with me, their treatment of me was a reflection of how I treated them. Of course, I am and always have been the kind that’s overly polite to authority figures (FTR, I have received exactly ONE warning in my 26 years of driving, and I paid for that one with a thirty minute lecture).

    Coming from this side of the courtroom, I will say that many police come with more attitude than the average citizen. Of course, how much of that is the fact that most of their job is dealing with the worse parts of our society (no, even for CHP officers, I’d guesstimate that at least half of their workday is taken up by people who have more going on than a simple 76-in-a-65-zone), and the fact that the public perception has changed over the last forty years from the police being an overly glamorized profession, to (IMO) an overly demonized one, both of which lead to a seige mentality, and rather short fuses.

    Let’s put it this way – how would you approach your job if about half of your “customers” represented a real risk to your health, much less were actively working to keep you from doing your job, and the other half at best resented you doing your job, at worst were rooting for the other half of your “customers?”

  51. You’d think the police would be OK with being filmed since there are so many surveillance cameras in use already.

    Or are the police like ghosts and don’t actually show up on government cameras?

    Police have control of the CCTV feeds. With your camera, they can’t control what actually gets viewed by the public, or the defense.

    A case in point.

    Sergeant Karsnia had by now reviewed the CCTV video evidence and made a margin note ordering the video evidence from 5 cameras burned to disc. My personal request for video evidence was never answered by Airport Police. There are over 800 CCTV cameras at MSP Airport. The system was substantially upgraded after 9-11. Police are now claiming through the prosecution that I didn’t show up on any camera.

  52. You know, all these municipalities with revenue problems have parking laws to not only keep the streets in stable condition but also to inevitably create revenue.

    I have a simple plan that will both stop these criminal power tripping officers and help cities acquire more revenue. Simply create a small office that randomly audits the force and also accepts legally submissible evidence of wrongdoing. Instead of simply firing the officer, as another jobless person would not solve anything, fine them a certain amount to be directly drawn out of their city paycheck. I’m sure something like that would quickly clean things up.

  53. making it illegal to tape a cop doing his job because [insert reason here].

    This is where the use of hidden cameras comes in. I bet there are a few available on the web, or in spy shops.

  54. JW (It was just for balance but what the heck)
    “I’ll go out on a limb and state the obvious, but just for some balance: We all want a cop there if you’re a victim of a crime, especially a violent crime (and preferably not one committed *by* a cop).”

    So if I was drowning and a Nazi through me a life preserver would I have to be thankful for Nazi’s? (Drink)
    I would prefer to have my own life preserver and not need the Nazi.

    My reading of the above posts about “good encounters” with cops basically say, “He could have screwed me but didn’t.” I guess that counts as a good encounter.

  55. Marcvs | August 20, 2007, 2:11pm,

    It is called Social Engineering.

    Perfectly acceptable.

    In such situations it is wise to always be sincere, whether you mean it or not.

  56. Tully | August 20, 2007, 2:44pm | #

    Is it just me or did anyone else notice that the filmer’s big problem doesn’t seem to be cops, but black female cops?

    Heh.

    No, most traffic cops (who, to be fair, arent really real cops at all) are black women in NYC. They dont tend to be beat cops.

    Real rollers are in the white cars with blue trim. Those blue cars are ticket ladies basically. and if this dude tried this shit with real beat cops… eventually he’d get a REAL popular youtube clip of himself getting punked.

  57. While I respect the hard job the police have dealing with the public, the not so gentlemanly gentleman is doing something similar to what I have just dreamed about. I watch police speeding (no lights or siren), changing lanes with no turn signals and other violations and would so like to get the car number/license number and turn them in. But everyone believes they know what would happen if you did. Just as the owner of the bar in New England would not let the undercover policeman in to check for under age drinkers because he didn’t have ID was charged with obstructing the police. But if he had let the police officer in he would have violated the “check the ID” requirement. As with most who are granted power over others, the police officers forget that they have no more everyday privileges than mere citizens.

  58. Now THAT would be worth seeing…some out-of-control powerfreak losing it for being caught fucking up. It wouldn’t surprise me in the least…sadly.

  59. I work in policing in Australia. I can’t really comment on U.S. experiences without having been there. However, over here we often refer to traffic police as ‘jury killers’ for their inevitable upsetting of everyday people.

    There’s nothing wrong with making your police more accountable. Be careful watch you wish for, though. I work with a number of ex-english cops. The anecdotal evidence from them is that the British modern day obsession with police accountabilty has lead to a desk-bound service that no longer gets out of the station to look for any criminals. Violent crime rates in Britain have soared and everyday people are more vulnerable than ever.

    And don’t forget how dangerous the job can be. Casualties in the U.S. are now higher than ever;
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070816/ap_on_re_us/deputy_shot

    ‘More U.S. police officers were killed while on duty in the first six months of 2007 – 101 – than during any such period since 1978, according to the National Law Enforcement Memorial Fund, which tracks the numbers. That included 39 who were fatally shot – up from 27 during the same period last year – and 45 who died in traffic accidents.

