Drug Policy

LEAP Blogs

|

The good people at Law Enforcement Against Prohibition now have a blog.

Worth bookmarking, and passing the word.

NEXT: But, But, But....Clinton!

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Several of those posts are quite good. I especially like the one discussing the difference between the ‘legalization/ending prohibition’ rhetoric vs the medical marijuana rhetoric as a means of effectively swaying opinion.

    I also like the description of the traffic stop in Kalamazoo, MI, where police are basically caught on tape conspiring to violate the rights of a black teenager during a traffic stop.

    The post about the cost of prosecuting the 4 Mexican drug suspects recently extradited to the US breaks the rule of shouting though. About halfway through it I was tired of reading the ALL CAPS POINTS that he was using to EMPHASIZE his opinion.

    But overall, yet another good resource.

  2. Looks pretty good. I note a lack of comments though. I hope they are ready for the inevitable cyber attacks. And I especially hope they don’t resort to deleting comments they don’t like.

  3. I think it was smart (and ballsy) to put their pictures in there. Gives them a more legitimate feel.

  4. Q: What if all police were like this?

    A: The world would be a far, far better place.

  5. I wonder how hard it is to be a libertarian cop?
    Can you refuse to make drug busts?

  6. Can you refuse to make drug busts?

    No. A police officer cannot simply turn a blind eye to a violation of the law. He can however decide how hard he wants to look for violations of certain laws.

    There is a lot of leeway about how you prioritize your enforcement efforts.

  7. “I also like the description of the traffic stop in Kalamazoo, MI, where police are basically caught on tape conspiring to violate the rights of a black teenager during a traffic stop.”

    I would like to point out that you (the reader) must deduce that the teenager is black from material not in the story.

  8. Wayne – You’re right. It doesn’t specifically say that Moore was black. Although it is implied by this passage.

    Refusing to voluntarily consent to a search is probable cause for a search. Politely reminding police officers that they are exceeding the bounds of their lawful authority? Probable cause for a search. Being young, male and black, that’s probable cause, too.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.