Economics

School House Rock! Tyrannosaurus Debt

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To Americans who grew up in the 70s, "School House Rock!" is as familiar as "Sponge Bob Square Pants" is to children today. And now that the series is available on DVD as well as YouTube, a new generation can sing along to "Lolly Lolly Lolly, Get Your Adverbs Here," "Three Is a Magic Number" and, of course, "Conjunction Junction."

But even Generation Xers who were steeped in School House Rock! every Saturday morning may not be familiar with "Money Rock," a series created in the 90s when the "School House Rock!" band got back together for a revival tour.

As was evident in the "America Rock" series (see, for example, "No More Kings" and "Sufferin' Till Suffrage"), "Money Rock" emphasizes themes that libertarian-leaning folks everywhere can appreciate.

"Tyrannosourus Debt" is the hands down favorite in my house. Watch the ending closely and you'll see a cameo by "Bill."

(As of March 2008, the US national debt is $9.4 trillion–approximately $31,000 per US citizen. The debt is growing at a rate of $1.65 billion/day.)