    “It’s the most dangerous profession in America,” said Craig W. Floyd, chairman of the Washington-based group. “You never know when the odds are going catch up with you.”‘

  60. “It’s the most dangerous profession in America,” said Craig W. Floyd…

    Bullshit, Mr. Floyd. Cop doesn’t even make the top ten list of most dangerous jobs, when ranked by fatality rate (deaths per 100,000 employees). It isn’t even the most dangerous municipal job (that honor goes to refuse & recylable material collectors). If you’re going to lie, it might be best to not lie about something that is verifiably false.

    http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfnr0012.pdf

  61. This guy is an idiot. These enforcement officers have to deal with jerk offs like this everyday. They should be able to park wherever they want. God forbid you need these people to help you in a time of crisis. How come no common sense bystander hasn’t beat the crap out of this moron. Are New Yorkers turning into a bunch of pansies?

  62. Scooby- that document at http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfnr0012.pdf must be read carefully. Police are lumped (presumably) in the category of ‘justice, public order and safety activities’ under Local Government and public administration. There seems to be no listing or examination of police only. That means that the fatality rate per 100,000 people is dragged down by a lot of other public sector employees being counted in the statistical mix.

    Thus police don’t seem to even rate a mention in the chart on ‘Selected Occupations with high fatality rates’. The selection process has excluded them altogether by lumping them with other government employees.

    This doesn’t prove Floyd right, but it doesn’t prove him wrong, either.

    Now, there are 663,535 police officers in the United States (see http://www.theiacp.org/faq.htm ). And 101 have died in the first six months of this year. Take away non-operational police- admin, training, prosecuting, stores- and the casualty rate per 100,000 police who are actually operational would be reasonably high (i’m not sure it is the very highest, but it ain’t low either).

    The ‘Selected occupations with high fatality rates’ graph describes professional drivers (transport etc) as the one occupation with the worst fatality rate. Operational police spend a lot of time driving everyday, some of it under high risk conditions (chases, priority attendance etc). Nearly half of this years police fatalities were traffic related.

    I can’t help wondering if some of the police driving fatalities are even included in the ‘driver/sales workers and truck drivers’ fatality rate per 100,000, unfortunately the details are not broken down enough in the graph.

  63. These enforcement officers have to deal with jerk offs like this everyday. They should be able to park wherever they want. God forbid you need these people to help you in a time of crisis.

    What possible crisis might I face that could only be solved by traffic-ticket writers? “Help! Help! I’m being attacked by a would-be rapist! If you give me your ticket-book, maybe I can ward him off with a really nasty paper cut.”

  64. Some more thoughts on the figures provided by Scooby that I wrote on a few posts up.

    Page three of the workplace fatality figures at http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfnr0012.pdf shows that in 2005, the most dangerous workplace was ‘agriculture, forestry, fishing & hunting’ at 32.5 deaths per 100,000 employees.

    Total Police fatalities were 145 in 2006, and are 101 for the first half of 2007. If we thus assume a death rate of 202 for the year, and that there are 663,535 police, then the fatalities could be 30.44 /100,000 for this year, and were 21.85/100,000 last year.

    It will only take a very slight drop in this years ‘agriculture, forestry, fishing & hunting’ category, or a slight further increase in police fatalities, and policing will indeed be the most dangerous profession in the U.S.

  65. Years ago I interned at the NYC DOT and part of my internship involved driving around in city-owned cars. We were told we could park anywhere except “No Parking Anytime” zones. (And we didn’t have to feed the meters.) We were also told to use common sense and not park anywhere we’d be obstructing traffic, garages, and so on. While I certainly think cops should, as a rule, follow basic traffic laws that pertain to road safety, I have no problem with a cop parking in a no parking spot that isn’t as bus stop, isn’t blocking anybody, and isn’t dangerous, even if it’s just to run a quick personal errand in a Rite Aid. This guy is a class-A #1 jerk-off; the cops should’a just laughed at him and ignored him. What kind of society are we living in when it’s noteworthy that some idiot with nothing better to do gets his jollies harassing people just trying to do their jobs?

  66. Some police (I have no idea if the ones in the video are in this category) are actually ordered to park their vehicle close to where they are, by the way, no matter what they are doing, so that they can respond to call outs quicker. In some aussie jurisdictions (including mine) police, ambulance & fire service vehicles are exempted from the parking by-laws as a result.

    Whoops- a quick correction by yours truly re. my earlier post….

    We should also look at the graph on page 4, which breaks the figures down into more specific job descriptions. That puts fishermen at the top of the list with a whopping 118.4/100,000, and would probably put police somewhere lower in the top ten if we assume 30.44/100,000.

    Of course, if we were able to break the police figures down further, there’s no telling what we would get- except that it would be higher. Out of the 663,535 police, an unknown number aren’t operational, so we would be hard pressed to compare it with (say) ‘drivers’ or ‘logging workers’ who presumably all are (if they weren’t, they would be in the office worker figures). If we could lump non-operational police in an office/admin worker category we would see a more accurate picture of their casualties at the operational end.

  67. I’m from the UK where generally cops drive absolutely by the book in order to set an example. Since moving to the US I’ve been appalled by how badly cops drive here. They’ll change lanes without signaling, cross in and out of the carpool lane illegally, the list goes on.

    This sets a really bad example and suggests that laws are malleable. Of course cops have to bypass laws when rushing to an emergency or pursuing criminals, but not when heading to a donut break!

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